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Work Ethic

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SPORTS
September 30, 1995 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Skepticism trails relentlessly behind 7-6 Shawn Bradley, casting a shadow over whatever he does. It goes where he goes. It colors whatever he does. It will not go away any time soon. Bradley knows the drill. He is just back from nine days in Hollywood, part of the cast of a motion picture titled "Space Jam. " The characters range from Michael Jordan to Charles Barkley to Muggsy Bogues to Bugs Bunny. But all anyone in Philadelphia wanted to know was, why wasn't Bradley in the practice gym with the Sixers, working at his craft?
SPORTS
March 20, 2013 | By Nick Carroll, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is an electrical box in Franklinville that looks different from most in the area. It is dented and marked up and has the signature of Josh Awotunde, who also used the blank canvas of the box to profess his NFL dreams. Awotunde is probably not going to the NFL. He did start at quarterback for Delsea, the Group 3 state champion, but his future is in another sport: track and field. Last season as a junior, Awotunde won the discus and finished fourth in the shot put at the state Group 3 championships.
SPORTS
September 25, 1989 | By Jay Searcy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Early in the fourth quarter, when the Eagles were beginning to run down, when they were holding timidly to a 21-17 lead and John Teltschik punted short from the shadow of his goal posts, it appeared that another football miracle was in the making at Veterans Stadium. The punt fell from the sky and bounced crazily into the back of unsuspecting San Francisco linebacker Bill Romanowski and into the hands of Henry "Gizmo" Williams of the Eagles. From there, the Eagles went on to score and take a 28-17 lead with just 8 minutes, 24 seconds remaining.
NEWS
July 22, 1987 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
From the mid-'70s through the early '80s, the critical word on Mark Harmon - who stars in the new Carl Reiner comedy, "Summer School," opening today at area theaters - was this: An ex-UCLA quarterback with bankable blue eyes, dazzling teeth and the acting talent of an ex-UCLA quarterback. For years, he scraped bottom in assembly-line Jack Webb TV productions and the horrendous nighttime soaper, "Flamingo Road. " Then, without warning, he emerged from Actor's Purgatory to deliver thoroughly believable performances as Dr. Bobby Caldwell, who undergoes a radical personality change, then suffers from AIDS on "St. Elsewhere"; astronaut Sam Crawford, who wins and then loses Maddie Hayes on "Moonlighting," and sex murderer Ted Bundy in the NBC mini-series, "The Deliberate Stranger.
SPORTS
October 18, 1994 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
John Chaney likes to say Aaron McKie has teeth in his stomach. "Moxie, toughness, inner strength," said Chaney, the Temple basketball coach who didn't know whether to laugh or cry when McKie completed his career last season, going to Portland as the No. 17 pick in the NBA draft. "I don't think you can say he has super-duper skills, but there's a great player inside him. A winner. " If that's the label attached to McKie, a 6-4 shooting guard, he's grateful. It beats being remembered as a Proposition 48, a kid from Simon Gratz High who couldn't crack 700 in the Scholastic Achievement Test, which cost him a season of eligibility with the Owls.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | By Joshua Klein, Special to The Inquirer
Just after Northern Burlington coach Joe Janney enjoyed his first winning season as girls' basketball coach, he's back in the rebuilding process. Four starters graduated and the remainder of his bench players are gone. He does have a couple of players back who saw some varsity playing time last year, but hardly enough to gain much experience or a letter. Many of the younger players are getting their first opportunity to play organized basketball because there is no junior high program.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
The music on Kurt Vile's new album, Wakin on a Pretty Daze , is deeply relaxed and absolutely confident in its laid-back, stretched-out, fingerpicked trance vibe. So much so that it would be perfectly reasonable to assume that the Philadelphia rocker is a prototypical stoner dude. Reasonable perhaps, but incorrect. Sure, Kurt Vile - yes, that's his real name - looks the part. He's the guy with the past-his-shoulders hair to rival The Addams Family 's Cousin Itt, and who sat down to talk on a recent morning at the Rocket Cat Café in Kensington, up the street from the four-story-tall mural that provides the cover image for Wakin (Matador ***1/2)
SPORTS
December 7, 1992 | By Brian Freeman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At old Media High School, Penncrest coach Doug Randolph could have been considered a legend. He was a three-sport star there before moving on to Delaware State, where he again lettered in football, basketball and baseball. He was drafted by the Houston Oilers in football and by the Cincinnati Reds in baseball. Randolph even made it to double-A baseball in the Reds' chain as a shortstop. So when it comes to winning, Randolph knows a little something about the subject. As Randolph gets ready to start his second season as the Lions' coach, he hopes some of his work ethic and knowledge will rub off on his players.
