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Work Release

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LIVING
March 8, 1993 | This story includes information from the Los Angeles Times, the New York Daily News, the Chicago Tribune, the Associated Press and the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel
Given the man's history, it should come as no surprise that the Rev. Al Sharpton was in jail for less than a day before a new controversy erupted around him. Sharpton was sentenced to 45 days for his participation in the 1987 "Day of Outrage," a demonstration called to protest the killing of a black man by a white gang in the Howard Beach section of Queens, N.Y., that caused massive disruption to car and subway traffic. On Friday Sharpton arrived at Rikers Island; on Saturday he was moved to the Brooklyn House of Detention, because, said his attorney C. Vernon Mason, his arrival at Rikers caused such a jubilant reaction among the inmates.
NEWS
October 23, 1999 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
Starting next week, convicted hit-and-run mom Karen Howard will get out of jail - and go directly to work. Howard, 35, serving a 360-day sentence for leaving the scene of the October 1998 car accident that fatally wounded Robert Hoagland on the shoulder of Interstate 76 in Gloucester City, N.J., yesterday was approved for the work-release program. That means the slender brunette, wife of Eagles executive Ron Howard, will leave jail each morning to work as a health-insurance-benefits clerk and return to her county jail cell in the evening.
NEWS
April 11, 1992 | By Sergio R. Bustos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Chester County prosecutor yesterday formally requested that Common Pleas Judge Leonard Sugerman reconsider his April 2 decision to place Christina Frey in a work-release program that allows her to leave prison each afternoon to care for her children. First Assistant District Attorney Joseph W. Carroll 3d asked that another hearing be held to review the case of Frey, 41, of Lancaster, former director of the Coatesville water and sewer authority. Frey was sentenced to 23 to 59 months following her no-contest plea last June to 11 counts of theft and 13 counts of commercial bribery for embezzling public money and accepting kickbacks while she ran the water authority.
NEWS
April 3, 1992 | By Sergio R. Bustos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Christina K. Frey, the former executive director of the Coatesville water authority convicted last summer in Chester County's biggest bribery scandal, will no longer spend her nights behind bars. After nine months in prison, Frey, 41, will now be allowed to go home every night as part of a work release program ordered by Chester County Court Judge Leonard Sugerman. Sugerman is permitting Frey to leave prison at 3 p.m. each day to take care of her two young children and then return to prison by 8 a.m. the following day. Frey is serving a sentence of 23 to 59 months, imposed after she pleaded no contest in June to 11 counts of theft and 13 counts of commercial bribery for embezzling public money and accepting kickbacks.
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | By Timothy Cornell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Chester County judge has set limits on the freedom of Christina Frey, who was imprisoned for taking bribes and kickbacks from contractors for the Coatesville Water Authority, where she was director. Last July, Chester County Common Pleas Judge Leonard Sugerman imposed a 23- to-59-month prison sentence on Frey, who was convicted of 24 counts of theft and commercial bribery in the case. But in April, at Frey's request, Sugerman authorized a work-release program that allowed Frey to spend weeknights at her home in Lancaster, caring for her two sons.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | By David T. Shaw, Special to The Inquirer
Thomas G. Frame sat behind a large oak desk in his office at Chester County Prison, marveling at his smooth tenure as warden. In his 19 years as head of the sprawling minimum-security prison, Frame has never had a disturbance that required the assistance of outside agencies. He can count on one hand the number of attempted escapes. Testaments to his success - various service awards - adorn the walls of his office. But Frame is worried. His concern does not arise from problems with inmates, despite overcrowding that has at times pushed the population of the 280-cell prison in Pocopson Township to more than 600. His concern, instead, is with the people of Pocopson.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | By Suzanne Sczubelek, Special to The Inquirer
A $2 million corrections project that has been a nightmare for county officials and a dream for female offenders will begin materializing in the new year. A 100-bed work release center will be designed by January for the grounds of Chester County Prison in Pocopson. The county commissioners recently signed a $99,750 contract with Crabtree, Rohrbaugh & Associates, a Harrisburg architectural firm. The signing is the most decisive step in the project, which has dragged on for three years.
SPORTS
December 9, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Former Super Bowl star Plaxico Burress wants to get a break from prison, but prosecutors said yesterday they will likely try to block his bid for work release because he hasn't served enough time. The former New York Giant applied for a work furlough - which would let him spend some portion of his time at home - on Nov. 25, about 2 months into his 2-year sentence for carrying an unlicensed gun that went off and wounded him at a Manhattan nightclub. State prison system officials are expected to decide on his request next month.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press, United Press International and USA Today contributed to this report
James Brown was released yesterday to a work-release program after serving 15 months of a six-year term in a South Carolina prison for aggravated assault. The soul singer was transferred from the State Park Correctional Center in Aiken to the minimum-security Lower Savannah Work Center nearby. He's scheduled to begin work Monday for the Aiken Community Action Commission, where he is expected to counsel youths on drugs, poverty and homelessness. Brown, 56, must return to the center each night and on weekends.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
Doylestown Township officials reviewed plans Tuesday for a Bucks County work-release correctional facility and, at the same meeting, reversed their stand on a controversial subdivision plan for the Hagan tract near the Pine Run Reservoir. The proposed Bucks County Rehabilitation Center, northwest of Almshouse Road, would replace a minimum-security facility near the site. That center was built in 1964 for the first work-release program in Pennsylvania and houses 230 inmates, according to Art Wallenstein, Bucks County director of corrections.
