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Workplace

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LIVING
March 22, 1994 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leslie C. Shields, author and consultant for black professional women, is scheduled to talk about racism in the workplace during a workshop sponsored by the Delaware Valley Network next weekend at the African-American Historical and Cultural Museum. Shields, raised in Philadelphia, is president of Career Tailors, which provides training programs on such topics as management and career development and diversity in the workplace. She is a member of the faculty at Howard University's School of Business, and co-author, with her sister, Cydney Shields, of an advice book for minority professionals called Work Sister Work: Why Black Women Can't Get Ahead and What They Can Do About It!
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | By Michael Lear-Olimpi, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
A Puerto Rican physicist with an international company enters a conference room for a high-level meeting. An Anglo man already in the room says, "If you're here to move the television, it's over there. " Such confrontations happen often and can easily cause resentments that lead to decreased productivity in a racially and ethnically diversifying U.S. workplace, management consultants say. Avoiding conflict and promoting efficient management will be the focus of the American Management Association's Fourth Annual Black Managers Forum on March 4 at 3 p.m. at Gloucester County College in Sewell.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Some religious groups claim that if guidelines proposed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission are followed, the American workplace could become a "religion-free zone. " They envision a workplace where one could not wear jewelry with a religious motif, set up a Christmas tree, or invite a co-worker to join a church, synagogue or mosque. And a cry has arisen across the land: Say it isn't so, EEOC. No problem. Says EEOC spokesman Michael Widomski: "It isn't so. " The controversy, which continues despite the EEOC's assurances, was stirred when the EEOC decided to issue some general guidelines on the subject of workplace harassment.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Honesty, integrity, camaraderie, loyalty and fun. These are the elements that make up what William Thompson calls "The Spirited Workplace," and the name he has given to a book he's writing, seminars he's about to begin, and hopes to find an outlet for a column. Thompson, a former Baptist minister who used to head his own corporate communications firm, has combined both his theological and secular backgrounds to create his new venture, operating from his home in Drexel Hill.
NEWS
July 20, 1999 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Employees can take college courses without leaving their offices through the new Corporate Campus Program offered by Beaver College in Glenside. The college's full- and part-time faculty will teach the credit and noncredit courses, workshops and seminars at the workplace. The college also will tailor noncredit courses to meet a company's specific needs. Robert Kieserman, coordinator of the program, said the college recently completed an initial mailing to about 200 businesses - manufacturers, service-oriented businesses and companies with at least 100 employees.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 300 representatives of Philadelphia-area unions held a mock funeral yesterday for thousands of laborers killed and injured nationwide by unsafe working conditions. Carmen Bertolino, director of apprentice training for the Painters' District Council 21, said a coffin that was carried around the council headquarters in the 2700 block of Black Lake Place symbolized the workers who died on the job during the last year. "We're just using the casket as a symbolic gesture," said Bertolino, who told the group that young laborers need to be educated about the dangers of the workplace, especially those who work with toxic substances.
LIVING
October 4, 2000 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Along with her purse, briefcase and lunch, Lisa Collins has one other thing that she has to remember to bring to work every day. Her identification badge. "It's a pain in the neck," said Collins, who started wearing the badge last year as director of communications at Americhoice, a Center City insurance company. "You got to have it to walk through different parts of the building. And I have to remember to take it off in the car because it gets caught on the seat belt.
