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NEWS
July 11, 1990 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
Everybody loves a short workweek. Everybody except George Geist. Geist, the chairman of the Camden County Republican Party, says he was outraged when Gloucester Township employees worked only two days last week prior to the Independence Day holiday. The township offices are normally closed Fridays, and when township employees also received Thursday off, that made three straight days off. "She (Township Mayor Ann Mullen) did the ultimate when she closed the government for three days," said Geist, a Gloucester Township resident.
NEWS
December 11, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The morning fog defied predictions it was likely to lift by 10 a.m., remaining dense even in Center City more than 40 minutes later. Visibility, though, which was only a quarter-mile as of 8 a.m., had improved at half-mile at Philadelphia International Airport, which saw some morning delays. (To check a flight, go to www.phl.org .) A bunch of rush-hour accidents - nine was the count around 8 a.m. - gave way to just a couple around the area nearly three hours later, according to traffic.com.
LIVING
September 24, 2008 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adriane Livers makes sure her boss has as close to a glitch-free work life as humanly possible. Each week, the administrative coordinator keeps the boss' schedule, screens calls and e-mails, books speaking engagements, travels to client sites, and manages a deskload of other responsibilities. On Tuesdays, however, her duties are markedly different: Livers, 40, might sort through personal mail, pay household bills, visit the post office or bank. Often by midday, she gets an early start on dinner.
LIVING
August 22, 1995 | By Sewell Chan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Angela R. Walker works odd hours - and she likes them. In fact, she asked for them. A tax examiner at the IRS processing center in Northeast Philadelphia, she checks individual tax returns from 6:30 a.m. until 4 p.m., five days a week. The next week, Walker works those hours on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. She then works 8 1/2 hours on Thursday, and takes Friday off. The following Monday, the cycle begins again. The West Philadelphia resident opted for her current schedule about five years ago. "I chose it at the time because my children were very young and I needed the day off to take care of my personal needs: seeing a doctor or dentist, taking the kids to school and even getting a break for myself," she said.
NEWS
November 4, 1994 | For The Inquirer / ELIZABETH V. ROBERTSON
As shadows lengthen, Dee and William Metz of Northeast Philadelphia leave the Ocean City Music Pier. The Metzes were taking a break from working on their Shore home. For work or play, the weather was on their side: The warm, sunny days are expected to continue through the weekend. Real November weather will return with the workweek.
NEWS
March 10, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
DEEP IN THE HEART OF MENSA LIES YEN FOR THE COWBOY LIFE Cowtown's I.Q. level may be getting a little boost. Fort Worth, the plainer sibling of brassy Dallas, says that Mensa, the organization whose members are among the most intelligent in the world, has chosen it over Kansas City and Dallas for its national headquarters. American Mensa Ltd., the U.S. arm of the high I.Q. group, will be relocating from Brooklyn, N.Y. Proud of its Cowtown moniker, Fort Worth has historically been a hub for cattlers and still retains its stockyards, filled now with little stores and restaurants.
NEWS
June 18, 2008 | By Angela Couloumbis, Matt Katz and Nick Pipitone INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
By the end of this month, the government in Gloucester Township in New Jersey will turn out the lights on Fridays - literally. And in Berks County, Pa., a number of office cubicles could soon go dark one day a week. All across the country, municipal and state governments are scrambling for solutions to their ballooning energy bills, and are considering everything from changing to energy-efficient lightbulbs to cutting the traditional five-day workweek. As early as tomorrow, Berks County commissioners could consider whether to put some departments on a four-day workweek, following the lead of several local governments across the nation that have done so to save commuters and taxpayers money.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
My company is considering putting us on a four-day workweek. It sounds good, but I'd like to know if there's a negative side to it. Just reconfigure those 40 hours and you'll end up with 10-hour days and three-day weekends. Sounds great, but the compressed workweek, as it is sometimes called, has pros and cons. "There are some who believe it increases stress (because of) longer days, and you really don't see the kids at all during the week. There are others who swear by it, think the three-day weekend allows them to become refreshed, and provides a relief valve for stress," said Dana Friedman, co-president of the Families and Work Institute, a New York-based national information clearinghouse for issues affecting work and family.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2010 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Economic conditions for Philadelphia-area manufacturers weakened significantly in the first half of August, a widely watched survey by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia said Thursday. The survey, along with a disappointing jobs report, sent stock market indicators lower throughout the day. After two months of slowing, the broadest index in the Business Outlook Survey fell to minus 7.7 for August, from plus 5.1 in early July. Readings less than zero signal contraction, and the numbers mark a period of declining monthly activity for the first time since July 2009, the Philly Fed said.