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NEWS
January 27, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
HARRY GAINES, the West Philadelphia man arrested last January for slashing the tires of 56 parked cars in the neighborhood, was sentenced to 11 1/2 to 23 months in jail yesterday. The sentence, handed down by Common Pleas Judge Rayford Means, will allow Gaines to be released during the day to work and return to jail at night. Work release, the judge said, will give Gaines, 28, the ability to find a job to pay restitution - estimated at $5,000 - to his victims. Means also sentenced Gaines to serve 30 years of probation and ordered him to cooperate with the District Attorney's Office in the prosecution of his codefendant and stepsister, Aleze Lewis, 37. Her trial is scheduled for March.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Senate Judiciary Committee is set to hold a public hearing this morning in Montgomeryville on a House bill that would increase penalties for illegal possession of a firearm. The hearing is being hosted by State Sen. Stewart Greenleaf (R., Montgomery/Bucks) longtime chairman of the Judiciary Committee. Its purpose is to elicit comment from area citizens and law enforcement officials on the legislation. Scheduled speakers include the bill's sponsor State Rep. Todd Stephens, Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey, Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, Montgomery County First Assistant District Attorney Kevin R. Steele, and Mark H. Bergstrom, executive director of the Pennsylvania Commission of Sentencing.
NEWS
October 26, 2011
EASTON, Pa. - An expired car registration has landed a man back in prison after 25 years on the lam, police said. Alfred Libiano, 64, of Easton, who walked away from work release at the Northampton County Prison on May 9, 1986, was arrested by Pennsylvania State Police during a traffic stop in Monroe County. - AP  
NEWS
May 16, 2011 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com
Patrick Groce, a family man with plenty of community ties, was a 19-year-old thug in June 1994 when he and a buddy pulled their car to the curb, verbally taunted a gay man and beat the stranger to the ground near 13th and Lombard streets. "Are you gay? Are you gay? Are you a faggot?" Groce and Thomas Grafton yelled at Allan Yollin, 30, before unleashing the attack, which left the victim with bruised ribs and facial scratches. Police chased and caught the pair, who were convicted of aggravated assault, criminal conspiracy and simple assault.
NEWS
January 26, 2011 | By Kathleen Brady Shea, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Pottstown man who stole more than $127,000 from his former employer, the Honey Brook Fire Company's ambulance division, will spend 111/2 to 23 months in jail, followed by five years' probation. Chester County Court Judge Ronald Nagle imposed the sentence Tuesday on Christopher A. Yocom, 35. The judge made Yocom eligible for work release, explaining that he did so only because Yocom had repaid $65,000 of the stolen money. The judge said the theft, which involved diverting ambulance checks to a personal account from February 2007 until February 2009, represented "a significant, significant, amount of money.
NEWS
September 13, 2010 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lancaster County prison officials use an iris scanner to identify inmates so there is no mistaking who walks out the door. In Bucks County, a supervisor triple-checks paperwork to avoid errors; Montgomery County requires at least two corrections officers to discharge a prisoner. In Chester County, inmates wear photo identification cards. Even with those measures, wardens say mistaken releases happen, though rarely - no more than one a year from each county jail. Prison officials in Philadelphia and its Pennsylvania suburbs say they have not had the kinds of problems with mistaken releases that Delaware County has had; at least five inmates have been released in error there since May. Montgomery County has had only one mistaken release in the last 15 years; Chester County has had one in the last two years; and Bucks and Philadelphia officials say about once a year prisoners in those counties are let out of jail too early.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
ALL THAT stuff we told you yesterday about Charlie Sheen 's plea bargain . . . Never mind. According to TMZ.com, the deal fell apart because Jail Administrative Officer Beverly Campbell refused to give Charlie work release. She felt he was only eligible for "Useful Public Service" (or UPS, or "What can a brown jumpsuit do for you?"), which would not allow him to smoke or eat outside the jail, and his hours of freedom would be more limited. Sheriff Bob Braudis allegedly agreed to the work release but has since decided to back Beverly.
SPORTS
December 9, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Former Super Bowl star Plaxico Burress wants to get a break from prison, but prosecutors said yesterday they will likely try to block his bid for work release because he hasn't served enough time. The former New York Giant applied for a work furlough - which would let him spend some portion of his time at home - on Nov. 25, about 2 months into his 2-year sentence for carrying an unlicensed gun that went off and wounded him at a Manhattan nightclub. State prison system officials are expected to decide on his request next month.
NEWS
November 26, 2009 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
South Philadelphia mob associate Louis "Bent Finger Lou" Monacello, a prime target in a state police investigation dubbed Operation Delco Nostra, was sentenced yesterday to 11 1/2 to 23 months in prison. Delaware County Court Judge Frank T. Hazel imposed the sentence during a half-hour hearing in which Monacello, 43, pleaded guilty to two conspiracy charges tied to the case. Monacello was ordered to surrender to county prison officials Jan. 5. Whether he spends any time behind bars, however, is uncertain.
NEWS
April 24, 2009 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A college student from Chester County was sentenced yesterday to six to 23 months in prison for severely beating an employee of Geno's Steaks in South Philadelphia. Common Pleas Court Judge Thomas Dempsey sentenced Kevin Bacci, 20, to prison but allowed him to serve the term on work release, meaning that Bacci will have to return to prison every evening on work days and stay in prison when he is not working. He must also serve four years of probation. "I do believe you are truly sorry for your actions that night; no matter, the damage remains," Dempsey told Bacci.
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