CollectionsWorker
IN THE NEWS

Worker

NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Dorothy Mae Gill Leatherberry, 95, of West Philadelphia, a Social Security Administration employee and an active church member, died of heart failure Thursday, Aug. 4, at Lankenau Medical Center. Mrs. Leatherberry was born in Houston, the daughter of Adolphus Gill and Nettie Maxey-Gill. The story goes that Mrs. Leatherberry stepped on a nail as a girl, and her foot became so infected that she could not walk. Doctors had given up, but a bishop in Texas healed her, setting in motion Mrs. Leatherberry's early acceptance of Christianity, her family said.
NEWS
August 9, 2016
ISSUE | UNIONS A matter of respect In "Coping with a union workforce" (Philly.com, Wednesday), Team Clean president Donna Allie dismissed some of her employees, saying, "Some people don't want to do anything. Then they run to the union for protection. " I've been a cleaner for 16 years and a proud member of Service Employees International Union Local 32BJ for 11 years. We work hard and take pride in our work. Our hard work makes Team Clean and many other businesses profitable.
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
Solvay Specialty Polymers, a plastics company linked to contaminated water in several Gloucester County towns, was fined $115,000 this week by the federal workplace safety agency for exposing employees to flammable gas, among other charges. During a scheduled inspection of the company's West Deptford facilities this February, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration found three repeat and eight serious violations, including several violations of process safety management regulations, the agency announced Thursday.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Everyone wore red on Thursday: the Phillies fans and the Unite Here pickets, in their union's trademark red T-shirts, who were marching by the hundreds outside Citizens Bank Park. Just like the Phillies, defeated after the San Francisco Giants scored a tie-breaking 10th-inning run, the ballpark's African American workers are losing, as well, said the union that represents them. That's because they tend to work disproportionately in the lowest-paying jobs, the union said. "It's a huge racial disparity," said Dermot Delude-Dix, a researcher with Unite Here Local 274, the hospitality workers union now in contract talks with Aramark, the Philadelphia-based global catering company that employs them at the ballpark.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai and Jacqueline L. Urgo, STAFF WRITERS
The Trump Taj Mahal casino in Atlantic City will close after Labor Day weekend, in part because of a workers' strike, its owner said Wednesday. "Currently the Taj is losing multimillions a month, and now with this strike, we see no path to profitability," Tony Rodio, head of Taj Mahal manager Tropicana Entertainment Inc., said in a statement. About 1,000 workers have been striking since July 1 after negotiations fell apart over health and pension benefits. "How petty.
NEWS
August 4, 2016
ISSUE | HOST CITY Top-notch police work A tip of the hat to the Philadelphia Police Department ("Police kept the peace," Saturday). As a former assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, I have participated in the planning of dozens of large-scale international events. In this post-9/11 era, with the threat of terrorism looming over our shoulders, Philadelphia police balanced huge security issues with the freedoms protected in this great nation. The police deserve a huge "Thank you. " and the city should be proud of their performance.
NEWS
August 4, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
The office of embattled Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane will pay $150,000 to settle a lawsuit filed by a former employee who alleged that Kane fired him in retaliation for recommending that she dismiss a top aide for sexual harassment. George Moore, a former human resources analyst for the Attorney General's Office, will split most of the money with his attorney, according to the settlement, made public Tuesday by Kane's office. Ending the case now will save money and avoid a long legal battle, First Deputy Attorney General Bruce L. Castor Jr. said in statement.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
VINELAND, N.J. - In this very poor, rural pocket of South Jersey, the locals are grateful for what they have, especially jobs. But the lives of 370 families were tossed off-balance when the parent company of the Italian-foods brand Progresso - whose manufacturing plant has been a fixture at 500 W. Elmer Rd. since 1970 - announced its "tentative decision" to close the plant by early 2018. General Mills, the Minneapolis-based food giant that has operated the plant since 2001, delivered the news - which one union leader called a "kick to the stomach" - July 21. It came just two months after United Food & Commercial Workers Local 152 ratified a four-year contract that all but ensured job security at the Vineland plant during its term.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Signe Wilkinson, Staff Writer
"Democrats think making laws solves things, but people will get around them [the laws] like water around a rock," says Kyle Doebler of Manayunk, whose Windows Done Right crew was up on ladders at a house near 20th and Bainbridge. He was one of the bearded, tool-belted, working-with-their-hands-in-90-degree-heat, "hardworking, middle-class" men who were much discussed inside the Democratic and Republican conventions. I chatted up maybe 20 of these workers who were too busy making Philadelphia housing great again to attend conventions.
NEWS
July 27, 2016 | By Vibha Kannan, Staff Writer
THE PLAYGROUND at Jenks Academy for the Arts and Sciences in Chestnut Hill - with its spacious sandbox and chunky wood structures - is a place of imagination, as Eden Kainer describes it. In a city of cracked asphalt schoolyards, Jenks' playground is a model of green architecture. But in the cash-starved Philadelphia School District, playground equipment and green fields are secondary to more urgent needs - such as replacing fire alarms, hiring nurses, buying books, and repairing decades-old buildings.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|