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NEWS
July 27, 2016 | By Vibha Kannan, Staff Writer
THE PLAYGROUND at Jenks Academy for the Arts and Sciences in Chestnut Hill - with its spacious sandbox and chunky wood structures - is a place of imagination, as Eden Kainer describes it. In a city of cracked asphalt schoolyards, Jenks' playground is a model of green architecture. But in the cash-starved Philadelphia School District, playground equipment and green fields are secondary to more urgent needs - such as replacing fire alarms, hiring nurses, buying books, and repairing decades-old buildings.
NEWS
July 26, 2016
ISSUE | PHILA. AIRPORT Workers mistreated The fight for livable wages and appropriate working conditions has reached Philadelphia International Airport (" Bumpy skies ," Wednesday). I marched with the airport workers who walked off the job on Tuesday. Their concerns about low wages, no benefits, and mistreatment are real, and they're urgent. The city got behind these wheelchair attendants, sky caps, aircraft cabin cleaners, and bag handlers in 2014 and overwhelmingly passed a ballot measure to raise the wage.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
About 150 health-care and service workers at Chestnut Hill Hospital participated in a strike Saturday, calling for higher wages. The strike was organized by the Service Employees International Union Healthcare Pennsylvania, which represents certified nursing assistants, emergency room technicians, workers who move patients around in wheelchairs and stretchers, secretaries, food workers and cleaners. Gary Canada, 54, vice president of the Chestnut Hill faction of SEIU Healthcare PA, and a certified nursing assistant at the hospital, at 8835 Germantown Ave. in Chestnut Hill, said the union has been in negotiations with hospital management for about two months.
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: While our daughter was on vacation with our small grandkids, she bought them postcards and suggested they write us about their vacation. She said she laughed when the kids finished with the cards because she hadn't realized they didn't know how to write a postcard. The children had turned the cards sideways and had written across the entire card from top to bottom. Not wanting to hurt their feelings, she found a half-inch space on one side and, in tiny print, wrote our names and address.
NEWS
July 21, 2016
ISSUE | PHILADELPHIA AIRPORT Workers should consider impact of strike In the mid-1960s, the American Society of Anesthesiologists conducted its annual meeting in Philadelphia. That meeting has never returned to this city. Why? A hotel workers' strike forced attendees to carry their own bags, make their own beds, and suffer the other inconveniences of understaffed hotels. Without passing judgment on their cause, I would remind the workers at Philadelphia International Airport to seriously consider the impact of their threatened strike during the Democratic National Convention ("Some airport workers vote to strike," July 13)
BUSINESS
July 21, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
About 600 members and supporters of Service Employees International Union marched peacefully Tuesday, chanting and waving union banners along Philadelphia International Airport's departures roadway and demanding higher wages and better working conditions for nonunion PHL workers. Six busloads of demonstrators wearing purple "32BJ SEIU" T-shirts arrived in buses outside Terminal A and marched to Terminal F. They were escorted by Philadelphia police and sat, at one point, in front of Terminal C for speeches.
NEWS
July 20, 2016
THE LONG and bitter battle between management and blue-collar employees in Philadelphia government is apparently over. A truce was declared by Mayor Kenney and the city's largest union last week when the sides reached a tentative agreement on a new, four-year contract. It covers the nearly 8,000 members of the city's blue-collar union, AFSCME District Council 33 and provides pay increases totaling $109 million between now and 2020. The news came late Friday, absent the protracted public fights, rallies, and inflammatory rhetoric that characterized union contract negotiations during Mayor Nutter's term in office - when many unions went for years without a contract.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITER
Some delegates to the Democratic National Convention say they will fly into other airports rather than risk crossing any picket line set up by airport workers at the Philadelphia International Airport. The workers - who clean airplane interiors, handle baggage at the curb, direct passengers through airport lines and help people in wheelchairs - are employed by subcontractors who work for the major airlines. On Tuesday, nearly 500 of them cast ballots saying they would be willing to strike during the convention, although no strike date has been set. Spokeswomen for both the airport and the airport's largest airline, American Airlines, say any protests by the workers will not disrupt customer service.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Ron Blount doesn't care. Doesn't care whether the entire city, or state, or Democratic Party gets angry at the city's cab drivers if they decide to strike during the Democratic National Convention July 25-28. "We've been screwed, and we're going to screw you back. When they come here, Philadelphia is going to be in chaos, because working poor people are being screwed in this city. The schools are falling apart," said Blount, leader of Unified Taxi Workers Alliance. "And they are coming here to have a party?
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