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Woody Allen

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NEWS
July 22, 1988 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
"September" is Woody Allen in his Ingmar Bergman mode. That is to say, Woody Allen with no laughs; Woody Allen seriously zeroing in on unhappy relationships. The theme is unrequited love and, in this film, there is quite a lot of that going around. Lane (Mia Farrow) has retreated to the family summer house in Vermont to recover from a suicide attempt. Howard (Denholm Elliott), a lonely widower who lives nearby, falls in love with her. But Lane has fallen for Peter (Sam Waterston)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1992 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Back in the days when Woody Allen made unadulterated (but adulterous) comedies, two of his funniest were Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex (But Were Afraid to Ask) (1972) and Love and Death (1975). They mark his transition from the parodist to filmmaker. Everything . . ., a hilarious riff on Dr. David Reuben's self-help book, has seven different episodes, each shot in the style of a different director. A personal favorite is the Stanley Kubrick-style futuristic sequence with Burt Reynolds as a reluctant sperm.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1992 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's usual to write a biography about an icon who is young and hot or old and dead. So why do one on Woody Allen, age 56 and neither red-hot nor stone-cold? For another good reason: Allen has had a very rich 40-year career in show business. It started with his days as a teenager sending in gags to newspaper columnists. In his early 20s, he was pulling down $1,700 a week writing for The Garry Moore Show. In his mid-20s, he chucked it all to do stand-up comedy for $25 a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2012 | BY STEVEN ZEITCHIK, Los Angeles Times
TORONTO - It's been a long time since Woody Allen acted in a film he didn't direct. It's probably even longer - as in never - since he's played a pimp. The 76-year-old will do just that in "Fading Gigolo," a movie conceived and written by John Turturro. Turturro will direct and - of course - play the hooker. The johns? Those would be Sofia Vergara, Vanessa Paradis and Sharon Stone. There were plenty of highly touted Hollywood movies at the Toronto International Film Festival. But somewhat below the radar were a number of projects, such as "Fading Gigolo," that are seeking attention within the industry as their principals talk them up to distributors.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1998 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Old-timey music (Little Jack Little singing "You Ought to Be in Pictures"), tasteful white-on-black credits . . . yup, two seconds into it and you know it's a new Woody Allen film. Funny thing, though: The guy playing the self-obsessed, libido-driven, having-a-midlife-crisis protagonist - a successful magazine journalist by the name of Lee Simon - sounds like Woody, but he sure doesn't look like him. In an act of mimicry that is at once remarkable and remarkably distracting, Kenneth Branagh stars as the filmmaker's alter ego, using the whole array of Woodyesque gestures and speech patterns (the flailing hands, the angsty gab, the by-way-of-Brooklyn accent)
NEWS
October 14, 1989 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press and the New York Daily News
Woody Allen leaped to the defense of Jackie Mason Thursday night in a most unlikely setting - a Big Apple Democratic fund-raising event for mayoral candidate David Dinkins. Dinkens stiffened noticeably when Allen brought the subject up. "I think that he's in no way racially prejudiced, that he was just joking," the filmmaker said of Mason, who, among other things, said Jews vote for blacks out of guilt. "These are the same jokes that he's always made. The press was pious and foolish, and you know that he got a raw deal.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
With funny situations, some excellent one-liners, interesting and amusing supporting actors and well-drawn dialogue, The Marshall Chronicles has only one problem: Its central character grates your brain with his continual, third-rate imitation of an adolescent Woody Allen. Beginning tonight, the new ABC series sends Anything but Love on hiatus and takes over its time slot, Wednesdays at 9:30 (Channel 6). Chronicles is a cross between Head of the Class and The Wonder Years, with Joshua Rifkind playing Marshall Brightman, a New York teenager who turns to the camera five or six times a show to explain the nature of his angst.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Woody Allen , 78, on Sunday lashed out against allegations by his adopted daughter Dylan Farrow , 28, that the American film icon sexually molested her when she was 7 years old. Allen was reacting to an open letter by Dylan published in Saturday's New York Times. In explicit detail, the letter recounts several instances of alleged abuse. "Woody Allen took me by the hand and led me into a dim, closetlike attic on the second floor of our house," Dylan writes of an alleged 1992 incident at the family's Connecticut home.
NEWS
July 1, 1998 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
"Apparently, they were doing fine until he rented 'G.I. Jane' and she rented 'The Jackal.'" - Conan O'Brien, weighing in on the Bruce Willis-Demi Moore split Here's an unexpected new chapter in the nasty saga of Woody Allen and Mia Farrow. Yesterday, the filmmaker wondered plaintively why he hadn't been invited to Monday's funeral of Farrow's mother, Maureen O'Sullivan. Our guess: Something to do with Allen's sleeping with O'Sullivan's daughter and granddaughter at the same time.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A big week for new arrivals at your video store includes the latest from Woody Allen, a psychological drama starring Faye Dunaway, another consideration of the effects the Vietnam War had on those who fought it, a bittersweet tale of a fading high school hero and an odd rethinking of the opera Carmen. ANOTHER WOMAN (1988) (Orion) $89.98. 81 minutes. Gena Rowlands, Ian Holm, Gene Hackman, Mia Farrow. Instead of being a homage to Ingmar Bergman, Woody Allen's sobering study of a cold academic who finds it impossible to live a life of the mind and ignore the heart actually plays like a Bergman film.
