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Workplace Safety

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NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
United Hospital Supply Corp., a family-run Burlington, N.J., company that makes and designs metal cabinets and furniture for laboratories and offices, faces a proposed fine of $181,500 for 21 worker health and safety violations - most of them serious and repeat violations - the U.S. Labor Department's Occupational and Safety and Health Administration said Monday. "The willful and repeat violations cited during these latest inspections were identified in 2010 at United Health Supply Corp.'s facility," Paula Dixon-Roderick, OSHA's area director in Marlton, said in a statement.
NEWS
January 28, 1999 | By Meredith Fischer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
State officials are questioning the validity of a workplace safety committee that the township founded two years ago to reduce its workers' compensation premiums. "We are not making any judgments, but an administrative review has been ordered," said John Currie, spokesman for the state Department of Labor and Industry. At issue is whether the Marple Township committee held monthly meetings last year and whether minutes were kept. Both are expressly required by the state's Health and Safety Committee program, in which the township participates.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | By Chani Katzen, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
State officials have revoked their certification of the township's workplace safety committee, a panel founded two years ago to reduce the town's workers' compensation premiums. "This is the first time this has ever happened, and we oversee 3,710 committees statewide," said John Currie, spokesman for the state Department of Labor and Industry. "They just didn't meet our criteria. " In a letter sent to Township Manager Joseph Flicker last week, the state said an April audit found that instead of the required monthly meetings, the township held only four in 1998.
NEWS
March 22, 1999 | By Meredith Fischer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
State officials have ordered an audit of all documents relating to Marple Township's workplace safety committee, which came under scrutiny this year. The audit will be conducted April 20 at the township administrative offices. In question is whether the committee held monthly meetings last year and whether minutes were kept. Both are required by the state's Health and Safety Committee program, in which the township participates. "We take these committees seriously," said John Currie, spokesman for the state Department of Labor and Industry.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
AS A deaf employee, Michael MacDonald can do his work as a package handler at the United Parcel Service facility at Philadelphia International Airport without assistance. But when it comes to employee meetings and to understanding certain things - such as safety and emergency procedures, company policies and procedures, and some other workplace communications - he needs an American Sign Language interpreter. Federal law - the Americans with Disabilities Act - "requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations to otherwise qualified individuals with disabilities so that they can enjoy equal employment opportunities and participate fully in the workplace," said Julie Foster, an attorney at the Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia, which filed a lawsuit on MacDonald's behalf.
NEWS
May 16, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Pennsylvania state representative grilled a senior Rohm & Haas Co. executive during a House committee hearing yesterday, accusing the chemical company of not doing enough to determine the cause of more than 15 brain tumors suffered by current and former employees. Rep. Michael P. McGeehan (D., Phila.) cited a December report by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, which accused the company of taking a "scattershot approach" in tallying the tumor cases, among other faults.
NEWS
January 3, 2002
FLUSH WITH his high approval ratings following the Gulf War, George Bush senior allowed his domestic agenda to go to pot, leaving the economy to sink . . . along with his re-election possibilities. Is his son following in his footsteps? For a man obsessed with avoiding his father's mistakes, President George W. Bush seems - like a Greek tragedy - fated to make them all over again. There is only so much cover a war on terrorism can give a lousy domestic policy agenda. For example: Last week, when people were busy sweeping up shredded Christmas paper and empty toy boxes, Bush the younger eliminated Clinton-era regulations that would have barred companies that violate environmental and workplace safety standards from getting fat government contracts.
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Representatives from local unions picketed U.S. Rep. James Greenwood's office yesterday to protest his support of a bill targeting the Occupational Safety and Health Administration for big cuts. "We consider this bill a death warrant for American workers," said Jim Moran, director of Philaposh, a Philadelphia agency that lobbies for better workplace safety. Moran and about 50 others walked a picket line around a wooden coffin in front of the Republican congressman's Doylestown office, chanting "Dump Greenwood.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
SON OF A GUN - COPS CATCH SMALLEST OF THE SMALL FRIES Two hours after SWAT teams converged on his Vancouver home, Zack gave himself up. But the little tough guy refused to give up his gun. "You can't take my gun," said the 3-year-old, grabbing the toy pistol that police had found in their search of the family car. The stakeout had begun when Zack pointed his toy gun at his father as they pulled up to their home Thursday morning....
