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NEWS
May 7, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
A 9,000-gallon chemical storage tank at a Bucks County water treatment plant sprang a leak Thursday morning but the chemical was quickly contained by a county hazardous materials team, officials said. The leak of ferric chloride, a chemical used to treat water, was at the Lower Bucks County Joint Municipal Authority plant in Levittown, said county spokeswoman Juliet Kelchner. The chemical did not "go into the environment" and there was no concern about the health of people nearby, Kelchner said.
NEWS
May 7, 2016
A part-time worker at a Chester County farm has been charged with stealing more than $900,000 from his employers to pay for luxury vehicles, a trip to the Bahamas, and student loans, police said. Clifton K. Willson, 35, of Bryn Mawr, was arrested Thursday and faces 299 charges of theft, forgery, and related offenses. He is accused of stealing 148 blank checks from Esther and Paul Gansky while he worked as a painter on their Heartwood Farm on Providence Road in Willistown Township.
NEWS
May 4, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Seven child-welfare workers in Philadelphia were fired in February and March in connection with at least two false reports about home visits, according to state officials. Rachel Kostelac, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Human Services, said three were workers from Community Umbrella Agencies contracted by the city to handle cases, and four were with subcontracted foster-care agencies. The report of the firings followed remarks Friday by a state DHS official, who said child-welfare workers in Philadelphia had falsified reports in response to high caseloads.
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
The tears were there, as usual, under a gray sky that wept along with those gathered Friday by the Delaware River for Workers' Memorial Day, to honor people killed on the job. But there was anger as well, and it boiled over at the annual breakfast that preceded a solemn march on Columbus Boulevard to a rainy memorial service at Penn's Landing. With a roar not unlike the sound of the train that mowed down two Amtrak workers on April 3, waves of railway workers rose to their feet Friday in rage and sadness in response to a call from their union leader.
NEWS
April 25, 2016
Cheryl RiceĀ is the author of "Where Have I Been All My Life?" Mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, ketchup, onion, and pickle. Though I haven't worked at Burger King for 30 years, I reflexively rattled off those ingredients to my husband as we watched a recent news report showing fast-food workers picketing for higher wages. And with pride I recalled carefully layering each ingredient on sizzling burgers, topping it all off with a sesame seed bun. (I made a mean Whopper in my day. The messier the better.)
BUSINESS
April 24, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
The nation's oldest workers are dying on the job - losing their lives at more than triple the rate of all workers. The U.S. Labor Department reported last week that 1,691 workers over age 55 died in 2014 - the highest number ever recorded for this group, and more than one in three of the 4,821 people killed on the job that year. Workers over 65 were particularly affected, with 10.7 per 100,000 workers killed on the job, compared with the all-worker injury rate of 3.4 per 100,000.
NEWS
April 21, 2016
I HAD TO RESPOND to Stu Bykofsky's column of April 15 the city's Deferred Retirement Option Program, or DROP. I have been a city employee for 26 years. I am so tired of you columnists writing one-sided articles. You want City Council to end DROP for everyone except police officers and firefighters? Why? They don't collect Social Security because they don't pay into Social Security. You didn't mention that in your article. You also did not mention that the unionized employees who utilize the DROP program have never returned to city employment.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
It couldn't have been a nicer day for a protest Thursday, as activists - fast-food and home health workers seeking a raise, the Sierra Club, Temple students opposing a stadium, and community people against stop-and-frisk, - marched down Broad Street, banging drums, carrying banners, and shouting slogans. "This is what democracy looks like," hundreds yelled as they walked toward the day's largest rally, at Broad and Arch Streets. Police closed Broad Street. Among those leading the parade was Shymara Jones, 23, of Philadelphia, a Popeyes employee who has been pushing for a $15-an-hour wage for fast-food workers since the national movement kicked off in Philadelphia two years ago. She earns $8.25 an hour, up from $7.25, Pennsylvania's minimum wage, mirroring the national rate.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders have both weighed in on the strike against Verizon Communications Inc., supporting the 39,000 workers who set up pickets at 6 a.m. Wednesday. Clinton walked with striking workers in Midtown Manhattan on Wednesday. "I am disappointed to learn that negotiations have broken down," she said in an earlier statement from her campaign office. "Verizon should come back to the bargaining table with a fair offer for their workers.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
LAST-DITCH talks between Verizon and the unions representing 39,000 workers failed Tuesday night, setting up a strike to begin at 6 o'clock Wednesday morning. Workers from New England to West Virginia, all employed by Verizon Communication Inc.'s landline division, which also handles fiber-optic cable installation, sales, and service, will go off the job. Hundreds are expected to gather in Philadelphia outside Verizon's building at Ninth and Race streets for a rally at 8 a.m. Wednesday, said union official James Gardler, president of Communications Workers of America Local 13000 in Philadelphia.
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