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Work Ethic

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SPORTS
September 30, 1995 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Skepticism trails relentlessly behind 7-6 Shawn Bradley, casting a shadow over whatever he does. It goes where he goes. It colors whatever he does. It will not go away any time soon. Bradley knows the drill. He is just back from nine days in Hollywood, part of the cast of a motion picture titled "Space Jam. " The characters range from Michael Jordan to Charles Barkley to Muggsy Bogues to Bugs Bunny. But all anyone in Philadelphia wanted to know was, why wasn't Bradley in the practice gym with the Sixers, working at his craft?
SPORTS
March 20, 2013 | By Nick Carroll, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is an electrical box in Franklinville that looks different from most in the area. It is dented and marked up and has the signature of Josh Awotunde, who also used the blank canvas of the box to profess his NFL dreams. Awotunde is probably not going to the NFL. He did start at quarterback for Delsea, the Group 3 state champion, but his future is in another sport: track and field. Last season as a junior, Awotunde won the discus and finished fourth in the shot put at the state Group 3 championships.
SPORTS
September 25, 1989 | By Jay Searcy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Early in the fourth quarter, when the Eagles were beginning to run down, when they were holding timidly to a 21-17 lead and John Teltschik punted short from the shadow of his goal posts, it appeared that another football miracle was in the making at Veterans Stadium. The punt fell from the sky and bounced crazily into the back of unsuspecting San Francisco linebacker Bill Romanowski and into the hands of Henry "Gizmo" Williams of the Eagles. From there, the Eagles went on to score and take a 28-17 lead with just 8 minutes, 24 seconds remaining.
NEWS
July 22, 1987 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
From the mid-'70s through the early '80s, the critical word on Mark Harmon - who stars in the new Carl Reiner comedy, "Summer School," opening today at area theaters - was this: An ex-UCLA quarterback with bankable blue eyes, dazzling teeth and the acting talent of an ex-UCLA quarterback. For years, he scraped bottom in assembly-line Jack Webb TV productions and the horrendous nighttime soaper, "Flamingo Road. " Then, without warning, he emerged from Actor's Purgatory to deliver thoroughly believable performances as Dr. Bobby Caldwell, who undergoes a radical personality change, then suffers from AIDS on "St. Elsewhere"; astronaut Sam Crawford, who wins and then loses Maddie Hayes on "Moonlighting," and sex murderer Ted Bundy in the NBC mini-series, "The Deliberate Stranger.
SPORTS
October 18, 1994 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
John Chaney likes to say Aaron McKie has teeth in his stomach. "Moxie, toughness, inner strength," said Chaney, the Temple basketball coach who didn't know whether to laugh or cry when McKie completed his career last season, going to Portland as the No. 17 pick in the NBA draft. "I don't think you can say he has super-duper skills, but there's a great player inside him. A winner. " If that's the label attached to McKie, a 6-4 shooting guard, he's grateful. It beats being remembered as a Proposition 48, a kid from Simon Gratz High who couldn't crack 700 in the Scholastic Achievement Test, which cost him a season of eligibility with the Owls.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
The music on Kurt Vile's new album, Wakin on a Pretty Daze , is deeply relaxed and absolutely confident in its laid-back, stretched-out, fingerpicked trance vibe. So much so that it would be perfectly reasonable to assume that the Philadelphia rocker is a prototypical stoner dude. Reasonable perhaps, but incorrect. Sure, Kurt Vile - yes, that's his real name - looks the part. He's the guy with the past-his-shoulders hair to rival The Addams Family 's Cousin Itt, and who sat down to talk on a recent morning at the Rocket Cat Café in Kensington, up the street from the four-story-tall mural that provides the cover image for Wakin (Matador ***1/2)
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | By Joshua Klein, Special to The Inquirer
Just after Northern Burlington coach Joe Janney enjoyed his first winning season as girls' basketball coach, he's back in the rebuilding process. Four starters graduated and the remainder of his bench players are gone. He does have a couple of players back who saw some varsity playing time last year, but hardly enough to gain much experience or a letter. Many of the younger players are getting their first opportunity to play organized basketball because there is no junior high program.
SPORTS
December 7, 1992 | By Brian Freeman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At old Media High School, Penncrest coach Doug Randolph could have been considered a legend. He was a three-sport star there before moving on to Delaware State, where he again lettered in football, basketball and baseball. He was drafted by the Houston Oilers in football and by the Cincinnati Reds in baseball. Randolph even made it to double-A baseball in the Reds' chain as a shortstop. So when it comes to winning, Randolph knows a little something about the subject. As Randolph gets ready to start his second season as the Lions' coach, he hopes some of his work ethic and knowledge will rub off on his players.
SPORTS
June 15, 2003 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In the baseball world, Chris Lubanski has been turning heads for a long time. Luke McNichol recalled when Lubanski, a star outfielder from Kennedy-Kenrick High School in Norristown, attended an instructional camp at West Chester University nearly a decade ago. "They called him 'The Human Line Drive,' " said McNichol, the head coach at West Chester Henderson. "You threw the ball in to him and he lined it right back out at you. " It was that way most of this season. The 6-foot-3, 190-pound senior, who last week was selected fifth overall by the Kansas City Royals in major-league baseball's amateur draft, hit .528 (38 for 72)
SPORTS
June 19, 2011 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Timber Creek football coach Rob Hinson thinks people have the wrong idea about Damiere Byrd. "There's a big misconception out there," Hinson said. "People think he's this guy who has been naturally blessed with all this speed, and they think that's where his success comes from. They don't realize how hard this kid works. " Timber Creek track coach Chris Grottini says the same thing about Byrd, in different words: "He doesn't take his talent for granted. He's the last one to leave the track at practice.
