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Wool

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FOOD
March 16, 1988 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Would you kindly provide the directions for processing woolen coating material into "boiled wool?" I'd like to make a jacket from this fabric. - F.C.G. Dear F.C.G.: Many of us have made "boiled wool" inadvertently by washing woolens in a machine full of hot water and drying them in a hot dryer! But the following directions come from Handwoven magazine. Use a 100-percent wool fabric with a loose, big weave. (For real boiled wool, the fabric should be woven, but you can get a similar effect with loosely knitted fabric.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1992 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sherry and Martin Shulewitz have spent the last four years weaving a business out of other people's leftovers. From old woolen blankets and bits of cashmere, tweed and even the end pieces of men's suits, their small company, Heritage Rugs, of Lahaska, Bucks County, produces traditional Colonial rag rugs on century-old looms. And what makes the business unusual is that each rug is made to the customer's specifications. Rag rugs were born in the 18th century in "the good old American tradition of waste not, want not," much in the same way patchwork quilts came about, Sherry Shulewitz said.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Flecks of green and gold glitter, which she had tossed in her hair, sparkled while Ellie Laird worked intently to wind a lumpy length of gray yarn around a wooden dowel, flush against a 3-inch wooden disk. Then the girl, almost 9, attached the end of the yarn to a notch at the top of the dowel, added another puff of wool to the already spun yarn and set the tool, called a drop spindle, spinning to twist more yarn. "Open and close, that's all these fingers do," said Nancy Wyatt, a spinner and weaver from Exton, as she showed Ellie how to control the spinning motion and feed the wool.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2000 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ever shear a sheep? You can watch how they do it Saturday at the Howell Living History Farm near Lambertville at the 17th annual "Shear Fun" event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Sheep-shearings are scheduled next weekend in Ridley Creek State Park and Elverson. See below.) I visited the farm the other day and got a how-to-shear-a-sheep lesson from Gary Houghton, the farm manager. There's a technique to it because a full-grown sheep weighs 200 to 300 pounds. OK, first thing you do, Houghton said, is grab the sheep.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1993 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the hat business, it is tough to get ahead. The wool fedora long ago went the way of spats and morning coats. But one of the world's largest hat companies is still making wool felt hats here near Lancaster. The Bollman Hat Co. has been at it for 125 years. You would have to be a bit mad to become a hatter today. A traditional felt hat is a complex, labor-intensive product, bound by antique technology and vulnerable to the whims of fashion. Hats are not made by newcomers, but by survivors.
NEWS
March 9, 2008 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Crafting has been on the crest of a huge wave, with dedicated Web sites, "stitch-n-bitch" sewing circles, and patterns that run the gamut from the bunnies and mushrooms you sewed with your mom to swallows and pinups cribbed from Sailor Jerry. But the newest needle craft - that's right, after all this time, there's a new one - is needle felting, the process of sculpting raw wool into two- and three-dimensional items that range from hats and purses to small dogs to strangely popular trolls and elves.
NEWS
March 21, 1989 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
The funniest moment at the Chanel collection occurred before the show when a chic Parisienne, dressed in head-to-toe Chanel, marched in with a folding chair tucked under her arm. She positioned herself in a prime location, opened the chair, sat down and refused to budge. While Chanel groupies may be better dressed and more ingenious than the flotsam and jetsam at the Gaultier or Montana shows, they are just as eager to see what innovations their favorite designer has wrought.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1993 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since the 1880s, the Wilde family has been making woolen carpet yarn in a mill built into the side of a steep hill in Manayunk. Once, the John Wilde & Brother mill was one of dozens of textile plants lining Main Street. Today, only Wilde remains. If there is to be a fifth generation of Wilde descendants operating the massive carding and spinning machines in the old stone factory, it will only be if the current keepers of the family tradition can develop more niche markets for their wool.
NEWS
June 3, 1994 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Mayor Rendell peers at Dolly, a sheep brought to City Hall by students and faculty from W.B. Saul High School of Agricultural Sciences, who gave Rendell a lesson in sheep-shearing yesterday in anticipation of the 10-day Philadelphia County Fair that begins today in Fairmount Park. Bill McFadden (right) gives the mayor tips on proper technique. The school won't get rich on the estimated five pounds of wool cut off Dolly, a 5-year-old ewe: Teachers said wool yields no more than about 60 cents a pound.
