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NEWS
June 13, 2003 | By David L. Crawford
One night last week, the parties in the Pennsylvania Convention Center debate invited me to join them in a discussion of remarks I had made earlier in the day at the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce about a proposed draft contract. I explained my concerns about the draft, and we had a long, intense conversation about exhibitors' rights, pre-hung drape, procedures for selecting foremen and journeymen, unmet labor calls, shift premiums, and composite jurisdictions. (Don't worry what all that means; you don't need to know.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Cynthia Henry, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Help wanted" signs in the year 2000 will attract a much different workforce than they do today. "We are undergoing the most dynamic changes in our socioeconomic system since the Industrial Revolution," Janice H. McElroy, executive director of the Pennsylvania Commission for Women, told about 60 members of the Main Line Chamber of Commerce at a luncheon Wednesday in Berwyn. In the next 10 years, the workforce will grow older and include more women, immigrants and minorities than ever before, she said.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Matt Freeman, Special to The Inquirer
Potential solutions to problems posed by changes in the nation's workforce are the subject of a conference called "Workforce 2000," scheduled for Friday at the Stouffer Valley Forge Hotel. Now that many "baby boomers" are entering their 30s and 40s, not enough people are entering the workforce, according to Maxine Ballen and Lois Lamdin, co-directors of the Business Development and Training Center, which is sponsoring the conference. The development and training center is in the Great Valley Corporate Center.
NEWS
March 12, 2007 | By TRACEE HUNT
The Rethinking Philadelphia special report on connecting young people to jobs ("Philly has work to do," Feb. 27) was a terrific public service on behalf of the thousands of talented and energetic young people in this city who seek employment, but who have far too few opportunities to obtain it. I especially appreciated the focus on programs that are working - activities that link youth with high-quality workplace experiences that can make a...
BUSINESS
October 6, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hobson "Hop" Gross, 78, has come to the age where, once in a while, he thinks about death. "Death is going to have to catch me," he said, "and I ain't setting home waiting for it. " More likely, Gross will be where he usually is, at his lab bench at Einstein Medical Center on Broad Street in Philadelphia. "As long as I have my health and strength, I want to keep working," he said. Why change after 55 years? Gross started as an elevator operator at Einstein's southern division in 1959, when the minimum wage was a dollar and a gallon of gas was a quarter.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2007
Employers sliced payrolls by 4,000 in August, the first drop in four years, according to the Labor Department. The decline provided a stark sign that a painful credit crunch that has unnerved Wall Street is putting a strain on the national economy. The snapshot of the jobs climate also showed that the unemployment rate held steady at 4.6 percent, mainly because hundreds of thousands of people left the workforce for any number of reasons. Job losses in construction, manufacturing, transportation and government swamped gains in retail, education and health care, and leisure and hospitality.
NEWS
March 6, 2012
Chester County Hospital and Health System in West Chester trimmed its workforce by 45, or 3 percent, last week "in response to downward pressure on health care revenues across the industry," according to a statement. The hospital, with 218 staffed beds, reported a 1 percent increase in revenue, to $114 million from $112.8 million for the six months ended Dec. 31, according to bond disclosure documents. Over the same period, the hospital's operating profit fell 12.6 percent.
NEWS
June 1, 2010
IN GOOD TIMES or bad, feast or famine, the Daily News editorial board has one everlasting mantra, "Cut city jobs!" They love to use phrases like "Time of Reckoning for ALL of Us. " They speak as if the city work force hasn't budged an inch since we had a shade under 9,000 police officers and about 700 recreation workers in the late '70s. For a newspaper that has spent the last two months plastering their Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalists all over its pages, they apparently missed the white elephant standing in the newsroom.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1988 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Institute for Scientific Information, a publishing company in West Philadelphia, has laid off about 40 employees, about 7 percent of its 600- member workforce, the company said yesterday. Citing a $2.3 million loss last year and an expected loss in 1988, the company also said it would eliminate 50 positions, many of which it said had been vacant for several months. Earlier this month, ISI informed employees that it planned to divest some of its more recent ventures, including The Scientist, a biweekly science newspaper launched two years ago. "We had a couple of bad years" in terms of profitability, said Bob Steck, vice president of administration.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1991 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Faced with a slowdown in orders, Fischer & Porter Co. announced yesterday that it would cut its domestic workforce by about 12 percent, or about 140 people, with most of the reductions to come at the headquarters and manufacturing facility in Warminster, Bucks County. Laurence P. Finnegan Jr., a company spokesman, said the cuts reflected declining orders for the company's industrial control and measurement equipment. Major customers include the pharmaceutical, chemical and petroleum industries.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 22, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid the platitudes, YouthBuild student Bart Williams, who, for the occasion, replaced the construction training program's T-shirt with a pin-striped suit and polka-dotted pocket square, got to the point. "You say you'll help us," said Williams, who is in his early 20s, speaking to U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez and a gallery of state and local politicians at a roundtable discussion Thursday in Camden. "What about scholarships?" he asked. Perez, whose answer is below, was in Camden and Philadelphia "making house calls" and visiting programs to see Labor Department grants at work.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
