CollectionsWoody Guthrie
IN THE NEWS

Woody Guthrie

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
'How could a show about Woody Guthrie go wrong at a theater called 'the People's Light?' " Performer and show cocreator David M. Lutken posed that question in his slow drawl as part of the preshow warm-up for Woody Sez: The Life and Music of Woody Guthrie . Now imagine that sentence again. Hear it as coming from a man smart enough to want to keep you guessing about his intelligence. Slow down the cadence of words to a near halt at the word "wrong. " Leave the listener (that's you)
LIVING
January 9, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Shortly after the end of World War II, a young Philadelphia woman named Charlotte Straus was so taken with Woody Guthrie's book Bound for Glory that she wrote the folk singer, then a private in the armed forces serving at various U.S. installations. His reply, a letter dated Oct. 29, 1945, grew into a yearlong correspondence that was surprisingly intimate and came to include autograph material and ephemera Guthrie sent her, notably a typewritten short story and eight pages of song lyrics and drawings.
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Sam Adams, FOR THE INQUIRER
New Multitudes , the album on which Jay Farrar, Jim James, Anders Parker and Will Johnson set unused Woody Guthrie lyrics to music, is a work of intimate mystery, born of hours in the archives and sentiments that Guthrie himself either abandoned or left buried on purpose. But on stage at Union Transfer Tuesday night, the songs burst into the public sphere, pushing private thoughts into the open and converting whispers to a full-blooded shout. The four musicians, who took equal time at the microphone, have worked together in numerous configurations - Farrar and Parker in Gob Iron, James and Johnson in Monsters of Folk - but with disparate public profiles.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2002 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For too many people, Woody Guthrie is freeze-dried in history as the populist heartland folkie who composed "This Land Is Your Land," and was a mentor to Bob Dylan. At least that is what his daughter believes. "Everybody has to get off this black-and-white, sepia-toned, Dust-Bowl-balladeer image," said Nora Guthrie, executive director of New York's Woody Guthrie Foundation and Archives. "He's very colorful. " She would know, and not just because she was raised by him. The archives are home to more than 3,000 sets of original Woody Guthrie lyrics.
NEWS
October 28, 1991 | Arthur J. Esterling
QUOTABLE The two most powerful rulers are time and patience. - Leo Tolstoy. What the mind can conceive, anyone can achieve. - Langston Hughes. Luck is when preparation meets with opportunity. - Vince Lombardi. An optimist is a misinformed pessimist. - Anonymous. Hell is where the give-uppers go. - Gail Warnock, 94-year-old author. Sorry don't get the hay in. - Woody Guthrie. The world breaks everyone, and afterward, many are strong at the broken places.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2011
Music Buck 65. Straight outta Nova Scotia, Buck 65 is the nom de rap of veteran alt-hip-hopper Rich Terfry, a clever and tough-minded lyricist adept at sprinkling Woody Guthrie roots-music flava and French chansonniere into his crafty beats and rhymes. On the new 20 Odd Years, the burly-voiced former minor-league baseball prospect covers Leonard Cohen's "Who by Fire," takes vocal assistance from fellow Canuck Jenn Grant, Gord Downie of the Tragically Hip, and Nick Thorburn of Islands, and skillfully tells tall tales with a dexterity that's rare among rock or rap songwriters, north or south of the Canadian border.
NEWS
October 14, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Ry Cooder's reputation is built on his virtuosity on slide guitar, along with a mastery of other guitar styles. (He's been in Rolling Stone's Top 10 guitarists of all time.) In addition, he's a musicologist par excellence who played with Taj Mahal as a teenager, taught Keith Richards the blues tuning he used to write many of the Rolling Stones' greatest songs, and put together the Cuban supergroup Buena Vista Social Club in 1996. You don't think of Cooder principally as a socially conscious storyteller or protest singer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2011 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
FAMILIAR FACES emerge in different guises in this week's new music roundup. HALL PASS: When the lead singer/composer in an established band strikes out on his own, even longtime fans don't always make the connection. Daryl Hall fights those odds again, minus longtime partner John Oates, in "Laughing Down Crying" (Verve/Forecast, A-) . If you relish Hall & Oates' vibrant take on rock 'n' soul, you're gonna find this shiny solo set (Hall's first in a decade) equally appealing.
