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BUSINESS
February 5, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
So who does have jurisdiction to settle claims by union carpenters and Teamsters that the Convention Center has wrongfully denied them the right to work in the building? Maybe nobody. In July, the National Labor Relations Board said it did not have the right to hear the case because the unions' beef was with the state-run Convention Center Authority, and it doesn't have jurisdiction over state entities. Hearing that decision, the unions turned to the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board, which handles state labor disputes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
There are few true American heroes whose reputations haven't been tarnished with time. Deaf and blind Helen Keller and her indefatigable teacher, Annie Sullivan, are two of them. Media Theatre's production of The Miracle Worker is only the latest to introduce William Gibson's adaptation of Keller's autobiography, The Story of My Life , to another generation, but it's a welcome introduction. Gibson's take on the Keller-Sullivan relationship has seen iterations on radio, television, film (three times)
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration has put a price tag on fixing the Department of Licenses and Inspections: $13.9 million, which would cover 110 new city employees and their equipment. The department has about 300 employees and an annual budget of $27.6 million. Under the changes outlined in a draft report titled "L&I 2015 Plan for a Safer City," the agency would gain 83 employees. An additional 27 would go to other city agencies, including the Fire Department. The report is the administration's response to recommendations made by mayor's special independent advisory commission, which in October suggested 37 steps for reforming L&I. The commission - created in response to the 2013 Center City building collapse that killed six people and injured 13 - found that L&I was underfunded, had too many responsibilities, and would better operate as two agencies: a Department of Buildings and a Department of Business Compliance.
NEWS
February 3, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
    Randolph Sanders was worried - his boss was onto him. He knew Kim Jones, his supervisor at Families and Schools Together, an after-school outreach program, suspected he was misappropriating funds, law enforcement sources said Sunday. He knew that she had scheduled a meeting for that very morning with Department of Human Services officials, the sources said. He was worried she would report him. He was worried that he would lose his job. So, law enforcement sources said, he packed a gun in his duffel bag. He knew her morning routine - that she caught the bus at 12th and Jefferson Streets on her way to work.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A WEEK AFTER his face was plastered across social media, the man accused of brutally beating a teen on a SEPTA trolley turned himself in to police. Damon Oliver, 40, surrendered to detectives at East Division yesterday morning, police said. He has been charged with terroristic threats, simple assault and reckless endangerment after allegedly assaulting a 17-year-old girl on the Route 15 trolley on Jan. 21. Oliver, a North Philly resident, works for the city's Parks and Recreation Department, according to spokeswoman Krystle Parram.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Craigslist post looked promising: "Immediate help needed $16hr. + OT," read the headline, followed by "Help needed at the Pennsylvania Convention Center Philadelphia over the course of the next six weeks. " The posting went up Tuesday evening. By Wednesday morning, the number listed on the post - leading to the Convention Center's labor supply office - was ringing nonstop with dozens of people seeking work, said the center's chief executive, John McNichol. By midafternoon, the post been pulled from the website, flagged as a possible fraud.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
DECADES AGO - before houses sprang up between his block of 12th Street and Broad Street - Wes Hatton used the open space in his North Philadelphia neighborhood to teach his daughter and her friend Kim Jones how to ride bikes. Hatton, who has lived on 12th Street near Jefferson for 55 years, knew Jones all her life. He can't grasp the fact that someone killed her Tuesday morning, firing a single bullet into the back of her skull just steps from Hatton's and Jones' side-by-side rowhouses.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the latest twist on the continuing legal tangle over whether workers are defined as employees or independent contractors, the New Jersey Supreme Court said Wednesday that workers are considered to be employees unless the company can prove otherwise. The case, filed in 2010 in federal court in New Jersey, was closely-watched by business owners and unions. Three New Jersey men, two from the area, who delivered Sleepy's mattresses contended they were improperly classified as independent contractors, causing them to lose benefits and forcing them to cover expenses that should have been paid by Sleepy's L.L.C.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
FOR KIM JONES, life was about caring for others. The mother spent the last several years working at an organization that helps abused and neglected children. But with the pull of a trigger yesterday morning - a single bullet fired into the dedicated child-advocacy worker's head as she went off to work - that was all gone. Police said Jones, 56, left her North Philadelphia home about 9 a.m. and walked less than a block to a bus stop at 12th and Jefferson streets, just as she had each day for several years on her way to her job at Center City-based Turning Points for Children.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey has landed a $29.4 million federal grant to help displaced Atlantic City casino workers affected by recent closings, officials said Tuesday. The National Emergency Grant through the U.S. Department of Labor will be used for training programs to help the workers learn skills for jobs in new fields. Atlantic City lost four of its 12 casinos last year, throwing more than 8,000 people out of work, roughly a fifth of the casino workforce. The gaming industry has struggled to stay afloat amid competition from nearby states' casinos.
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