By all rights, none of this should have happened to Joe Carbone. He was well-educated, and came from a politically connected family, but when he lost his job working for a politician, he sank into his sofa and even more deeply into depression, spending afternoons watching soaps and mornings avoiding neighbors at the supermarket. "If that happened to me, after only eight months out of work, when I had all those things going for me," Carbone said, he could imagine what happened to millions of long-term unemployed who lost jobs during the recession, and still were fruitlessly searching years later.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
From his second-floor window Monday afternoon, Vincent Ean eyed the vacant lot across North 16th Street. Men in suits circled a white tent. Ean snapped a photo with his smartphone and sent it to his fiancee. Last October, they bought their condo in Francisville for $262,500. He works in marketing and telecommutes for a company in New York. Progress in Francisville, he said, is apparent on a week-to-week basis. "It's growing," Ean said. "There are so many other neighborhoods in Philly.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hobson "Hop" Gross, 78, has come to the age where, once in a while, he thinks about death. "Death is going to have to catch me," he said, "and I ain't setting home waiting for it. " More likely, Gross will be where he usually is, at his lab bench at Einstein Medical Center on Broad Street in Philadelphia. "As long as I have my health and strength, I want to keep working," he said. Why change after 55 years? Gross started as an elevator operator at Einstein's southern division in 1959, when the minimum wage was a dollar and a gallon of gas was a quarter.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Glazer , boss at Keystone Property Group , collects aging office buildings, mostly suburban. He says his Bala Cynwyd-based firm now controls north of 10 million square feet, about seven times the size of the new tower Comcast wants to build at 18th and Arch Streets. "It's a big job. But it's a fun job," Glazer told me Wednesday, two days after he agreed to pay $231 million for 12 buildings (2.3 million square feet) in the suburbs of New York. Keystone last year paid $233 million for buildings totaling 1.6 million square feet in Westlakes Office Park in Berwyn, Sentry Park in Blue Bell, and other suburban sites, from the same seller, Mack-Cali Realty Corp.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nadira Hampton has traded the pavement of drug corners for the grass and trees of Pennypack Park. Hampton, 19, who has been in and out of jail for selling drugs for most of her teenage years, is part of a new service and workforce development program that Philadelphia officials announced Monday. PowerCorpsPHL, under the Americorps umbrella, is geared at helping at-risk youths develop environmental work skills and find jobs in the field. The $2.1 million program, which has city and federal funding - $1 million from the Department of Public Safety, $500,000 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and $630,000 in federal funding for community service programs - will place 100 individuals each year in the Parks and Recreation and Water Departments.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
MOUNT AIRY resident Judith Gay, vice president for academic affairs at the Community College of Philadelphia, has been named interim president of the school by its Board of Trustees, the college announced yesterday. The appointment goes into effect Sept. 6. Gay, 63, a Philadelphia native, replaces Stephen M. Curtis, the previous president who was fired last month by the board. "Dr. Gay is a recognized leader in higher education whose strong focus on student success and persistence has helped to increase the number of students earning workforce credentials and associate degrees," said Matt Bergheiser, chair of the Board of Trustees.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the last five months, six middle-age, out-of-work parents have been cramming their brains with information about medical billing, patient privacy, hardware, software, and customer service. If all goes according to plan, they will graduate in May with four industry certifications and a job offer from one of the many Montgomery County companies in need of their newfound skills - NextGen, Teva Pharmaceuticals, SunGard, Unisys, etc. "If I could just get my foot in the door, I feel like I could show off my talents and work my way up," said Stuart Novey, 48, of Ambler.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2012 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Triumph Group Inc. of Berwyn has a market value of $3.2 billion and it generated $3.4 billion in revenue in its most recent fiscal year. Its global workforce numbers about 12,000, and it more than doubled in size in the last two years. Why doesn't this aerospace company appear on the Philly 50 list? I've heard that question - or similar ones involving locally based companies such as Airgas, American Water Works, and others - in the five weeks since the debut of the list of 50 public companies with large workforces in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Tom Ridge
When I was governor, I had the privilege of leading trade missions to explore international opportunities for Pennsylvania companies. I came to know many business leaders personally, and I learned that successful American companies all have something in common: a motivated workforce empowered to deliver results. That's why I'm disappointed that some corporate executives have hastily prejudged a proposed federal rule change that would help make the workforce more inclusive. The proposal is particularly meaningful to me because I proudly chair the National Organization on Disability, which promotes the full participation of America's 54 million people with disabilities in all aspects of life - most notably, employment.
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