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Work Stoppage

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SPORTS
March 5, 2011
ATLANTIC CITY - Eagles coach Andy Reid was asked at the Maxwell Club dinner last night whether thoughts of the lockout seep into his mind. "I've got confidence that it will get done, so I just move forward," Reid said. "You know how I am. We've got a whole lot of things to do to get better as a football team, and that's where my focus is. " Reid was asked about the team's keeping Kevin Kolb: "We'll see," he said. "We would love to have Kevin back as our second quarterback.
NEWS
April 25, 2000 | By Richard Lezin Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a day of surprise and anger and another of prayer and tears, emotions ran no less raw among Cuban exiles here yesterday after Saturday's stunning blitz by federal authorities to seize 6-year-old Elian Gonzalez and turn him over to his father in Washington. And even as many Cuban Americans coping with the shock held a third day of demonstrations and prayer vigils, much of the rest of this largely Elian-weary city began to creep toward normalcy. The media encampment outside the Little Havana house that had been a magnet for protesters has been dismantled, and the gatherings that had led to nearly 300 arrests since Saturday were mostly peaceful yesterday.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly 100 white- and blue-collar union employees of Camden's Housing Authority staged a sit-in yesterday - and were expected to spend the night at their job sites - after two mediation and negotiation teams failed to reach contract agreements. Although contract talks did not break off, employees for Council 71 the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees stopped work at 2:15 p.m. to underscore their demand for salary raises and to support the union negotiator's request for round-the-clock talks, which they say has been denied by the Housing Authority.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2010 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Longshoremen on Wednesday announced an end to their work stoppage that idled ships for two days at the Port of New York and New Jersey and at Packer Avenue Marine Terminal in South Philadelphia. "It is anticipated that as soon as the pickets leave, normal operations will resume," the International Longshoremen's Association said in an afternoon statement. The situation that precipitated the stoppage "has not been resolved," but ILA members were to return to work at 7 p.m. Wednesday, the New York Shipping Association said.
NEWS
June 13, 2010 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University Hospital's nurses and allied health professionals are eligible for unemployment compensation for their 28-day work stoppage in April, the Pennsylvania Bureau of Unemployment Compensation said in a decision released late Friday. And the hospital will have to foot the bill. The workers are eligible, the five-page decision said, because their work stoppage was a lockout, not a strike. Under the state law governing Temple, unemployment compensation is due when a company locks out employees, but not when they strike.
NEWS
June 12, 2010 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University Hospital's nurses and allied health professionals are eligible for unemployment compensation during their nearly month-long work stoppage, the Pennsylvania Bureau of Unemployment Compensation said in a decision released late Friday. And the hospital will have to foot the bill. The workers are eligible for unemployment compensation, the five-page decision said, because their 28-day work stoppage in April is considered a lock out, not a strike. Under the state law governing Temple and its employees, workers are eligible for unemployment compensation when a company locks out is employees, but not when they strike.
NEWS
August 20, 1986 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Under a yellow tent at a side gate the four steelworkers sat - Luciano, Petrizzi, Lattanzi and Calvello - their eight hours of lockout duty winding to a close. Between them, the four men had 121 years at the Fairless Works - Vince Lattanzi, in fact, was hired 34 years ago to help construct the sprawling Falls Township plant - then U.S. Steel Corp., now USX. They had spent their day - Monday, the 18th day of the work stoppage - sitting around talking, eating and waving to the truck drivers going in and out of the gate, presumably to and from the plant's still-stocked supply depot.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 270 registered nurses at Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital went on strike early yesterday morning, temporarily blocking vehicles that brought in replacement nurses. In preparation for the work stoppage, MCP, a Tenet Healthcare Corp. hospital, shut down its trauma center on Thursday and decreased the number of patients admitted. Its emergency room remains open. MCP yesterday brought in about 50 traveling nurses employed by a Denver-based agency hired by Tenet.
SPORTS
October 8, 2010 | By Paul Domowitch
It can't happen, right? No way the NFL owners and players are dumb enough to kill their $8 billion-a-year golden goose. No way this insane game of chicken the two sides are playing is going to continue into next spring and summer and fall and threaten the 2011 season. Right? Wrong, says one former league executive. "I think there's going to be a work-stoppage," said Carl Peterson, who spent 19 years as the president and general manager of the Kansas City Chiefs before resigning in 2008.
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SPORTS
January 29, 2013 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
IT'S HAPPENED before and it will happen again, and if Mike Knuble had his druthers it will happen more often in the years to come. But it's still one of the more entertaining facets of hockey, watching two players side to side on a bench, one born somewhere around the time of the other's first foray into the professional game. So the other night, as the camera zeroed in on a conversation between Scott Laughton and Mike Knuble on the bench in Florida, it was natural to wonder: What on earth could they be talking about?
