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Woodmere Art Museum

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NEWS
May 9, 1993 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Pennsylvania impressionism is better known in our metropolitan area than the actual paintings these early 20th-century artists produced, an oversight that Woodmere Art Museum is trying to correct in its current exhibit, "Pennsylvania Impressionism. " Of course, impressionism was a school of painting, really a revolution in painting, that started in France and spread to other lands in the late 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century. Artists of this persuasion aimed to represent things on canvas according to their own personal impressions, without regard to generally recognized rules, and while painting outdoors in an effort to render changing effects of light and reflection with striking immediacy.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The human figure has always fascinated oil painter Mark Reitz, but not in the classical sense. Rather, he stretches the boundaries of representational art, making bodies a blur in his dreamy, illusive abstractions. That is apparent in pieces such as Group Study, an oil-on-paper work that recently won the Violet Oakley Prize in the Woodmere Art Museum's 54th annual Members' Exhibition, on view at the Chestnut Hill museum through Aug. 28. Reitz's painting is among the work of more than 300 museum members exhibiting in the non-juried, multimedia show, which includes paintings, drawings, sculptures and prints.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Georgia S. McWhinney, 85, of Wyncote, an associate professor in the field of literacy, died Wednesday, May 20, of cancer at her home. Dr. McWhinney devoted her energies to her family and the study and teaching of emergent literacy in both children and adults. Emergent literacy , a term coined by researcher Marie Clay, refers to the gradual process by which children and adults interact with language, books, and those around them on the road to literacy. A part of the process is speaking, listening, writing, and viewing words and pictures.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Frances Galante's home, a portrait she painted of the Maine countryside hangs prominently. It's the kind of work that would stop visiting friends. Some would ask questions; most would admire. Ms. Galante always would be humble. "She would say, 'My paintings aren't that great,' or, 'This still needs work,' " said Linda Galante, her sister. "But I know so many people who would look at her art and start crying because it was so moving. " Ms. Galante, 57, a prominent painter in the region, died Tuesday, March 10, in her Philadelphia home after a long battle with ovarian cancer.
NEWS
September 1, 2013 | By Megan Lydon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia native Patricia Leslie Noonan, 66, who spent years as a volunteer at the Woodmere Art Museum, died Aug. 19 after a fall in her home in Amelia Island, Fla., her family said. A tireless volunteer, Mrs. Noonan also worked for Springside Chestnut Hill Academy and William Penn Charter School, and the Chestnut Hill Musical Cocktails, one of the Philadelphia Orchestra's fund-raising committees. After graduating from Harriton High School, she went to Washington College and afterward earned her master's in education at Tufts University.
NEWS
September 23, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Lear's art might have saved him from harm's way during World War II. A niece, Susan MacBride, recalled yesterday that when he was assigned to Fort Riley, Kan., "the generals and the officers found out he was an artist [and] diverted his talents to doing portraits of the officers and their families. " Later, she said, he was assigned to illustrate military manuals, booklets and charts for service-wide distribution. On Wednesday, John Brock Lear Jr., 98, artist and teacher, died of pneumonia at Chestnut Hill Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Although he's a relatively obscure figure in standard histories of American art, James D. Smillie (1833-1909) was a superb reproductive engraver and etcher. Abundant evidence of his skill emerges in a retrospective of his graphic work at the Woodmere Art Museum, organized by director Michael W. Schantz. As Schantz points out in a catalogue essay, Smillie's career paralleled the development of printmaking in the 19th century. He began as a line engraver and at the turn of the century became a leading figure in the etching revival.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The recent traveling exhibition of baseball images called "Diamonds Are Forever" demonstrated that while sports and recreation have long been popular subjects for American artists, they have produced relatively little memorable art. "Sport in Art" at the Woodmere Art Museum in Chestnut Hill reaches a similar conclusion. Its scope - from baseball and football to rowing, tennis and auto racing - is much broader, but it, too, leads a viewer to conclude that sports do not translate readily into high art. Television and the other mass media have made even the most obscure sports commonplace, and they document them in such detail that there isn't much left for art to chew on. But it's also likely that few artists have been able to dig below the surface of these mass entertainments, which is why most sporting art seems cliched.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1991 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
My choices for the weekend include a concert by the Leontovych String Quartet, an ensemble that had a distinguished reputation in its homeland, the Ukraine. The quartet has been living in the Philadelphia area for about a year now, attempting to rebuild and begin anew in the States. Its well-balanced program tomorrow promises some scintillation: the Mozart Quartet in B flat, Valentin Silverstrov's Quartet No. 1, (composed in 1964), the Schubert Quartetsatz and Philadelphia composer Maurice Wright's Quartet (1983)
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
