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Work Experience

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NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
At Pride Paws, homemade dog biscuits are hot items. "Sometimes we sell them as fast as we can bake them," says manager Renee McCormac. The biscuits helped launch the nonprofit Medford retailer, which offers developmentally disabled young adults a place to work and prepare for "the next, better job," says founder Joe Ritzel. He and his wife, Linda, of Marlton, are part of a close-knit group of Special Olympics parents who established Pride Ventures Inc. Joe is its board president and Linda is a trustee.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | By Lisa Kozleski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Not many people can claim they have a lot in common with Miss America. But 19-year-old Shannon Hoopes of Camden can. Both Hoopes and Shawntel Smith, the reigning Miss America, are ardent supporters of school-to-work, a recently established national program aimed at helping students better prepare for the working world before they leave high school. Smith picked the school-to-work program for her platform last September at the Atlantic City competition, supporting a well-established program in her home state of Oklahoma.
NEWS
August 13, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by Elizabeth Malby
The Philadelphia Housing Authority marked the end of its Phila-Job summer program with a picnic and awards ceremony yesterday in Fairmount Park. About 300 residents, ages 15 to 21, got work experience in jobs at PHA offices. And 100 residents, ages 14 and 15, took part in job-readiness classes.
NEWS
March 27, 2005 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Three teenagers, armed with maroon linen napkins, polished silverware recently for the dinner crowd at a Warminster retirement community. They interrupted their work to talk hair. "How do they do the highlights?" asked Kirstin Snyder, 16. "They put your hair up," answered Meghan McNickle, 17. "It stings your eyes. " The students, juniors in the life skills class at William Tennent High School in Warminster, turned back to the task at hand and continued to work in comfortable silence.
NEWS
March 24, 2008
IN HER letter, Peggy Banaszek complains that her work experience was misrepresented when she was identified as an "insurance industry representative" in a recent voter ID call. Yet in a candidate questionnaire and on her Web site, she touts her "years of experience as a successful Project Manager in the Medicare and health insurance industries" as a primary qualification for her candidacy. And the call was a common voter ID call - not a poll of any sort - that simply asked voters which candidate they intend to vote for. It's typical to cite a candidate's profession in such a call - campaigns use them to help identify supportive voters for turnout efforts.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | By Noel E. Holton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Glassboro High School freshman Antoni Simmons likes computers. He is also a decent math student. With the help of a state-funded mentoring program targeting ninth-grade students, Simmons, 16, has been able to explore his natural abilities and interests while earning a little cash. Since January, the soft-spoken teenager has been working at Commerce Bank in Glassboro as part of the At-Risk Youth Employment Internship Program. The two-year-old pilot program, which partners local businesses with students, was designed to give high school freshmen some real work experience.
NEWS
September 17, 1995 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Enrique Orduna is a junior at Drexel University who will take no tests and write no papers this semester. Instead, he will get up each day and go to work at AMP Inc., an engineering firm in Elizabethtown, Pa. Orduna is one of 2,200 students in Drexel's cooperative-education program (co-op, for short) who take at least two semesters off to gain on-the-job experience. Like hundreds of thousands of college students in co-ops across the country, Orduna is coming to grips with a painful lesson: If you want to increase your chances of getting a good job when you get out of college, you need solid work experience when you're in college.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | By Noel E. Holton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Glassboro High School freshman Antoni Simmons likes computers. He is also a decent math student. With the help of a state-funded mentoring program targeting ninth-grade students, Simmons, 16, has been able to explore his natural abilities and interests while earning a little cash. Since January, the soft-spoken teenager has been working at Commerce Bank in Glassboro as part of the At-Risk Youth Employment Internship Program. The two-year-old pilot program, which partners local businesses with students, was designed to give high school freshmen some real work experience.