NEWS
October 25, 2004 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Introducing "Christmas in Washington" Saturday night at the Electric Factory, Steve Earle proclaimed, "It's important to vote, it's important to agitate, it's important to be informed, but you know what - it's also important that you sing. " While he quipped that the audience's voices were "feeble" during the sing-along portion of his ode to Woody Guthrie, Earle let his songs do the agitating throughout his nearly 2 1/2-hour performance. The 30-song set drew heavily from his recent overtly political work, including all of the current The Revolution Starts Now and much of 2002's Jerusalem.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
'How could a show about Woody Guthrie go wrong at a theater called 'the People's Light?' " Performer and show cocreator David M. Lutken posed that question in his slow drawl as part of the preshow warm-up for Woody Sez: The Life and Music of Woody Guthrie . Now imagine that sentence again. Hear it as coming from a man smart enough to want to keep you guessing about his intelligence. Slow down the cadence of words to a near halt at the word "wrong. " Leave the listener (that's you)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writer
Time-tested and traditional American music sounds freshly invigorated and deeply personal in the hands of Alynda Lee Segarra. She's the front woman of the New Orleans folk band Hurray for the Riff Raff, which plays World Cafe Live tonight. They have emerged with Small Town Heroes , a sterling set of Segarra-penned originals. It's the band's fifth full-length release but its first to reach a wide audience. Attention-grabbing performances at last year's Newport Folk Festival and this year's South by Southwest have put a spotlight on Segarra, 27, a New York-born singer of Puerto Rican descent who is impressively adept at putting a modern spin on vintage roots-music forms.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Pete Seeger, 94, the folksinger and social-justice advocate who popularized "We Shall Overcome" as an anthem of the civil-rights movement, wrote "Turn! Turn! Turn!", and had a career spanning more than seven decades, has died. Kitama Cahill-Jackson, the singer's grandson, told the Associated Press that Mr. Seeger died in his sleep about 9:30 p.m. Monday at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he had been for six days. President Obama praised the man Carl Sandburg once called "America's tuning fork": "Over the years, Pete used his voice - and his hammer - to strike blows for workers' rights and civil rights; world peace and environmental conservation.
NEWS
October 14, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Ry Cooder's reputation is built on his virtuosity on slide guitar, along with a mastery of other guitar styles. (He's been in Rolling Stone's Top 10 guitarists of all time.) In addition, he's a musicologist par excellence who played with Taj Mahal as a teenager, taught Keith Richards the blues tuning he used to write many of the Rolling Stones' greatest songs, and put together the Cuban supergroup Buena Vista Social Club in 1996. You don't think of Cooder principally as a socially conscious storyteller or protest singer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
New Multitudes , the album on which Jay Farrar, Jim James, Anders Parker, and Will Johnson set unused Woody Guthrie lyrics to music, is a work of intimate mystery, born of hours in the archives and sentiments that Guthrie himself either abandoned or left buried on purpose. But on stage at Union Transfer Tuesday night, the songs burst into the public sphere, pushing private thoughts into the open and converting whispers to a full-blooded shout. The four musicians, who took equal time at the microphone, have worked together in numerous configurations - Farrar and Parker in Gob Iron, James and Johnson in Monsters of Folk - but with disparate public profiles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2011 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
FAMILIAR FACES emerge in different guises in this week's new music roundup. HALL PASS: When the lead singer/composer in an established band strikes out on his own, even longtime fans don't always make the connection. Daryl Hall fights those odds again, minus longtime partner John Oates, in "Laughing Down Crying" (Verve/Forecast, A-) . If you relish Hall & Oates' vibrant take on rock 'n' soul, you're gonna find this shiny solo set (Hall's first in a decade) equally appealing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2011
Music Buck 65. Straight outta Nova Scotia, Buck 65 is the nom de rap of veteran alt-hip-hopper Rich Terfry, a clever and tough-minded lyricist adept at sprinkling Woody Guthrie roots-music flava and French chansonniere into his crafty beats and rhymes. On the new 20 Odd Years, the burly-voiced former minor-league baseball prospect covers Leonard Cohen's "Who by Fire," takes vocal assistance from fellow Canuck Jenn Grant, Gord Downie of the Tragically Hip, and Nick Thorburn of Islands, and skillfully tells tall tales with a dexterity that's rare among rock or rap songwriters, north or south of the Canadian border.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2009 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
The Walnut Street Theatre presents Laura Ingalls Wilder on Saturday, a musical based on the story of the Wilder family's trek across the country. Laura, her parents, and her older sister Mary travel across the unsettled frontier of the late 19th-century American Midwest. They hope to find their "little house on the prairie," but the family's bonds are tested by scarlet fever, threatened eviction, and other hardships. But their strong devotion to one another allows them to overcome the challenges.
LIVING
January 9, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Shortly after the end of World War II, a young Philadelphia woman named Charlotte Straus was so taken with Woody Guthrie's book Bound for Glory that she wrote the folk singer, then a private in the armed forces serving at various U.S. installations. His reply, a letter dated Oct. 29, 1945, grew into a yearlong correspondence that was surprisingly intimate and came to include autograph material and ephemera Guthrie sent her, notably a typewritten short story and eight pages of song lyrics and drawings.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|