SPORTS
January 18, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Players, coaches, and fans weren't the only ones who suffered during the NHL's 113-day lockout. The broadcasters also felt the misery - and they didn't go to Europe to keep sharp. Being off for so long, "you get yourself out of a rhythm," said Steve Coates, the TV analyst who kept busy during the work stoppage by helping run his construction business. "This was my third lockout, and I never dreamt they'd blow it up again. " With the NHL iced, Tim Saunders, the Flyers' play-by-play radio voice, covered some of the Adirondack Phantoms' AHL games on the Flyers' website.
SPORTS
January 8, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 5:30 Sunday morning, Flyers winger Scott Hartnell texted the good news to his teammates. "Deal done, boys. " When Jody Shelley read Hartnell's text that the NHL's 113-day labor dispute had ended, he did a double take. "I didn't know whether to believe him," Shelley, the Flyers' enforcer, said Sunday afternoon. "I was like, 'Yeah, right.' And then I did a little research on Twitter, and it was blowing up. " Hartnell wasn't fibbing. The NHL and the players' union reached a tentative agreement at around 5 a.m. on a 10-year collective bargaining agreement, putting an end to a work stoppage that lasted almost four months.
SPORTS
December 13, 2012 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Face it. Most of us only do things when faced with a deadline. For the NHL and the players union - which will resume talks, with federal mediators by their sides, on Wednesday - that deadline is almost upon them. From here, the sides have just two weeks, maximum, to get a deal done. Why two weeks? Gary Bettman, the NHL commissioner, says teams need to play at least a 48-game season to protect the game's supposed integrity. (The game's integrity has disappeared because of the third work stoppage under Bettman, but that's another story.)
BUSINESS
November 14, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The world of Twinkies and Wonder Bread threatened to crumble Monday, as a nationwide strike continued and Hostess Brands Inc., the bankrupt owner of the historic products, said it would close three bakeries, eliminating 627 jobs. The closures in Seattle, St. Louis, and Cincinnati spared Hostess' Northeast Philadelphia bakery, where 330 members of Local 6 of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union stopped working at 12:01 a.m. Saturday to protest wage and benefit cuts approved last month by a bankruptcy judge.
SPORTS
November 10, 2012 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Fehr, executive director of the NHL Players' Association, confirmed after Thursday's five-hour meeting that the league responded to proposals made by the players' union, but both sides were tight-lipped on the progress that was made. The proposals regarded revenue-sharing and the players' share of hockey-related revenue, and both were reportedly rejected by the NHL. The owners want an immediate 50-50 split in hockey-related revenue, but the players are trying to have a "phase-in" period, with the 50-50 divide not occurring until the third year of the collective bargaining agreement.
SPORTS
September 19, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE FLORIDA PANTHERS announced the layoffs of an unknown number of staff members Tuesday, only the third full day of the NHL's lockout. The Panthers are thought to be the NHL's second team to publicly announce layoffs since the league's collective bargaining agreement with its players expired at 11:59 p.m. on Saturday and ushered in the league's fourth work stoppage in the last 20 years. The Ottawa Senators already have had layoffs, and full-time employees have been placed on a reduced work week.
SPORTS
September 18, 2012 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - Day 2 of the NHL lockout saw no changes from either side Monday, as talks between the league and the NHLPA remain unscheduled. The NHL locked out the players over the weekend, when the collective-bargaining agreement expired at 11:59 p.m. Saturday. It's the NHL's fourth work stoppage in the last 20 years. NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly and NHLPA special counsel Steve Fehr have spoken informally since the lockout began, and may do so again on Tuesday. But nothing official will resume until at least Wednesday between commissioner Gary Bettman and NHLPA executive director Donald Fehr.
SPORTS
September 18, 2012 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer
ON SUNDAY, just hours after NHL commissioner Gary Bettman officially locked out players for the third time in his 20-year reign, both sides in this labor dispute took to the web to continue to spin their tales. Bettman sent a message to the fans through the league's website. The players association used a video featuring faces like Sidney Crosby and Jonathan Toews on their own page to send their message to fans. Here is where things stood Sunday: 1) The NHL and NHLPA still had not scheduled a new, formal bargaining session to continue negotiations.
SPORTS
September 17, 2012 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
You can call them the Negotiations to Nowhere, but that would be too kind. Instead, let's give Gary Bettman and Don Fehr the real synopsis of the NHL labor talks: an insult to the fans. It's insulting mostly because Bettman, the NHL commissioner who smugly believes the fans will always be there, has seemed intent on getting a work stoppage and sending the players a message. It's insulting that, in a downtrodden economy in which many fans can't afford the NHL's inflated ticket prices, the millionaire players and ultra-rich owners couldn't come up with a compromise and have a new collective-bargaining agreement in place.
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