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | By Linda S. Wallace
Words never make or break a woman, but a woman can make or break the words. The only way we can stop name-callers is to take away their power to hurt other people. The same holds true for oppressors and racial chauvinists in the workplace. "Sticks and stones will break my bones, but words can never hurt me," my mother constantly told my siblings and me. Not true, of course. If words can't hurt you, somebody please explain why U.S. corporations are spending millions of dollars to settle lawsuits stemming from ethnic name-calling incidents and adolescent pranks.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1999 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By the numbers, the U.S. workplace is getting safer. Behind the numbers, there are doubts. Serious injuries in private industry have fallen five years in a row, or 21.4 percent, according to government figures. They were slightly more than 1.8 million in 1997. Companies are stressing safety to cut workers' compensation costs and dangerous factory jobs are disappearing. The decline also coincides with the widespread growth in incentive programs that discourage the reporting of injuries.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Does an employer have to post a sign above the company coffee pot, warning about the hazards of too much sugar? How can an employer train a worker who cannot read or understand English to handle hazardous substances in the workplace? Where is a road contractor supposed to post a list of toxic materials when his crew is paving a four-lane, six-mile highway? Those questions and many others arose yesterday when the state Department of Labor and Industry presented its controversial "right-to-know" law to representatives of the state's 214,000 nonmanufacturing firms.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 10, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
The CEO relinquishes power, changes compensation to a "badge" system of rewards for skills, and has "governance" sessions in place of daily meetings. Welcome to the trademarked workplace known as Holacracy. Zappos.com founder Tony Hsieh embraced the Holacracy ethic so deeply that last month the online shoe company executive asked all employees to adopt it, or leave with pay. And 86 percent of Zappos employees stayed. Notable departures included the company's chief technology officer; vice presidents of customer service, human resources, and recruiting; and Alexis Gonzales-Black, who co-led the transition to Holacracy.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lloyd Industries, a Montgomeryville manufacturer of ventilation, duct, and fire-safety products, has been hit with $822,000 in fines by the U.S. Department of Labor for a series of workplace-safety violations. Labor Department officials said Monday that they launched an investigation of the company in November, after an employee lost three fingers operating a metal saw that was not equipped with safety guards. The owner of the company, William Lloyd, was required by law to provide such protection, the Labor Department said.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The most important financial event in your life can be landing a job. And when readers write in saying, "Thanks, but how about helping me find work?" how can I refuse? First place to start the hunt is a supportive environment. That would be the Free Library of Philadelphia, both the central library at 1901 Vine St., just off the Parkway - where a job fair is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 21 on the first floor - and the regional libraries, such as the Paschalville branch, at 6942 Woodland Ave. Then there's the Free Library's year-round career center.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes, Richard J. Cohen says, people are under the mistaken impression that nonprofits don't have to pay as much attention to the bottom line as their for-profit brethren in the corporate world. "One of my core philosophies is that a not-for-profit is a business," said Cohen, 67, chief executive of the Public Health Management Corp., the Philadelphia manager and operator of more than 350 public health programs. "It's just not for profit. "I don't make money from it," he said.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nurse Shauna Trapani's patient was a deadweight - literally - the last time she injured her back at work so badly that she had to miss a day of work. Trapani, 35, had to roll a deceased patient from the emergency room at Crozer-Chester Medical Center, where she works, to the hospital's morgue, a trip that involves pushing a bed up a ramp, around a 90-degree turn, and up another ramp. "It's very physical work, and sometimes you just can't do it," said Trapani, who said she has suffered from work-related back pain for a decade.
NEWS
October 15, 2014
A FEW WORDS come to mind while reflecting on the state porn scandal, which erupted recently when Attorney General Kathleen Kane exposed a ring of state officials exchanging pornographic emails via state computers: Stupid . Maybe "stupid" is not quite right, since these are all relatively high-ranking people, most of whom served under Tom Corbett in the Attorney General's Office. Maybe "arrogant and contemptuous" is better. But "stupid" does cover the notion of anyone working in the 21st century who doesn't understand - or remember - that workplace computers are not private and should not be used for questionable personal reasons.
FOOD
June 6, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
What better way to reach people with the "eat fresh and local" message than to go where they work, study, commute, or pray? Neighborhood squares, parks and parking lots still host many farmer's markets in the region, but more and more are operating out of workplaces, universities, transportation hubs, and places of worship. This spring, new markets are coming to Drexel University, the U.S. General Services Administration offices in Center City, two neighborhood churches, and Congregation Rodeph Shalom, the synagogue on North Broad Street.
NEWS
May 21, 2014
I'VE BEEN THINKING about the advice I would give to this year's graduates. You might expect me to tell them about the importance of saving or the need to take advantage of any workplace retirement plan. I could also urge them to pay off their credit cards every month, and try to stay as debt-free as possible. But this year, I want to talk about advice that's not just about money. I call it the ABCs of workplace success: Avoid gossip, be on time and challenge yourself to be content.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | BY DONELSON R. FORSYTH
A MODERN mania is about to descend upon us: March Madness. Sixty-eight colleges and universities will send their basketball teams into a tournament that will end with one team recognized as national champion. And the other 67? All fails, but not major fails: This tournament is such a big deal that just qualifying gets you bragging rights. People will watch, which is fine, unless they are supposed to be doing something else - driving trains, directing traffic, wiring a GFI circuit, proofing a million-dollar contract or running those budget numbers for the coming staff meeting.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
DOWNINGTOWN The warning signs surfaced on the way to a science seminar. A group of Downingtown S.T.E.M. Academy students attending a conference at West Chester University had stellar grades, specialized curriculum, and technology know-how. Their biggest challenge turned out being how to interact with the school district superintendent who came with them. "They didn't have the natural reflex to just put out a hand, shake, and smile," said Anna Jordan, an informational specialist at the school.
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