SPORTS
June 15, 2003 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In the baseball world, Chris Lubanski has been turning heads for a long time. Luke McNichol recalled when Lubanski, a star outfielder from Kennedy-Kenrick High School in Norristown, attended an instructional camp at West Chester University nearly a decade ago. "They called him 'The Human Line Drive,' " said McNichol, the head coach at West Chester Henderson. "You threw the ball in to him and he lined it right back out at you. " It was that way most of this season. The 6-foot-3, 190-pound senior, who last week was selected fifth overall by the Kansas City Royals in major-league baseball's amateur draft, hit .528 (38 for 72)
SPORTS
June 19, 2011 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Timber Creek football coach Rob Hinson thinks people have the wrong idea about Damiere Byrd. "There's a big misconception out there," Hinson said. "People think he's this guy who has been naturally blessed with all this speed, and they think that's where his success comes from. They don't realize how hard this kid works. " Timber Creek track coach Chris Grottini says the same thing about Byrd, in different words: "He doesn't take his talent for granted. He's the last one to leave the track at practice.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
When Bill Cumby Jr. and his father, Bill Sr., started W.S. Cumby Inc. in 1981, they began it as a union general contracting and project management company. "In 1981, if you wanted to do our kind of work - good-quality commercial work - you were a union contractor," said Cumby Jr., 66, who took over as president in 1998. By the late 1980s and early 1990s, father and son switched to a merit shop (non-union) business, repudiating their contracts with the unions for carpenters and laborers.
NEWS
March 5, 2016
ISSUE | PA. BUDGET STALEMATE Thwarting the farmers of tomorrow I am a 13-year-old member of the Delaware County 4-H Club, which is funded by one of Pennsylvania State University's extension offices. Without the $46 million appropriation for agricultural programs in the 2015-'16 state budget, 4-H Clubs and the Master Gardener program will be shut down ("Threat of layoffs at Penn State," Saturday). The 4-H Club has opened doors for me and many others. My dream is to live on a farm or work in the poultry industry.
SPORTS
February 4, 2016 | By Aaron Carter, Staff Writer
Wednesday's signing-day celebration will represent the culmination of Imhotep senior Andre Mintze's hard work and determination. If the Vanderbilt football recruit has his way, however, it will not represent a day off. Despite coach Albie Crosby's saying Mintze would likely not participate in Wednesday's morning workout, the 6-foot-4, 227-pound senior has other plans. "It's just a regular day," said Mintze, who plans to sign and fax his paperwork after the workout. "Festivities are at the end of the day. But, you know, 'Greatness is not owned.
SPORTS
January 28, 2016 | BY LES BOWEN, Staff Writer
MOBILE, Ala. - Before he was so rudely interrupted a year ago, Howie Roseman was trying to build an atmosphere in which players drafted by the Eagles would stay with the Eagles, would feel valued by the organization, and would build valuable continuity for the team. Roseman, back in charge of Eagles personnel after a yearlong hiatus at the insistence of former coach Chip Kelly, is moving to re-establish that initiative this week with new deals for the team's top two tight ends, Zach Ertz (five years, $42.5 million, on Monday)
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Lawrence A. Brown Sr. retired as a Cape May mail carrier, he didn't just watch the waves. "He worked in local restaurants as a prep cook," his daughter, Kelly Ann, said. Mr. Brown was in the kitchens at the former À La Carte in the late 1980s, the Washington Inn in the early 1990s, and the Union Park after that, she said. Why that job in those locations? "He followed his children," she said. In each place, while he was doing prep work, "I was a food server and my brothers were cooks.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN YOU entered Solomon West's home in Mount Airy, you were greeted by a portrait of a man in a Naval uniform. The subject was Solomon West. And the artist was Solomon West. Solomon was a man of many talents, a hardworking guy driven by a work ethic that wouldn't quit. Art, especially portrait-painting, was how he relaxed from his career as an electrician, at the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and Amtrak. Wherever he went, from the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz, on which he served in the Navy, to his civilian jobs, Solomon was frequently honored for his dedication to his duties and reluctance ever to take a day off. Solomon West, whose many interests also included gardening, cooking, winemaking and fishing, all roles that he threw himself into with a passionate dedication to detail, died Friday after a short illness.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: I have this overwhelming anger or jealousy toward my younger brother because of how "easily" his life seems to come for him. One example: I paid for community college on my own, and when I decided to go to a university, my parents cosigned for a semester but said I needed to figure it out after that. I could not afford it so I joined the military to get education benefits as well as health insurance. Now, two years post-military, I am finally able to use my education benefits.
SPORTS
June 8, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a question lobbed from a starstruck teacher standing along the side of the gymnasium, a soft cross that Carli Lloyd could finish with a flourish. "What's been your favorite moment of your career?" Lloyd was asked during a visit to Hillside Elementary School in Mount Laurel last month as part of the U.S. women's national soccer team's "She Believes" initiative. There was an obvious answer: China in 2008. There was a more telling answer: England in 2012. Lloyd's choice was to focus on the crisis of her career, a shocking seat on the bench before the 2012 Olympics - and her defiant and triumphant reaction to it - rather than her first great international success.
SPORTS
May 3, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Nelson Agholor has high and rather unusual expectations for his rookie season with the Eagles. They do not include any bold predictions about what kind of numbers the wide receiver expects to put up. For him, it's all about the learning and the labor. The rest, he figures, will take care of itself. "The number one thing I want to do is be in the right position," the first-round draft pick from Southern California said Friday after arriving at the NovaCare Complex. "I want to study the playbook.
SPORTS
April 18, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joel Embiid arguably could be one of the most gifted athletes to don a 76ers uniform. He's a 7-footer who dunks with ease off between-the-legs moves. He's a once-in-a-generation athlete for his size. He has the natural talent to develop into one of the NBA's best players. But he'll need a good work ethic combined with an ability to stay healthy to turn that potential into results on the court. "There were times that I wasn't happy," coach Brett Brown said Thursday of Embiid's lack of diligence.
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