NEWS
June 19, 1996 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a hall decorated with handmade posters and tables filled with homemade refreshments, couples were encouraged to step to the sounds of D.J. Bob McCone at the second annual June Bug Dance. The party, held at Swarthmore College's Sharpless Hall Friday evening, was not for collegians, but for students and graduates of the Delaware County Intermediate Unit's Work Experience Program. For these 120 or so young people with disabilities, the dance was a socialization lesson taught on the ballroom floor, according to Catherine Bosna-Passe, program job developer.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
By Paul E. Harrington and Nancy L. Snyder As the school year ends, teens will be flocking to apply for summer jobs at local stores and restaurants. Most of them will be turned away. Overlooked in many discussions about the Great Recession is the plummeting number of employed teens. In Philadelphia, just 20 percent of all teenagers were employed last year. A recent study we conducted at Drexel University's Center for Labor Markets and Policy and Boston's Commonwealth Corp.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Murray had left Rowan University without a degree and gone back once before. When she left a second time, the lack of a bachelor's degree, just a few classes away, nagged at her. "I had four courses left, and I thought, 'There's no way I could let this go,' " Murray said Thursday. "It was always, 'What am I going to do?' . . . It always played on my mind. " Several years later, she got a letter from Rowan announcing a pilot program for those who had left the university with credits but no degree.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
By Paul E. Harrington and Nancy L. Snyder As the school year ends, teens will be flocking to apply for summer jobs at local stores and restaurants. Most of them will be turned away. Overlooked in many discussions about the Great Recession is the plummeting number of employed teens. In Philadelphia, just 20 percent of all teenagers were employed last year. A recent study we conducted at Drexel University's Center for Labor Markets and Policy and Boston's Commonwealth Corp.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
At Pride Paws, homemade dog biscuits are hot items. "Sometimes we sell them as fast as we can bake them," says manager Renee McCormac. The biscuits helped launch the nonprofit Medford retailer, which offers developmentally disabled young adults a place to work and prepare for "the next, better job," says founder Joe Ritzel. He and his wife, Linda, of Marlton, are part of a close-knit group of Special Olympics parents who established Pride Ventures Inc. Joe is its board president and Linda is a trustee.
NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Darrell Smith, McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS (MCT)
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - The children had read their stories, finished their drawings and were getting antsy, squirming in their seats inside the small community center and waiting for the words they longed to hear. "OK, guys," Alexis Rodriguez called out to the class. "Time for recess. " It's Rodriguez's second week at her first job. The 17-year-old is a recreational aide and tutor for local nonprofit agency Mercy Housing at its Kennedy Estates complex in Sacramento. Alexis' summer job is a paid internship through a program run by Sacramento community services group Asian Resources Inc. The summer intern program is one local effort helping teens enter the work world and cut into a teen jobless rate that in California stands at more than 34 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
NEWS
October 19, 2009
IT'S SO AMAZING how the first paragraph of your article states that "Philadelphia has a lot to feel good about, according to a Center City District report. " How can a report based on questionnaires sent to those living between Girard Avenue and Tasker Street, and the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers possibly speak for the entire city of Philadelphia? Of course, people living in those areas are feeling good. They never had anything to worry about in the first place. They are all happy yuppie-types and well-to-do rich folks.
NEWS
December 1, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kelly Pitcher knows how lucky she was to land a prized internship at SAP America Inc. in Newtown Square last fall. After this semester, the business-software giant is putting its internship program on hold, eliminating paid, on-the-job training for as many as 100 students a year. "I'm glad I got in before things got bad," said Pitcher, 20, a junior accounting major at Widener University who worked in the accounts-payable department. "But I'm a little worried because I want to do another co-op.
NEWS
March 24, 2008
IN HER letter, Peggy Banaszek complains that her work experience was misrepresented when she was identified as an "insurance industry representative" in a recent voter ID call. Yet in a candidate questionnaire and on her Web site, she touts her "years of experience as a successful Project Manager in the Medicare and health insurance industries" as a primary qualification for her candidacy. And the call was a common voter ID call - not a poll of any sort - that simply asked voters which candidate they intend to vote for. It's typical to cite a candidate's profession in such a call - campaigns use them to help identify supportive voters for turnout efforts.
NEWS
March 27, 2005 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Three teenagers, armed with maroon linen napkins, polished silverware recently for the dinner crowd at a Warminster retirement community. They interrupted their work to talk hair. "How do they do the highlights?" asked Kirstin Snyder, 16. "They put your hair up," answered Meghan McNickle, 17. "It stings your eyes. " The students, juniors in the life skills class at William Tennent High School in Warminster, turned back to the task at hand and continued to work in comfortable silence.
NEWS
October 25, 2004 | By Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Schmid and Leslie McGeoch were in grade school when Bill Clinton was elected president. They each graduated from high school in 1999 and have little work experience. Both still live with their parents in Gloucester County. At 23, Schmid and McGeoch are in a demographic commonly known for not voting. But Schmid and McGeoch do plan to hit the polls on Nov. 2. In fact, they intend to pull levers for themselves. Schmid, a Democrat, is running for council in Woodbury. McGeoch is on the Republican ticket for Harrison Township Committee.
NEWS
March 16, 2003 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Linda Strieter has been a fashion merchandiser and a wedding planner, a disc jockey and a summer worker on the Wildwood, N.J., boardwalk. Now, all that experience is helping her do her new job: 4-H Club youth-program coordinator for Gloucester County. After graduating from Syracuse University with a home-economics degree in 1973, Strieter headed to New York, where she was an assistant buyer for B. Altman. She followed that up with a variety of jobs, including manager for Kids R Us and Toys R Us, before taking over the Rutgers Cooperative Extension's food-and-nutrition education program in Camden.
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