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NEWS
June 13, 2003 | By David L. Crawford
One night last week, the parties in the Pennsylvania Convention Center debate invited me to join them in a discussion of remarks I had made earlier in the day at the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce about a proposed draft contract. I explained my concerns about the draft, and we had a long, intense conversation about exhibitors' rights, pre-hung drape, procedures for selecting foremen and journeymen, unmet labor calls, shift premiums, and composite jurisdictions. (Don't worry what all that means; you don't need to know.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Cynthia Henry, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Help wanted" signs in the year 2000 will attract a much different workforce than they do today. "We are undergoing the most dynamic changes in our socioeconomic system since the Industrial Revolution," Janice H. McElroy, executive director of the Pennsylvania Commission for Women, told about 60 members of the Main Line Chamber of Commerce at a luncheon Wednesday in Berwyn. In the next 10 years, the workforce will grow older and include more women, immigrants and minorities than ever before, she said.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Matt Freeman, Special to The Inquirer
Potential solutions to problems posed by changes in the nation's workforce are the subject of a conference called "Workforce 2000," scheduled for Friday at the Stouffer Valley Forge Hotel. Now that many "baby boomers" are entering their 30s and 40s, not enough people are entering the workforce, according to Maxine Ballen and Lois Lamdin, co-directors of the Business Development and Training Center, which is sponsoring the conference. The development and training center is in the Great Valley Corporate Center.
NEWS
March 12, 2007 | By TRACEE HUNT
The Rethinking Philadelphia special report on connecting young people to jobs ("Philly has work to do," Feb. 27) was a terrific public service on behalf of the thousands of talented and energetic young people in this city who seek employment, but who have far too few opportunities to obtain it. I especially appreciated the focus on programs that are working - activities that link youth with high-quality workplace experiences that can make a...
BUSINESS
October 6, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hobson "Hop" Gross, 78, has come to the age where, once in a while, he thinks about death. "Death is going to have to catch me," he said, "and I ain't setting home waiting for it. " More likely, Gross will be where he usually is, at his lab bench at Einstein Medical Center on Broad Street in Philadelphia. "As long as I have my health and strength, I want to keep working," he said. Why change after 55 years? Gross started as an elevator operator at Einstein's southern division in 1959, when the minimum wage was a dollar and a gallon of gas was a quarter.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2007
Employers sliced payrolls by 4,000 in August, the first drop in four years, according to the Labor Department. The decline provided a stark sign that a painful credit crunch that has unnerved Wall Street is putting a strain on the national economy. The snapshot of the jobs climate also showed that the unemployment rate held steady at 4.6 percent, mainly because hundreds of thousands of people left the workforce for any number of reasons. Job losses in construction, manufacturing, transportation and government swamped gains in retail, education and health care, and leisure and hospitality.
NEWS
February 25, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, STAFF WRITER
ARRIS Group Inc., the cable-box and telecom-gear manufacturer with major operations in Horsham, is expected to cut about 10 percent of its workforce as it consolidates operations with recent acquisition Pace plc, a company spokeswoman said Tuesday. ARRIS, based in Georgia, recently closed the $2.1 billion deal for Pace. ARRIS employs 8,000 to 8,500 globally, including about 1,000 in Horsham. The Horsham operations will be affected by the cost-cutting program. bfernandez@phillynews.com 215-854-5897 @bobfernandez1  
BUSINESS
March 14, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
In the course of a day, you will likely sit in a chair, talk on the phone, brush your teeth, maybe blow-dry your hair - and not give much thought to the design involved in any of it. As an industrial designer, Karin Copeland spent 16 years constantly thinking about such things. "We're keen-eyed observers of what people do, how they do it, why they do it," Copeland says of her craft, or rather what was her craft. Although, as executive director of the Arts + Business Council of Greater Philadelphia (ABC)
NEWS
March 6, 2012
Chester County Hospital and Health System in West Chester trimmed its workforce by 45, or 3 percent, last week "in response to downward pressure on health care revenues across the industry," according to a statement. The hospital, with 218 staffed beds, reported a 1 percent increase in revenue, to $114 million from $112.8 million for the six months ended Dec. 31, according to bond disclosure documents. Over the same period, the hospital's operating profit fell 12.6 percent.
