CollectionsWoodmere Art Museum
IN THE NEWS

Woodmere Art Museum

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 9, 1993 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Pennsylvania impressionism is better known in our metropolitan area than the actual paintings these early 20th-century artists produced, an oversight that Woodmere Art Museum is trying to correct in its current exhibit, "Pennsylvania Impressionism. " Of course, impressionism was a school of painting, really a revolution in painting, that started in France and spread to other lands in the late 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century. Artists of this persuasion aimed to represent things on canvas according to their own personal impressions, without regard to generally recognized rules, and while painting outdoors in an effort to render changing effects of light and reflection with striking immediacy.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The human figure has always fascinated oil painter Mark Reitz, but not in the classical sense. Rather, he stretches the boundaries of representational art, making bodies a blur in his dreamy, illusive abstractions. That is apparent in pieces such as Group Study, an oil-on-paper work that recently won the Violet Oakley Prize in the Woodmere Art Museum's 54th annual Members' Exhibition, on view at the Chestnut Hill museum through Aug. 28. Reitz's painting is among the work of more than 300 museum members exhibiting in the non-juried, multimedia show, which includes paintings, drawings, sculptures and prints.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Frances Galante's home, a portrait she painted of the Maine countryside hangs prominently. It's the kind of work that would stop visiting friends. Some would ask questions; most would admire. Ms. Galante always would be humble. "She would say, 'My paintings aren't that great,' or, 'This still needs work,' " said Linda Galante, her sister. "But I know so many people who would look at her art and start crying because it was so moving. " Ms. Galante, 57, a prominent painter in the region, died Tuesday, March 10, in her Philadelphia home after a long battle with ovarian cancer.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | Thomas Hine, For The Inquirer
You could argue that it is too soon to look at and think about Free Interpretation of Plant Forms , the monumental sculptural fountain that recently appeared, overnight, on the front lawn of the Woodmere Art Museum in Chestnut Hill. After all, the four-ton work is still behind a construction fence. The landscaping around it is unfinished. The water element of the fountain is not operating, and its design hasn't even been set because Woodmere's administrators expect to experiment to determine what looks and works best.
NEWS
September 1, 2013 | By Megan Lydon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia native Patricia Leslie Noonan, 66, who spent years as a volunteer at the Woodmere Art Museum, died Aug. 19 after a fall in her home in Amelia Island, Fla., her family said. A tireless volunteer, Mrs. Noonan also worked for Springside Chestnut Hill Academy and William Penn Charter School, and the Chestnut Hill Musical Cocktails, one of the Philadelphia Orchestra's fund-raising committees. After graduating from Harriton High School, she went to Washington College and afterward earned her master's in education at Tufts University.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Georgia S. McWhinney, 85, of Wyncote, an associate professor in the field of literacy, died Wednesday, May 20, of cancer at her home. Dr. McWhinney devoted her energies to her family and the study and teaching of emergent literacy in both children and adults. Emergent literacy , a term coined by researcher Marie Clay, refers to the gradual process by which children and adults interact with language, books, and those around them on the road to literacy. A part of the process is speaking, listening, writing, and viewing words and pictures.
