CollectionsWorker
IN THE NEWS

Worker

NEWS
October 18, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Official assurances that the city is fully prepared to deal with Ebola collided Thursday with impassioned pleas from front-line health-care workers who said they need more and better equipment and far more training to safely care for patients infected with the deadly virus. During a City Council hearing that lasted nearly four hours, top leaders from the city's public health agencies, fire department, airport, and major hospitals said that while Ebola presents some unique challenges, they have been effectively controlling other serious threats such as anthrax, bird flu, and HIV for decades.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN GREGORY SPEARMAN pushed his mother through the West Philadelphia neighborhood around 52nd and Market streets in her wheelchair, he felt as if he were chaperoning an important somebody. Everybody seemed to know Armetha Spearman, and she seemed to know everybody around the busy neighborhood. "I thought I was pushing a celebrity," Gregory said. "Especially the kids recognized her. " Armetha Spearman, onetime employee of the old Philco company and a caregiver who went to the homes of the ill and home-bound to lend them her love and concern, a devoted mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, died Oct. 9. She was 84. Armetha had a special fondness for children, and they recognized her interest in their welfare and education.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph A. Mason, 85, of Barrington, a former hotel maintenance worker in Philadelphia and South Jersey, died of complications from a stroke Monday, Sept. 29, at the Genesis Health Care Center in Voorhees. Mr. Mason was born in South Philadelphia. He ended his high school studies early to support his family after his father was called to Army service during World War II, his daughter Diane Mason said. Mr. Mason began his maintenance career at Abbotts Dairies before working at the Bellevue Stratford hotel in the 1960s, the Rittenhouse Hotel in the 1970s, and the Garden State Inn in the 1980s, she said.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
SHAMIRA Hawkins-Worthey was supposed to be helping children and parents by providing them with public transportation tokens to get to court hearings, medical appointments and other destinations related to the Department of Human Services. Instead, Hawkins-Worthey, 30, a DHS social worker services manager, helped herself by stealing more than $24,000 in tokens and fraudulent overtime payments, officials said yesterday. "I have no words for the actions of this person," Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams said.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former city Department of Human Services worker was charged Monday with allegedly stealing nearly $18,000 in SEPTA tokens, and claiming more than $6,000 in overtime for work she did not perform, prosecutors said. Shamira Hawkins-Worthey, 30, of the 3000 block of North Ninth Street, was responsible for providing SEPTA tokens to clients so they could travel to court hearings, doctor's visits, or for other reasons related to DHS, prosecutors said. In September 2013, a supervisor noticed that Hawkins-Worthey had requested 300 tokens during a two-day period - an amount considered unusually high, prosecutors said.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A post office worker in Philadelphia has been charged with allegedly stealing nearly $29,000 intended for customer money orders, city prosecutors said Monday. Felicia Townsend, 35, of the 400 block of North Simpson Street in West Philadelphia, was arrested Sept. 30 and charged with receiving stolen property, theft, unlawful use of a computer, and tampering with public records. Townsend allegedly voided money orders after the customer left the post office and then pocketed the money, prosecutors said.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
A Philadelphia Zoo employee was killed Monday morning after a golf cart apparently fell on him, police said. Zoo communications director Dana Lombardo said the man, whose identity authorities have not disclosed, was 59 and had been a mechanic for 14 years. His duties included working on the zoo's fleet of golf carts. It was unclear to police and zoo officials how the cart ended up on top of the mechanic. "Basically, we had a really traumatic incident happen here this morning," Lombardo said.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
THE PHILADELPHIA Zoo's lone mechanic was killed in the zoo's garage yesterday when he was crushed by a golf cart that fell on top of him as he was repairing it, according to police and the man's co-workers. When Jim Borger, 57, a married father of three, didn't show up to a regularly scheduled meeting at 10 a.m. yesterday, his supervisor sent another employee to find him, according to a zoo co-worker who asked not to be identified. Borger was found under the golf cart in the garage at 11:08 a.m., police said.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A SEPTA janitorial worker and the transit agency are fighting over the worker's dismissal for refusing to work on holy days, including Rosh Hashanah. Romel McAlpin of Germantown was fired last year by SEPTA for refusing to work on Rosh Hashanah and Oct. 12, his Sabbath. McAlpin, according to legal documents, is an adherent of the Israelite Church of God in Jesus Christ, a sect that observes Jewish holy days and marks the Sabbath from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. McAlpin, a maintenance custodian in subway tunnels, notified SEPTA of his religious beliefs shortly after he was hired in May 2012, according to a legal brief filed by Transport Workers Union Local 234. SEPTA permitted McAlpin to trade days off with other workers to accommodate his beliefs, but only with workers with less seniority, citing seniority clauses in its union contract.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly half of what Pennsylvania's workers' compensation program pays for prescription drugs goes to physicians who dispense them directly to patients, bypassing pharmacies, a lucrative practice that is limited by many states and not reimbursed at all by private insurance, Medicare or Medicaid, according to a new report. Although few doctors take advantage of the loophole, the cost differential can be enormous. A single Percocet cost an average 64 cents at a pharmacy last year, the Workers Compensation Research Institute reported Monday, vs. $3.55 when dispensed by a physician.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|