German-Americans, says H. Richard Dietrich Jr., hold "a belief in sharing. " It's a trait reflected in his family's generous offerings of Early American painting and furniture to museums and galleries around the country. Part of the family's large collection is on display this month at the Woodmere Art Museum in Chestnut Hill. The offerings from the Chester Springs- based Dietrich American Foundation include 19th-century painting, drawings and hand-colored lithographs from the American West as well as fraktur from Eastern Pennsylvania.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Georgia S. McWhinney, 85, of Wyncote, an associate professor in the field of literacy, died Wednesday, May 20, of cancer at her home. Dr. McWhinney devoted her energies to her family and the study and teaching of emergent literacy in both children and adults. Emergent literacy , a term coined by researcher Marie Clay, refers to the gradual process by which children and adults interact with language, books, and those around them on the road to literacy. A part of the process is speaking, listening, writing, and viewing words and pictures.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
On Friday, in front of the Delaware County Courthouse on Front Street, the Borough of Media will hold a small ceremony celebrating the hanging of Thomas Moran's monumental 1892 painting, Grand Canyon of the Colorado River . Well, not the real McCoy (or Moran), one of the masterpieces of the Philadelphia Museum of Art's collection. Media's Moran will be a very high-quality reproduction in an elaborate frame, all coated with an anti-graffiti resin. Pop-up outdoor art installations are coming to town.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Retrospectives generally reveal the trajectory of an artist's career as a horizontal path with a few zigs and zags here and there and a recognizable "signature" style settling in at some point, usually when the artist is in his or her 30s, occasionally much earlier or later. The career of Frank Bramblett, on the other hand, whose retrospective at the Woodmere Art Museum, "Frank Bramblett: No Intention," offers four decades of his art, follows no such pattern. Looking at the stylistic shifts in his work from 1968 to the present, it's obvious that his painting has developed largely through curiosity rather than any set agendas.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Bitting met Ellen Marsden Smedley in the 1970s, when both were teaching at the Sheppard School in Lower Kensington. "She ran an unbelievable art program" for children from kindergarten through fourth grade, Bitting said, and did it without a classroom dedicated to art. She had a cart filled with supplies on each of the three floors of Sheppard, Bitting said. "Sometimes, after a class on the third floor," she said, "she would have to tear down to the first floor for her next class.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Frances Galante's home, a portrait she painted of the Maine countryside hangs prominently. It's the kind of work that would stop visiting friends. Some would ask questions; most would admire. Ms. Galante always would be humble. "She would say, 'My paintings aren't that great,' or, 'This still needs work,' " said Linda Galante, her sister. "But I know so many people who would look at her art and start crying because it was so moving. " Ms. Galante, 57, a prominent painter in the region, died Tuesday, March 10, in her Philadelphia home after a long battle with ovarian cancer.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - Some artists are influenced by Pop Art. Others, such as sculptor Maddelinde Wiker, 20, are influenced by Pop Pop's art. In this case, Pop Pop is Lance Balderson, 73, a well-regarded abstract painter whose work hangs in the Woodmere Art Museum, Columbia University School of Law, and the Curtis Institute of Music. One painting, Tryst , has been displayed at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. But beginning this week, the art of Balderson and his granddaughter bookend a distinctive exhibit at the Ocean City Arts Center.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
But for the efforts of several art historians who sought her out in the last decades of her life, Theresa Bernstein would have been just another forgotten female artist. Fortunately, one of those historians was Gail Levin. She is distinguished professor of art history, American studies, and women's studies at Baruch College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, as well as author of books on Lee Krasner and Edward Hopper, and a former Whitney Museum curator. In addition, Levin is the editor of a book on Bernstein and the curator of the artist's first retrospective, "Theresa Bernstein: A Century in Art," a traveling show that recently arrived at the Woodmere Art Museum.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through a work of art, the two women were hoping to save a connection that is slipping away. Their husbands, who have Alzheimer's disease, are becoming more distant, their marriages more solitary and fraught with worry. But in a discussion of a painting called The Immigrants , those husbands - Jack Williams and Dick Force - virtually carried the conversation at the Woodmere Art Museum, in Chestnut Hill. The two men, whose wives had met through their mutual experience as caregivers, found the story in the brushstrokes and shared their thoughts about the discovery.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Sozanski, 77, art critic for The Inquirer, who over three decades became a major figure in describing and documenting the city's cultural transformation from regional byway to the national main stage, died suddenly Monday, April 14, in Gladwyne. The cause of death has not been determined. Whether writing about America's first sculptor, William Rush, or art from Korea's Joseon dynasty, or the way John Cage's musical "scores" looked on the page, Mr. Sozanski always sought to directly engage the art and provide his readers with an utterly independent critical judgment.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Megan Lydon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doris Staffel Malarkey, a highly praised artist and teacher and a devoted Buddhist and mother, will have her life celebrated at the Arch Street Meeting House on Friday, Nov. 1. Known professionally as Doris Staffel, she died of coronary artery disease Sept. 13 at her Society Hill home at age 91. Born Doris Blitman in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mrs. Staffel started drawing at age 3, and painted up to three weeks before she died, said daughter Megan Staffel. "As long as she could paint, she felt energized and excited about life," Staffel said.
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