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NEWS
January 27, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Laura Rogers-Fisher lived the high life. There were trips to the Bahamas, Las Vegas, and Mexico; expensive cars; World Series tickets; a suite at the Army-Navy game; home remodeling projects; and tuition paid to the Haverford School and Brown University for her son. Her activities were documented in photos and in the gifts she spread around the office of Sho Aids, a small business in Sharon Hill. On Friday, Rogers-Fisher pleaded guilty to theft, conspiracy, and forgery, and was sentenced to two to four years in state prison and five years' probation, and ordered to pay restitution for embezzling more than $660,000 from the company where she worked for 10 years and whose coworkers once considered her a "sister.
NEWS
December 9, 1986 | By William W. Sutton Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a public commitment to maintain services, the Goode administration has refused to hire 33 maintenance workers who the city's own recreation officials believe are necessary to prevent deterioration at playgrounds and other facilities, some of them newly renovated. An internal memorandum from Deputy Recreation Commissioner George V. Karalius in June outlined his plan to hire 33 more workers for an "expanded maintenance staff" of carpenters, plumbers, painters and other helpers at a cost of $601,827.
NEWS
March 12, 1987 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer (Inquirer staff writer Dan Meyers contributed to this article.)
Arguing that "safety shouldn't be a reaction to a body count," Transport Workers Union president Roger Tauss yesterday led a group of labor leaders in calling for an independent investigation of SEPTA's management and safety practices. The union officials' call came within hours of a state House vote unanimously approving an investigation of SEPTA's management, service and safety. The sponsor of the resolution, Rep. Gordon J. Linton (D., Phila.), said he hoped the House Transportation Committee would begin hearings next week.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | By Jeff Eckhoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Better late than never. That's the response from officials at the Chester County Housing Authority to a federal review they received last month suggesting an overhaul of the way the Housing Authority runs its maintenance operations. According to the report, a "maintenance review" completed by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Housing Authority needs to revamp the way it assigns maintenance personnel and better train the people who remain on-site throughout the county.
NEWS
August 16, 2000 | by Carl R. Greene
The Philadelphia Housing Authority is aware that its public perception has not always been positive. But it is important for the people of Philadelphia to know that we are taking action to shatter that perception every day. After two years of hard work, we are seeing higher-quality housing and more efficient management than ever before. Our innovative and fast-paced initiatives to improve public housing are receiving praise from public housing residents and our neighbors throughout the community.
NEWS
June 22, 1998 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
When community groups gather to talk about neighborhood revitalization and redevelopment, the new director of the troubled Philadelphia Housing Authority wants a seat at the table. It's a seat that has long been empty. At best, PHA has been a passive player in community redevelopment. At worst, PHA properties have been a deterrent to investment. That's about to change, said Carl Green, who took over as PHA director three months ago. "It's pretty difficult for any organization . . . to consider neighborhood redevelopment in Philadelphia without considering the impact of PHA, because we have the scattered sites, and we have them in every neighborhood - and we've got Section 8, and they're in every neighborhood," Green said.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Council members spent three hours yesterday grilling officials from the Recreation Department about everything from who cleans the bathrooms at recreation centers to whether the much-maligned Veterans Stadium really is, as Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie recently charged, "rat-infested. " The questioning was part of a monthlong series of City Council hearings in which every city department is presenting its accomplishments, goals and financial demands for the future. During the long hearing, Council members focused on how the Recreation Department would spend its proposed $38 million share of city taxpayer money, a figure that represents a $1.5 million increase from the current budget.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's aging parks and recreation facilities are going to get a lot more attention starting this spring. Thanks to a $2.6 million increase in the department's budget, Parks and Recreation Commissioner Michael DiBerardinis plans to hire 63 full-time people, most of them in skilled trades and maintenance. It's the first such expansion in as long as any one in the department - which receives less funding than parks do in most big cities - can remember. "Parks have never gotten anything close to this in recent history," DiBerardinis said.
NEWS
January 26, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Laura Rogers-Fisher lived the high life. There were trips to the Bahamas, Las Vegas and Mexico; expensive cars; World Series tickets; a suite at the Army-Navy game; home remodeling projects, and tuition paid to The Haverford School and Brown University for her son. Her activities were documented in photos and in the gifts she spread around the office of Sho Aids, a small business in Sharon Hill. On Friday, Rogers-Fisher pleaded guilty to theft, conspiracy, and forgery and was sentenced to two to four years in state prison, five years' probation, and ordered to pay restitution for embezzling more than $660,000 from the company where she worked for 10 years and whose co-workers once considered her a "sister.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Steve Thomas spurns titles such as president or chief executive officer. Instead, he prefers references such as owner or general contractor. He says he's lucky. "I was at the right place at the right time, that sort of thing," Thomas said. Lucky or not, Thomas, the owner of S.J. Thomas Co. Inc. in Lansdowne, has landed a lucrative federal contract - valued at $3.9 million - by outbidding another contractor. Under the contract, with the U.S. General Services Administration, Thomas will repair government-owned and government-leased buildings in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia Counties in Pennsylvania; Mercer and Camden Counties in New Jersey, and New Castle County in Delaware.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
June 23, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a dog came into Monica L'Tainen's life, the two of them agreed: It was time to move. She had been pining for her own patch of green, and after rescuing her pup, Bodhi, Center City loft living just wasn't providing enough country-style respite for either of them. One night, as she was sitting with friends in Chestnut Hill, having drinks around a fire pit, L'Tainen said, she had an epiphany and observed, " 'Everyone is happy here.' Someone in the group replied, 'Yes, because we all live out here!