NEWS
June 4, 2003
Oh for the hurricane, the funnel cloud, the blizzard, the flood. Even those meteorological menaces would be better than this. At least dramatic weather excites us, lets us leap courageously into survivor mode - salt stacked higher than a pillar, windows taped, carpets lifted, cellars hatcheted, shelves bulging with bread and milk. But this sodden gray, this unrelenting damp mundanity that douseth the spirit as doth the fall of the first leaf. It inspireth only painfully fake Shakespearean phrases.
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NEWS
December 11, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The morning fog defied predictions it was likely to lift by 10 a.m., remaining dense even in Center City more than 40 minutes later. Visibility, though, which was only a quarter-mile as of 8 a.m., had improved at half-mile at Philadelphia International Airport, which saw some morning delays. (To check a flight, go to www.phl.org .) A bunch of rush-hour accidents - nine was the count around 8 a.m. - gave way to just a couple around the area nearly three hours later, according to traffic.com.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Peter Mucha and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Expect below-normal temperatures and threats of showers and thunderstorms through Thursday evening, following bit of a warm-up under mostly sunny skies through the weekend. More than three-quarters of an inch of rain fell overnight at Philadelphia International Airport, and another half-inch could fall today, with showers likely and thunderstorms possible through late afternoon, according to the National Weather Service. Rain is possible but less likely this evening. Showers are also in the forecast for Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, with more afternoon thunderstorms possible.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2010 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Economic conditions for Philadelphia-area manufacturers weakened significantly in the first half of August, a widely watched survey by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia said Thursday. The survey, along with a disappointing jobs report, sent stock market indicators lower throughout the day. After two months of slowing, the broadest index in the Business Outlook Survey fell to minus 7.7 for August, from plus 5.1 in early July. Readings less than zero signal contraction, and the numbers mark a period of declining monthly activity for the first time since July 2009, the Philly Fed said.
LIVING
September 24, 2008 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adriane Livers makes sure her boss has as close to a glitch-free work life as humanly possible. Each week, the administrative coordinator keeps the boss' schedule, screens calls and e-mails, books speaking engagements, travels to client sites, and manages a deskload of other responsibilities. On Tuesdays, however, her duties are markedly different: Livers, 40, might sort through personal mail, pay household bills, visit the post office or bank. Often by midday, she gets an early start on dinner.
NEWS
August 27, 2008
Y ou are commuting to work to begin the week. It is early in the morning, and the traffic is awful. Even though the driver's seat of your luxury SUV is quite comfortable, you are not quite comfortable because of a throbbing in your lower lumbar region, an ominous clicking in your left elbow, and a welter of still-bloody scrapes on several parts of your body. The ones that aren't bandaged are adhering to the leather upholstery. Mental note: Get the car detailed soon. All in all, things are better than yesterday, though.
NEWS
June 18, 2008 | By Angela Couloumbis, Matt Katz and Nick Pipitone INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
By the end of this month, the government in Gloucester Township in New Jersey will turn out the lights on Fridays - literally. And in Berks County, Pa., a number of office cubicles could soon go dark one day a week. All across the country, municipal and state governments are scrambling for solutions to their ballooning energy bills, and are considering everything from changing to energy-efficient lightbulbs to cutting the traditional five-day workweek. As early as tomorrow, Berks County commissioners could consider whether to put some departments on a four-day workweek, following the lead of several local governments across the nation that have done so to save commuters and taxpayers money.
NEWS
December 11, 2006
Only in Congress could the prospect of a five-day workweek cause such grumbling and whining. Incoming Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D., Md.) just delivered the bad news to fellow lawmakers. Starting Jan. 4, Hoyer said, the House will be in session five days a week. Votes will be held on Monday nights, and lawmakers won't be able to leave Washington until Friday. To hear the reaction, you would think Hoyer was proposing 18-hour shifts in the coal mines. Among those muttering in protest was Rep. Jack Kingston (R., Ga.)
NEWS
June 4, 2003
Oh for the hurricane, the funnel cloud, the blizzard, the flood. Even those meteorological menaces would be better than this. At least dramatic weather excites us, lets us leap courageously into survivor mode - salt stacked higher than a pillar, windows taped, carpets lifted, cellars hatcheted, shelves bulging with bread and milk. But this sodden gray, this unrelenting damp mundanity that douseth the spirit as doth the fall of the first leaf. It inspireth only painfully fake Shakespearean phrases.
NEWS
June 21, 2002 | By Jere Downs INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Does it seem as if you spend forever stuck in rush hour traffic? According to a study released yesterday, Philadelphia-area motorists spend at least a workweek - about 42 hours a year - on the road to nowhere. But as you fume behind the wheel in rush hour traffic, take heart that others elsewhere are wasting far more time. Of 75 regions studied by the Texas Transportation Institute, the Philadelphia area ranked 34th. In Los Angeles, the nation's No. 1 stomach-churning traffic spot, the average motorist frittered away 136 hours in 2000, the latest year studied.
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