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NEWS
August 30, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
With a wave of Atlantic City casino closings expected to put more than 6,000 people out of work, Gov. Christie announced Thursday that the state would join with union and business groups to open an employment resource center in the Shore resort. The Atlantic City Convention Center will play host to the facility, which opens at 9 a.m. Wednesday. It will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, according to Unite Here Local 54, which represents many casino workers. The state will deploy 35 staffers to the center, where workers from the soon-to-close Showboat, Revel, and Trump Plaza will be able to learn about programs and services available to them, including unemployment benefits.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christina Regusters, accused of abducting and raping a 5-year-old girl from her West Philadelphia elementary school last year, was described in court Tuesday as a responsible employee of the day-care center the victim attended after school. "She was very responsible. She fulfilled her job and was a good worker-performer," testified April Walker, co-owner of Heaven's Little Angels day-care center, during the second day of Regusters' trial in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court. "She was excellent," testified Sherrell Carter, the Heaven's Little Angels teacher who was assigned Regusters as an assistant.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
IT'S BEEN a long time coming, but we hope the 10,000 members of the city's blue-collar union approve the tentative contract reached with the city last week. Most members of District Council 33 have gone for seven years without a raise or without other pay increases normally given for longevity and promotions. The average DC33 member earned $35,000 in 2007. Today, when you account for inflation, that salary is equal to $30,000. DC33 members blamed Mayor Nutter for their troubles.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - When gambling was being proposed for Atlantic City 38 years ago, most religious denominations opposed casinos. They viewed gambling as a vice that could destroy families and communities. Now, many of the same churches are standing firmly by the casino workers, a number of whom fill their pews on Sundays, who are expected to lose their jobs in massive numbers, starting Labor Day weekend with the closure of the Showboat and Revel. Many houses of worship are offering counseling for the affected workers, increased food pantry hours, or just someone to pray with.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By Franziska Holzschuh, Inquirer Staff Writer
Renee Shai Levine loved reading to children, not only infants but also elementary students. She was convinced it would "encourage them to read and listen," reinforce their development, and prepare them for their future lives, her son Stefan said. "She felt everyone could achieve excellence. " Mrs. Levine, 82, a school social worker, died Saturday, Aug. 17, after a long battle with cancer. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mrs. Levine graduated from Midwood High School in 1948 and Brooklyn College in 1952.
NEWS
August 16, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
OCEAN CITY - Unrest spurred by a spate of upcoming casino closures in Atlantic City confronted Gov. Christie on Thursday at the Shore, as workers showed up at a town-hall-style event and demanded that Christie take action. Christie, meanwhile, told the crowd in Ocean City that there was a limit to what he could do. "The government can't order private businesses to do things," Christie told those gathered for the event at the Ocean City Music Pier. "And you don't want to live in a world where we do. " At the same time, Christie said his administration was working to find jobs for the soon-to-swell ranks of the unemployed in Atlantic City, where the number of casinos that have closed or are slated to close grew to four this week.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The 3,200 workers who have made Revel home the last 28 months are hoping against hope that the casino snags a buyer before its targeted Sept. 10 closing to save their jobs and a key piece of Atlantic City's skyline. If the casino gets shuttered, the vast majority of them will be unemployed and thrown into a glutted labor market that will soon include 2,100 workers laid off at Showboat if it, too, doesn't secure a buyer by Aug. 31, and 1,100 at Trump Plaza when that casino closes on Sept.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A VETERAN SEPTA electrical worker was recovering last night after a close call on the subway tracks in Center City, officials said. The unidentified worker, 52, was held overnight at Hahnemann University Hospital after he was clipped by a Market-Frankford El train, according to a law-enforcement source who said "his prognosis is optimistic. " All things considered, the worker, a 27-year veteran of the transit authority, was extremely lucky: His brush with the train left him with only a long gash on his forehead and a knee injury, the source said.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The fallout over mass layoffs from three potential casino closings next month could have a severe impact on the Shore economy, as those whose livelihoods depend on a thriving casino industry brace for the worst. Local retailers, restaurants, and other businesses that rely on casino workers are expecting a hit. Experts say the region could also see an exodus of laid-off workers, especially among those who live in Atlantic City, as they seek jobs and futures elsewhere. About 6,500 workers from Showboat, Trump Plaza, and possibly Revel could all lose their jobs from Aug. 31 to Sept.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Stacey Burling and Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last week's shooting at an outpatient office on the campus of Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital was a reminder that the healing professions can be surprisingly dangerous. Organized nurses and emergency doctors have complained for years about violence at work that is common and frightening but that won't grab headlines like the case in which a patient opened fire, killing a caseworker before he was stopped by a psychiatrist who had his own gun and returned fire. "People get frustrated because everybody pays attention to this particular incident, but don't realize that . . . nurses and other health-care providers are victims of violence every day," said Deena Brecher, president of the Emergency Nurses Association.
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