NEWS
June 1, 2010
IN GOOD TIMES or bad, feast or famine, the Daily News editorial board has one everlasting mantra, "Cut city jobs!" They love to use phrases like "Time of Reckoning for ALL of Us. " They speak as if the city work force hasn't budged an inch since we had a shade under 9,000 police officers and about 700 recreation workers in the late '70s. For a newspaper that has spent the last two months plastering their Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalists all over its pages, they apparently missed the white elephant standing in the newsroom.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My wife and I have been together for eight years. When we first met, I was in the military, and she was a bartender. Needless to say, she made far more money than I did at the time. Six months into our relationship, she got pregnant and quit her job. For the next seven years, she raised our children and went to school while I did whatever I had to do - working two jobs - to make enough to pay the bills. I am now out of the military. I have been at a company for six years, and we are finally reaching a point where we don't worry about money as much.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
As Mayor Kenney looks to spend millions on rehabbing Philadelphia libraries, parks, and recreation centers, City Council on Tuesday looked to ensure the workforce on those projects, and other city jobs, is diverse. Under legislation approved by a Council committee, the office that tracks workers' wages would also track diversity on job sites. Contractors who don't comply by trying to reach diversity goals could be barred from future city work. But compliance is not cut and dried.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
In the course of a day, you will likely sit in a chair, talk on the phone, brush your teeth, maybe blow-dry your hair - and not give much thought to the design involved in any of it. As an industrial designer, Karin Copeland spent 16 years constantly thinking about such things. "We're keen-eyed observers of what people do, how they do it, why they do it," Copeland says of her craft, or rather what was her craft. Although, as executive director of the Arts + Business Council of Greater Philadelphia (ABC)
NEWS
February 25, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, STAFF WRITER
ARRIS Group Inc., the cable-box and telecom-gear manufacturer with major operations in Horsham, is expected to cut about 10 percent of its workforce as it consolidates operations with recent acquisition Pace plc, a company spokeswoman said Tuesday. ARRIS, based in Georgia, recently closed the $2.1 billion deal for Pace. ARRIS employs 8,000 to 8,500 globally, including about 1,000 in Horsham. The Horsham operations will be affected by the cost-cutting program. bfernandez@phillynews.com 215-854-5897 @bobfernandez1  
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
As state funding continues to dwindle, the president of Rowan University on Wednesday pointed to "public-private partnerships" as a way to lessen the financial load on colleges. "We need to pass the buck on to other people, use other people's money to build our campus," Ali A. Houshmand said to laughter at a hearing of the New Jersey College Affordability Study Commission. His remarks echoed testimony he gave two years ago before a similar commission visiting his school's Glassboro campus.
NEWS
December 29, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Energy, utility, and construction companies need workers, but they often struggle to find the right recruits. "Number one, it's getting the word out that we're hiring. Number two, it's also getting the word out that a career in the energy industry is open to a broader population than job seekers may have thought," said Sally J. Nadler, who heads workforce development efforts at PSEG. The company is particularly looking to bring more women into jobs replacing gas mains, upgrading energy substations, and reading meters, she said.
NEWS
September 19, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
A member of City Council on Thursday called for a change to a long-standing city hiring policy that critics say has left Philadelphia's government workforce far less diverse than the citizenry it serves. The policy, known as the Rule of Two, limits the pool of applicants that can be considered for an open position to the two who score highest on the city's civil service exam. "We want to talk about equity in terms of gender and equity in terms of other minorities having an opportunity to be in positions of leadership and responsibility," said Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid the platitudes, YouthBuild student Bart Williams, who, for the occasion, replaced the construction training program's T-shirt with a pin-striped suit and polka-dotted pocket square, got to the point. "You say you'll help us," said Williams, who is in his early 20s, speaking to U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez and a gallery of state and local politicians at a roundtable discussion Thursday in Camden. "What about scholarships?" he asked. Perez, whose answer is below, was in Camden and Philadelphia "making house calls" and visiting programs to see Labor Department grants at work.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
By all rights, none of this should have happened to Joe Carbone. He was well-educated, and came from a politically connected family, but when he lost his job working for a politician, he sank into his sofa and even more deeply into depression, spending afternoons watching soaps and mornings avoiding neighbors at the supermarket. "If that happened to me, after only eight months out of work, when I had all those things going for me," Carbone said, he could imagine what happened to millions of long-term unemployed who lost jobs during the recession, and still were fruitlessly searching years later.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
From his second-floor window Monday afternoon, Vincent Ean eyed the vacant lot across North 16th Street. Men in suits circled a white tent. Ean snapped a photo with his smartphone and sent it to his fiancee. Last October, they bought their condo in Francisville for $262,500. He works in marketing and telecommutes for a company in New York. Progress in Francisville, he said, is apparent on a week-to-week basis. "It's growing," Ean said. "There are so many other neighborhoods in Philly.
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