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's aging parks and recreation facilities are going to get a lot more attention starting this spring. Thanks to a $2.6 million increase in the department's budget, Parks and Recreation Commissioner Michael DiBerardinis plans to hire 63 full-time people, most of them in skilled trades and maintenance. It's the first such expansion in as long as any one in the department - which receives less funding than parks do in most big cities - can remember. "Parks have never gotten anything close to this in recent history," DiBerardinis said.
NEWS
January 27, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Laura Rogers-Fisher lived the high life. There were trips to the Bahamas, Las Vegas, and Mexico; expensive cars; World Series tickets; a suite at the Army-Navy game; home remodeling projects; and tuition paid to the Haverford School and Brown University for her son. Her activities were documented in photos and in the gifts she spread around the office of Sho Aids, a small business in Sharon Hill. On Friday, Rogers-Fisher pleaded guilty to theft, conspiracy, and forgery, and was sentenced to two to four years in state prison and five years' probation, and ordered to pay restitution for embezzling more than $660,000 from the company where she worked for 10 years and whose coworkers once considered her a "sister.
NEWS
January 26, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Laura Rogers-Fisher lived the high life. There were trips to the Bahamas, Las Vegas and Mexico; expensive cars; World Series tickets; a suite at the Army-Navy game; home remodeling projects, and tuition paid to The Haverford School and Brown University for her son. Her activities were documented in photos and in the gifts she spread around the office of Sho Aids, a small business in Sharon Hill. On Friday, Rogers-Fisher pleaded guilty to theft, conspiracy, and forgery and was sentenced to two to four years in state prison, five years' probation, and ordered to pay restitution for embezzling more than $660,000 from the company where she worked for 10 years and whose co-workers once considered her a "sister.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | By Valerie Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
Construction workers are expected to be back on the job at the Goldtex Building near Center City Monday, after the city lifted a "stop-work" order it placed at the site more than a week ago. Developers Matthew and Michael Pestronk met with the city's Department of Licenses and Inspections for nearly three hours Friday, Mike Pestronk said. The stop-work order was lifted after the brothers presented the contracts, business-privilege licenses, contractors' licenses and certificates of insurance for every subcontractor on the job at the abandoned textile factory building, at 12th and Wood streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2011
DEAR ABBY: Our daughter, "Julie," came home for the weekend so we could meet her new boyfriend, "Scott. " He's a delightful young man, and my daughter is clearly smitten. When I suggested Scott sleep in the guest room, Julie and my wife gave me this perplexed look as though I'm from a different planet. In the end, I was deeply disappointed that they shared a bedroom. After 30 years of marriage, this created the first disagreement between my wife and me in a long time. I'm no prude.
NEWS
July 5, 2005 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In some ways, they seem to come from another era - sisters still garbed in distinctive, dark, heavy cotton habits with rope belts tied into three knots and long rosaries that swing when they walk. But you won't find them in some sort of Sound of Music setting. These nuns live on a pastoral patch of land in the middle of built-up Cherry Hill. Few realize that the tiny but growing order, the Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Infant Jesus, exists at all - let alone that the delegation house, or national center, sits back from busy Kresson Road, where the order is about to put the finishing touches on the most ambitious project in its history.
NEWS
March 13, 2004 | By Keith Herbert INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has dismissed a $50 million civil-rights lawsuit filed by a West Conshohocken man who claimed last year that borough officials and his neighbors had conspired to thwart his plans to build an addition to his house. U.S. District Judge Edmund V. Ludwig ruled Tuesday that Joseph "Jay" Soppick waited too long to claim that borough officials had retaliated against him by yanking his building permit. Soppick had two years from April 23, 1999, when a stop-work order was issued by the borough, to file his claim, the ruling states.
NEWS
December 5, 2001 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time since 1978, a New Jersey judge has jailed striking public schoolteachers for refusing to return to work. Choosing names alphabetically from a list, Superior Court Judge Clarkson S. Fisher Jr. yesterday ordered 43 members of the Middletown Township Education Association to report to jail for contempt of court. He jailed four other members on Monday. Fisher has threatened to jail all the striking teachers and secretaries from the 1,000-member union unless they return to work at the 17 schools in the district, the largest in Monmouth County.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2001 | By Melanie D. Scott INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Basic Commerce and Industries Inc. has won a $31 million Navy contract to provide technical support and engineering during the construction, maintenance and service of combat-support systems on cruisers, destroyers and missile frigates. The company, based in Moorestown, Burlington County, was awarded the contract last week. It was the second five-year contract the company has won for this work, Adam Miklovis, its marketing director, said. The company helps ensure that a ship is in top working order before it is used for combat.
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