SPORTS
April 10, 2013 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for the NFL urged a federal judge in Philadelphia on Tuesday to dismiss hundreds of lawsuits by former professional football players, contending players' claims that the league hid the risks of concussions belong before a labor arbitrator, not in civil court. "This case is at bottom a case about workplace safety in an industry where issues about workplace safety were addressed in collective bargaining agreements" negotiated by the players union and clubs, Paul Clement, a former U.S. Solicitor General who is representing the league, told U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Outside a West Virginia courthouse, the families of the dead waited for Don Blankenship, the former chief executive of Massey Energy Inc., about to be sentenced for a mining disaster that killed 29 miners at Massey's Upper Big Branch mine in Montcoal, W. Va. "I miss my son, my brother, my nephew!" shouted one man as camera crews captured the moment at the federal courthouse in Charleston on Wednesday. "How come you never came to apologize to me?" Every day 12 people - sons and brothers, mothers, and daughters - die on the job because of hazardous conditions, but rarely do their employers face serious jail time, or anything more than a misdemeanor charge.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
AS A deaf employee, Michael MacDonald can do his work as a package handler at the United Parcel Service facility at Philadelphia International Airport without assistance. But when it comes to employee meetings and to understanding certain things - such as safety and emergency procedures, company policies and procedures, and some other workplace communications - he needs an American Sign Language interpreter. Federal law - the Americans with Disabilities Act - "requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations to otherwise qualified individuals with disabilities so that they can enjoy equal employment opportunities and participate fully in the workplace," said Julie Foster, an attorney at the Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia, which filed a lawsuit on MacDonald's behalf.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
United Hospital Supply Corp., a family-run Burlington, N.J., company that makes and designs metal cabinets and furniture for laboratories and offices, faces a proposed fine of $181,500 for 21 worker health and safety violations - most of them serious and repeat violations - the U.S. Labor Department's Occupational and Safety and Health Administration said Monday. "The willful and repeat violations cited during these latest inspections were identified in 2010 at United Health Supply Corp.'s facility," Paula Dixon-Roderick, OSHA's area director in Marlton, said in a statement.
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NFL's dispute with retired players over the risks and impact of concussions unfolded Tuesday in Philadelphia on two distinct, but perhaps equally important, battlegrounds. The first was a seventh-floor courtroom at the federal courthouse, where lawyers for the league and players sparred over if, when, and how the NFL bears responsibility for head trauma that players may have suffered during years of violent collisions. The second emerged in a hotel conference room several blocks away.
SPORTS
April 10, 2013 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for the NFL urged a federal judge in Philadelphia on Tuesday to dismiss hundreds of lawsuits by former professional football players, contending players' claims that the league hid the risks of concussions belong before a labor arbitrator, not in civil court. "This case is at bottom a case about workplace safety in an industry where issues about workplace safety were addressed in collective bargaining agreements" negotiated by the players union and clubs, Paul Clement, a former U.S. Solicitor General who is representing the league, told U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The medical examiner said the fatal fall earlier today of a Franklinville man at an industrial real estate park in Camden was an accident. The 50-year-old victim, whose identify was not released, was cleaning the roof of a building in the roughly 80-acre complex on the 2200 block of Mount Ephraim Avenue when he fell through the roof shortly before 8:30 a.m., the Camden County Prosecutor's Office said. The victim died of multiple injuries at the scene, authorities said. He was employed by Harris Camden Realty, which owns the complex, said company vice-president Thomas Harris III. Harris said the victim was cleaning the flat roof at ReCommunity Recycling, which leases space in the complex, when he fell about four stories.
NEWS
May 22, 2008
No one in Congress can match Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's record of championing causes for middle- and working-class people. From health care to civil rights to workplace safety, Kennedy has been Washington's most effective advocate for the little guy. In almost a half-century of public service, about a quarter of the 2,500 bills he sponsored are law. It is too soon to write a final tribute to Kennedy, 76, who has a malignant brain tumor....
NEWS
May 16, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Pennsylvania state representative grilled a senior Rohm & Haas Co. executive during a House committee hearing yesterday, accusing the chemical company of not doing enough to determine the cause of more than 15 brain tumors suffered by current and former employees. Rep. Michael P. McGeehan (D., Phila.) cited a December report by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, which accused the company of taking a "scattershot approach" in tallying the tumor cases, among other faults.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2003 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four minutes after Alfie Coxe clocked into work three years ago, "he was run over, crushed and killed by a forklift. " The next time his wife said she saw him, he was lying on a steel table in a hospital. "When I reached for his hand and he didn't squeeze back, I knew it was real," she said. Yesterday, one by one, workers tossed red carnations into the Delaware River, one for each of the 74 people killed on the job in Pennsylvania and New Jersey last year. During the ceremony, a solitary bagpiper played as tourists watched in silence.
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