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NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For the Daily News
Woody Allen's affinity for gypsy jazz is obvious to anyone who has seen - or just listened to - his films. The director has used Django Reinhardt's music on his sound tracks at least as far back as 1980's Stardust Memories , and his 1999 movie Sweet and Lowdown stars Sean Penn as a shiftless guitarist who both worships and envies the legendary guitarist. So it says something that when Allen wanted a distinctly French jazz guitar sound for his time-traveling 2011 Midnight in Paris , he turned to Stephane Wrembel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
The Hollywood of the 1930s - swank watering holes, Deco manses, pristine beaches, roofs of Spanish tile - has never looked so good. If Woody Allen gets one thing right in Café Society , his 47th (!) feature, it's the hiring of cinematographer Vittorio Storaro. But maybe even that was a mistake. Enlisting the director of photography of such seared-in-memory masterworks as Apocalypse Now and The Conformist only reinforces how forgettable just about everything, and everyone, in Café Society is/are.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Clooney: Dude, I'll save America! Renowned political analyst and sometime actor George Clooney was in France on Thursday to assure our European allies America is on the right track. "There's not going to be a President Donald Trump ," said Clooney, who established his bona fides directing David Strathairn as newsman Edward R. Murrow in Good Night, and Good Luck (and appearing as producer Fred Friendly). "That's not going to happen. " Clooney, 55 , spoke at the Cannes Film Festival, where he's hawking his pic Money Monster . He received big applause for attacking Trump as a fearmonger.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Bad taste: Woody Allen joke Ah! The Cannes Film Festival, bastion of art, high learning and . . . rape jokes. Just ask Woody Allen . The auteur on Wednesday had the honor of opening the fest with his new pic, Café Society . But honor wasn't exactly on the mind of French actor Laurent Lafitte , who hosted the fest's opening ceremony. "It gives me pleasure to see you because you've filmed so much in Europe and you haven't even been convicted of rape in the U.S.A.," Lafitte said, referring to decades-long accusations that Allen, 80, sexually abused his adopted daughter Dylan Farrow . Lafitte compared Allen to Roman Polanski , who fled to Europe after being convicted in America of raping a teen.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | Chuck Darrow, Daily News
It's not unusual to leave a Broadway musical humming a tune or two. But starting Tuesday, those heading into the Academy of Music to see "Bullets Over Broadway" (here through Nov. 1) might have some of its songs running through their heads before the show starts, even if they haven't seen it before. That's because the score to the musical comedy based on Woody Allen's 1994 film of the same name is culled from what is commonly referred to as the "Great American Songbook. " Rather than commission a new set of songs for the comic tale of a 1920s playwright who makes a Faustian bargain with a gangster to get his new piece produced, Allen and director-choreographer Susan Stroman decided to populate the score with era-appropriate classics.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2015
U SHER IS MAKING things official with longtime girlfriend, business partner and - three cheers! - older woman Grace Miguel . Miguel, 44, was spotted with a major rock on her ring finger on New Year's Eve, when Usher, 36, performed in Miami, and at Sunday's Golden Globes awards show. The couple hasn't confirmed. But when you know, you know.   NBC-ya later Two-and-a-half years after her tearful on-air goodbye to "Today," Ann Curry appears to be flying the peacock coop for reals.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
AS IF the Israel vs. Hamas battle didn't lead to enough Internet name-calling, the comments sections are about to add a celebrity angle. The U.N.'s three-member commission on possible violations of the rules of war in Gaza will include George Clooney 's fiancee, British-Lebanese lawyer Amal Alamuddin . The president of the 47-nation U.N. Human Rights Council announced the appointments yesterday. Alamuddin is a London-based international-law specialist and former legal adviser to the prosecutor of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
WHEN LAST HE visited the subject of mystics, Woody Allen gave us the curdled "You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger. " In that movie, magical thinking was for the small-minded, and happiness itself was for the desperate and delusional. "Magic in the Moonlight" has caught Allen in an improved "Midnight in Paris" mood, and he's made a better movie, or at least one that gives us a less cynical take on the possibility of earthly contentment. There's hope, he suggests, even for misanthropes and skeptics.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
No secret: Zach Braff is a Woody Allen fan. Braff's 2004 emo indie, Garden State , which he wrote, produced, directed, and starred in (opposite Natalie Portman ), drew comparisons to Annie Hall , to Manhattan . More than 10 years before that, a teenage Braff had a small part in Allen's Manhattan Murder Mystery , as the progeny of Allen and Diane Keaton's characters. So, landing the lead role in Bullets Over Broadway , the Tony-nominated musical adapted from Allen's 1994 comedy, was "a dream come true" for the actor.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Rather than presenting one dramatically large video installation, as they did for their last show at Locks Gallery, in 2012, the filmmaking team of Matthew Suib and Nadia Hironaka now have taken the opposite approach. Their current show at Locks, "Mirrors, Marks & Loops," is a cineaste's dream and my idea of the perfect visual torment: six videos, all running continuously in the ground-floor gallery. But Suib and Hironaka have become so good at what they do - making ambitious, witty films that play on the history of the moving image, among other things - that I soon found myself sitting in the dark on various cubes distributed throughout the gallery, watching each video from beginning to end. I think I may have seen the largest of them, Ascension (With Cat)
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