NEWS
September 23, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Lear's art might have saved him from harm's way during World War II. A niece, Susan MacBride, recalled yesterday that when he was assigned to Fort Riley, Kan., "the generals and the officers found out he was an artist [and] diverted his talents to doing portraits of the officers and their families. " Later, she said, he was assigned to illustrate military manuals, booklets and charts for service-wide distribution. On Wednesday, John Brock Lear Jr., 98, artist and teacher, died of pneumonia at Chestnut Hill Hospital.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | John Timpane
Here are a few outstanding museum and gallery shows you should not miss this summer. Creative Africa (Through Sept. 25, Philadelphia Museum of Art) This big show is simply a revelation - the visionary work of artists throughout Africa, from contemporary photography, fashion, and architecture to centuries-old sculpture. Also programs, artist talks, family festivals, and community conversations. (215-763-8100, philamuseum.org ) Daylight Harmony: Larry Francis (Through June 30, Gross McCleaf Gallery)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Although he's a relatively obscure figure in standard histories of American art, James D. Smillie (1833-1909) was a superb reproductive engraver and etcher. Abundant evidence of his skill emerges in a retrospective of his graphic work at the Woodmere Art Museum, organized by director Michael W. Schantz. As Schantz points out in a catalogue essay, Smillie's career paralleled the development of printmaking in the 19th century. He began as a line engraver and at the turn of the century became a leading figure in the etching revival.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The recent traveling exhibition of baseball images called "Diamonds Are Forever" demonstrated that while sports and recreation have long been popular subjects for American artists, they have produced relatively little memorable art. "Sport in Art" at the Woodmere Art Museum in Chestnut Hill reaches a similar conclusion. Its scope - from baseball and football to rowing, tennis and auto racing - is much broader, but it, too, leads a viewer to conclude that sports do not translate readily into high art. Television and the other mass media have made even the most obscure sports commonplace, and they document them in such detail that there isn't much left for art to chew on. But it's also likely that few artists have been able to dig below the surface of these mass entertainments, which is why most sporting art seems cliched.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | Thomas Hine, For The Inquirer
You could argue that it is too soon to look at and think about Free Interpretation of Plant Forms , the monumental sculptural fountain that recently appeared, overnight, on the front lawn of the Woodmere Art Museum in Chestnut Hill. After all, the four-ton work is still behind a construction fence. The landscaping around it is unfinished. The water element of the fountain is not operating, and its design hasn't even been set because Woodmere's administrators expect to experiment to determine what looks and works best.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | John Timpane
Here are a few outstanding museum and gallery shows you should not miss this summer. Creative Africa (Through Sept. 25, Philadelphia Museum of Art) This big show is simply a revelation - the visionary work of artists throughout Africa, from contemporary photography, fashion, and architecture to centuries-old sculpture. Also programs, artist talks, family festivals, and community conversations. (215-763-8100, philamuseum.org ) Daylight Harmony: Larry Francis (Through June 30, Gross McCleaf Gallery)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2016
Repertory Films Annenberg Center - Bruce Montgomery Theatre 3680 Walnut St.; 215-898-6701. www.annenbergcenter.org . Twenty Feet From Stardom (2013) 4/19. 7 pm. Bryn Mawr Film Institute 824 W. Lancaster Ave., Bryn Mawr; 610-527-9898. www.brynmawrfilm.org . Internet Cat Video Festival. $12; $9 seniors; $8 students. 4/20. 6 pm. Colonial Theatre 227 Bridge St., Phoenixville; 610-917-1228. www.thecolonialtheatre.com . Stop Making Sense (1984) $9; $7 seniors and students with ID; $5 children 12 and under.
NEWS
January 5, 2016 | BY DAN GERINGER, Staff Writer
CLIFFORD WARD, a Center City artist whose sculptures draw heavily on the African diaspora, said the exhibit "We Speak: Black Artists of Philadelphia, 1920s-1970s" at the Woodmere Art Museum in Chestnut Hill will open a lot of eyes - including his. Ward, who has spent several years sculpting 7-foot-tall warriors (12 of them - "almost like an army") for a future museum installation, said that although the African diaspora has informed much of his work, he was unfamiliar with Philadelphia's black artists from those decades.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent and the Woodmere Art Museum are exploring a partnership that could produce a merged institution devoted to exhibiting more than three centuries' worth of the region's entire range of art and artifacts, according to officials at both institutions. The exploration process, funded by William Penn Foundation grants of $867,075 to each institution, will initially lead to a joint public exhibition opening in about a year at both, tentatively titled "A More Perfect Union.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Willis "Frank" Bramblett Jr., 67, an artist and former professor at Temple's Tyler School of Art, died at his home in Plymouth Meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 29. He had lived with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis for several years. Born in Cumming, Ga., his father's hometown, Mr. Bramblett grew up in his mother's hometown of Wedowee, Ala. In his senior year at the University of Georgia, he married fellow student Karen Reid, then attended Yale University, completing his M.F.A. degree in 1972.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
A glance down the hallway toward the gallery of the Woodmere Art Museum, where its 74th Annual Juried Exhibition begins, reveals the quirky aesthetic of jurors and artist brothers Steven and Billy Dufala. In the distance, an enormous, featureless, off-white creature shaped like a cross between a duck and a sheep lies on the floor. Behind it is a large painting of two women standing side by side against a starry night, one holding an ungainly cloudlike form, the other's face hidden by a mass of droopy hair - or something like hair.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|