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SPORTS
October 31, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
IN THE FALL OF 2008, Chris Maragos and J.J. Watt were walk-ons at the University of Wisconsin, Watt having transferred back to his home state after not getting much playing time as a freshman tight end at Central Michigan, Maragos having left Western Michigan in search of a bigger stage. Watt - shifted to defense and still growing into his 6-5, 289-pound frame - sat out the season under NCAA transfer rules, but a few practices taught Maragos a lot about the man who remains his friend and offseason workout companion.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN YOU'RE one of 13 children, who needs friends? Robert Collins had a built-in playground with all those siblings. Maybe there was a problem when more than one had to use the bathroom, but basically all the brothers and sisters got along and enjoyed one another as playmates. Robert was the 10th of the 13 children of Jeannette Collins and Henry Stokes, and grew up in West Philadelphia. A man of many talents and interests, Robert was employed for 25 years by the international real-estate company Tishman Speyer, working in engineering on the Bala Plaza complex in Bala Cynwyd.
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | Daily News staff and wire reports
JADEVEON CLOWNEY said yesterday he believes that he's the NFL's No. 1 draft pick and that he took a big step toward that goal during South Carolina's pro day workouts yesterday. The 6-5, 266-pound defensive end did position drills in front of dozens of NFL personnel, including Houston coach Bill O'Brien and Jacksonville's Gus Bradley. And Clowney thinks he elevated his already-elite status during the 40 minutes or so of running through cones, jumping over hurdles and catching tennis balls in workouts he passed on at the NFL combine in February.
SPORTS
March 24, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matt Klinewski is tall and strong, with good skills for a basketball big man. He can shoot with either hand close to the rim. He can knock down mid-range jumpers. He can hit his free throws. But people hardly mention that stuff when they talk about the Eastern senior. They focus on his work ethic. His effort. His passion. "In all my years, he's the hardest-working kid I've ever been around," Eastern coach Joe Murphy said. "He came to the gym every single day and gave 100 percent.
SPORTS
February 28, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
THERE WAS A TIME when big-money contract extensions for 32-year-old players just weren't how the Eagles rolled. But times change, front offices change, exceptions arise. If Eagles general manager Howie Roseman had any reservations about guaranteeing Jason Peters $19.55 million in a 5-year, $51.3 million contract announced yesterday, Roseman did a very good job of hiding them. "He's got a chance to be a Hall-of-Fame-type player in an Eagles uniform. For us to get that kind of player, and have him end his career here, still playing at an extremely high level . . . just knowing that he continued to get better in this offense, in this scheme, with his work ethic and his determination, he's a guy that really can defy all the odds that you look at going forward," Roseman said after the deal was announced.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Bob Marshall learned the value of hard work at an early age. By age 12, he was working at part-time jobs to help his single mother raise her five children. "Near poverty level" is how he recalls the family circumstances. Through hard work, Marshall excelled in the classroom and on the playing field. In 1957, at 158 pounds, he was starting offensive guard for the Roxborough High School football team that won the Public League Championship. A year later, as a halfback, he scored 10 touchdowns in six games.
SPORTS
February 19, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Larry Bowa is one of the best fielding infielders in Phillies history. With a tireless work ethic, Bowa made himself into a five-time All-Star, a two-time Gold Glove winner and a shortstop who led the National League in fielding percentage in six seasons. Bowa was stationed at shortstop late yesterday afternoon on the infield practice field at the Carpenter Complex. But instead of a glove, the former manager and current bench coach and infield drill sergeant was wielding a fungo bat. Bowa blasted short hops - and other ground balls that simulated low throws - at first base, where Ryan Howard and Darin Ruf were on the receiving end. Howard was getting the brunt of the work, with four or five repetitions to every one or two for Ruf. "I thought he was looking good," Bowa said afterward of Howard, who has been criticized for his fielding.
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
CEDRIC THORNTON doesn't look like a guy you'd peg as a run-stopper of a defensive lineman. At 6-3, 309, he's kind of rangy. If you didn't know his listed weight and someone told you he was a linebacker, you wouldn't look askance. But Thornton, an undrafted second-year man from Southern Arkansas, has a 14.9 "run-stop percentage," according to the Pro Football Focus website, and that happens to be the highest in the NFL, by PFF's reckoning. No. 2 is that J.J. Watt dude, down in Houston.
SPORTS
August 9, 2013 | BY JOHN MURROW, Daily News Staff Writer murrowj@phillynews.com
AFTER A 2-hour practice under the hot sun yesterday, defensive tackle Cedric Thornton was one of the last Eagles to walk off the field. It was nearly 25 minutes after his teammates did so shortly after noon. Thornton spent that time talking and working on multiple drills with assistant defensive line coach Erik Chinander. The one-on-one drills allowed Thornton to focus primarily on his pass-rushing skills, a skill set he would like to improve upon with the team's transition to the 3-4 defense.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
The music on Kurt Vile's new album, Wakin on a Pretty Daze , is deeply relaxed and absolutely confident in its laid-back, stretched-out, fingerpicked trance vibe. So much so that it would be perfectly reasonable to assume that the Philadelphia rocker is a prototypical stoner dude. Reasonable perhaps, but incorrect. Sure, Kurt Vile - yes, that's his real name - looks the part. He's the guy with the past-his-shoulders hair to rival The Addams Family 's Cousin Itt, and who sat down to talk on a recent morning at the Rocket Cat Café in Kensington, up the street from the four-story-tall mural that provides the cover image for Wakin (Matador ***1/2)
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