NEWS
January 4, 2013
WINTER HAS arrived, and the weather has brought out some cool coats. I'm seeing puffy parkas, long wool overcoats, colorful ski jackets and warm fur collars on fashionable Philly men and women. Bundling up in style is always the way go.     Email: Bigrube@streetgazing.com On Twitter: @BigRubeHarley Blog: streetgazing.com  
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
LANSDALE On the first beautiful spring weekend of the year, it was hard to tell who was enjoying the day more - all the kids running around from one activity to another, or their parents, just glad to be out of the house. "Being inside all winter was not the best," said Gena Ortega, 34, of North Wales, who came with Lily, 6, and Laila, 22 months, to the Peter Wentz Farmstead's annual Sheep Shearing Day. About 1,000 visitors came to see the farm's five ewes and one ram get their spring haircuts at the public park in Lansdale.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2013 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
To understand why Don Rongione wants people to buy American on Tuesday - American Made Matters Day - put yourself on the factory floor of Bollman Hat Co., where on Friday the president and chief executive watched Tony Lehman fashion wool felt into a tuxedo-ready top hat. Tugging on finely crafted Texas wool felt as if it were hosiery, Lehman pulled the black fabric around a mold of wood blocks to form the sharply creased crown. That old-style skill, brought stateside by Germans, was one of the first things Lehman learned 31 years ago when he landed a job at Bollman, America's oldest hatmaker, outside Reading.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
For most people, felt belongs on the same shelf with pipe cleaners, to be used for craft projects: soft stuffed forms with glued-on googly eyes, or posters covered with a mishmash of vibrant letters. But in the last couple of years, wool's hardworking cousin has upgraded its fashion status, making its way into rugs, chairs, wall panels, and home accessories. Feel-good felt just hasn't felt better. "Craftsmen really like working with it for its simplicity," said Kelly Smith, cofounder of FilzFelt, a Boston-based company with a Center City office that imports felt and customizes pillows and rugs, and novelties like place mats, trivets, coasters, and table runners.
NEWS
January 4, 2013
WINTER HAS arrived, and the weather has brought out some cool coats. I'm seeing puffy parkas, long wool overcoats, colorful ski jackets and warm fur collars on fashionable Philly men and women. Bundling up in style is always the way go.     Email: Bigrube@streetgazing.com On Twitter: @BigRubeHarley Blog: streetgazing.com  
NEWS
April 1, 2011
By Michael T. Dolan I love practical jokes. Even before I could tie my shoes, I was tying unsuspecting family members' laces together. So began my career as a prankster - a profession that can sometimes prove hazardous to one's health and one's relationships, depending on the extent of the prank and the recipient's supply of goodwill at the time of its execution. Take, for example, the case of the kitchen-sink spray hose. Wrapping a rubber band tightly around its trigger causes water to shoot directly at any unsuspecting target who turns on the faucet.
NEWS
October 1, 2010 | By Caroline Tiger, For the Inquirer
Bring out the chunky knits, hefty wool, and other plush accessories for the home as we burrow into sweater weather. - Caroline Tiger Big knits The raw material for these hand-knitted Neo Baskets ($45-115) is a yarn made from neoprene, an industrial rubber. Available at momastore.org. Couch cozy Eleanor Pritchard's soft, luxurious Uniform Stripe Blanket ($325) was woven in a Welsh mill from pure new Scottish wool. Available at Petulia's Folly, 1710-12 Sansom St., and at its stall (No. 42)
SPORTS
April 11, 2010 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Party like it's 1965 Saturday was Turn Back the Clock Night at Minute Maid Park. And, no, not just because Jamie Moyer started for the Phillies. The Astros honored the 1965 team before the game - the first team that bore the name Astros. The Houston franchise was named the Colt .45s from 1962 to '64. The first Astros game ever was against the Phillies on April 12, 1965, at the Astrodome. Dick Allen homered and Chris Short earned the victory as the Phillies won, 2-0. Naturally, with the Phillies in town, the Astros decided both teams should wear throwback jerseys.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2009 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
It was an injured shoulder eight years ago that forced Anna Tumas to give up her beloved knitting, an art form she had learned growing up in Germany. So when she faced a very shrunken wool sweater after accidentally washing it in hot water, the lightbulb went on. For the last several years, this Cinnaminson woman has taken the loveliest old wool and cashmere sweaters she can find and recrafted them into baby sweaters. Shelves in her home workroom bulge with a rhapsody of pastels, brights, and occasional print sweaters seized like pirate's booty at thrift shops and yard sales.
NEWS
March 9, 2008 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Crafting has been on the crest of a huge wave, with dedicated Web sites, "stitch-n-bitch" sewing circles, and patterns that run the gamut from the bunnies and mushrooms you sewed with your mom to swallows and pinups cribbed from Sailor Jerry. But the newest needle craft - that's right, after all this time, there's a new one - is needle felting, the process of sculpting raw wool into two- and three-dimensional items that range from hats and purses to small dogs to strangely popular trolls and elves.
NEWS
February 28, 2007 | By Sharon Srodin
I'm a pessimistic person by nature. In extreme or risky situations, I expect bad things to happen. When I travel, I expect to encounter delays and lost luggage. I don't enter contests or buy lottery tickets, knowing that the odds are greatly stacked against me. I don't play the stock market and I'm not much of a gambler. The same holds true for my expectations about the weather. Growing up in New York and North Jersey, I learned to accept that winter meant months of frigid temperatures, endless shoveling of driveways, dangerous commutes, and being stuck inside until you were literally climbing the walls.
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