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World Aids Day

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NEWS
December 1, 1992 | By Peter Finn, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Red ribbons, a symbol of compassion for those who have AIDS and solidarity with the struggle to conquer the disease, will grace the lapels of area residents today as South Jersey marks World AIDS Day. At noon, at Camden City Hall, the Camden County AIDS Task Force will sponsor a rally to raise awareness about the disease. Participants will hand out red ribbons and literature as people with AIDS offer personal testimony about their illness. Local political leaders also will speak.
NEWS
November 22, 2001 | By Ericka Bennett INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With World AIDS Day just around the corner, local organizations said they are hoping that activities they have planned will help put the disease back into public consciousness. World AIDS Day - Dec. 1 - began in 1988 after the World Summit of Ministers of Health Programs for AIDS Prevention. The day was designated to heighten awareness and open channels of communication about HIV and AIDS. On and around Dec. 1, dinners, seminars and candlelight vigils are planned across the region to not only help raise awareness, but to raise money for research and services for those infected with the diseases.
NEWS
November 30, 2001 | By Lewis Whittington
World AIDS day is tomorrow. In the past few years, this observance has turned from its initial purpose of sociopolitical activism in the service of public awareness into a toothless event with all the significance of a Hallmark holiday. It has moved from marches in the streets and grassroots initiatives into fund-raiser's pabulum. Now, with the reorganized priorities post-Sept. 11, scientists, researchers, AIDS organizations, health workers, and social service organizations are facing another turning point in the epidemic.
NEWS
December 11, 2011
Bob Ray Sanders is a columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram World AIDS Day, Dec. 1, was truly remarkable this year for several reasons - mostly good, but at least one bad thing. It was the day George W. Bush returned to Africa, a continent that benefited greatly from his unprecedented HIV/AIDS initiative; President Obama committed to a major increase in funding for treatment of HIV here at home. That's the good news. Also on that day, in a bizarre act that had nothing to do with HIV/AIDS, the world's largest human-rights organization made a complete fool of itself by calling for Bush's arrest.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
More than 100 arts and AIDS service organiations in Philadelphia will observe World AIDS Day tomorrow with a variety of programs. It will be the first city-wide "Day Without Art" since 1989, when arts organizations around the country began to recognize Dec. 1 as a day of mourning and a way of dramatizing how the disease has affected the arts. Many commercial and nonprofit art galleries will close tomorrow, so if you're planning to see a particular exhibition, you should call first.
NEWS
November 30, 2003 | By Jack Smith
A month after winning her first beauty pageant, Kalelelo Ntsepe, 32, is still a little overwhelmed. "I entered because I wanted to make a difference," she says. That may sound like conventional beauty queen banter, but the pageant - held in Botswana, on the southern fringe of Africa's Kalahari Desert - was anything but ordinary. To enter, contestants had to be HIV-positive. "The competition was held to fight the stigma of HIV and AIDS," says Ntsepe. "As Miss HIV Stigma-Free, my goal is to show that a woman can have the virus and still lead an active, vital, productive life.
NEWS
December 2, 1991 | By Terence Samuel, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this article
Under the gleaming Christmas tree atop the steps of the Art Museum, they came to remember the dead. It was an odd juxtaposition. About 50 people, standing in a circle at twilight yesterday, carrying burning candles, thinking and talking not about joy or celebration, but about suffering and loss and death. It was World AIDS Day, and in Philadelphia, around the country and around the world, AIDS activists came together to mourn those who have died of the disease, and plead the case of those still living with it. Observances included everything from A Day Without Art to a Night Without Light, and the commemorations were as varied as the people doing the remembering.
NEWS
December 2, 1993 | Daily News wire services
President Clinton, the first U.S. leader to participate in World AIDS Day, touted his administration's record yesterday and welcomed the rage of an AIDS activist who angrily accused him of doing nothing. "Part of my job is to be a lightning rod," Clinton said during a speech at Georgetown Medical Center. He listened calmly to the heckler who interrupted his speech, shouting "one year, lots of talk, no action. " Clinton said, "I'd rather that man be in here screaming at me than having given up altogether.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The first World AIDS Day was marked yesterday by a concert in Beijing, a march in Harare, Zimbabwe, and a speech by a San Franciscan who has had the deadly disease for six years and says his life was "made richer" because of it. The World Health Organization, which sponsored the event, said 140 nations held special activities yesterday to focus awareness on the disease that WHO estimates infects 5 million to 10 million people worldwide. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control estimated Monday that 79,389 Americans had been diagnosed with AIDS since 1981; more than half have died.
NEWS
December 1, 1996
The theme of today's ninth World AIDS Day, "One World, One Hope," has been given new meaning by a promising class of drugs that is extending lives of people with the fatal disease. Any progress in treating victims of this modern plague is good news. But euphoria over new treatments should not overshadow the most effective and proven weapon in the fight against AIDS: education to prevent people from getting it in the first place. The word has to be spread, in the classroom and on the street, that even with a cure for AIDS on some distant horizon, this is still a horrible, deadly, preventable disease.
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NEWS
December 4, 2015
ISSUE | EQUALITY Signs of change Sunday's article noting the imbalance of gender representation in Pennsylvania government ("Struggle for political equity persists") closely aligns with the work of the Women Donors Network's Reflective Democracy Campaign. In groundbreaking research on the race and gender of elected officials and candidates from the federal to the county level, we asked, "Who leads us?" and "Who runs (in) America?" The answer was: white men. With just 31 percent of the population, white men make up 65 percent of elected officials and 66 percent of candidates.
NEWS
December 2, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
Today is being marketed as a global day of giving. Coffee drinkers and donors to a local nonprofit can enter to win a bike ride or a lunch with the mayor and his wife. Here's how it works: Gearing Up  is a local nonprofit that provides bikes for women in transition from addiction, abuse and incarceration, and it's announced a partnership with Square One Coffee (249 S. 13th St.), in Midtown Village, for what's being designated as #GivingTuesday. According to a news release, the coffee shop will give 5 percent of all sales earned today to Gearing Up, and for one day only, every donation made at Square One Coffee or through the Gearing Up website will be matched dollar for dollar, up to $10,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
Saturday marked the 20th anniversary of National HIV Testing Day, an annual observance dedicated to promoting more frequent HIV testing and raising awareness of the deadly disease that affects 1.2 million people in the U.S. alone. Sheryl Lee Ralph , wife of state Sen. Vincent Hughes , is not only an acclaimed actress and best-selling author, but she's also founder of the Divinely Inspired Victoriously Aware Foundation (DIVA), which aims to raise AIDS awareness. Her foundation is intended to serve as a living memorial to the friends she has lost to HIV/AIDS, and makes a goal of erasing the stigma attached to it, as well as lowering the HIV infection rate in general.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A patient alleges in a lawsuit filed Monday in federal court in Philadelphia that a medical practice co-owned by Lancaster County's coroner discriminated against him and his family because he has HIV. The plaintiffs - identified as the patient, using the pseudonym Husband Jones, and his wife and daughter - say that after four previous visits, the patient returned Oct. 8, 2013, to Stephen G. Diamantoni M.D. & Associates Family Practice's Quarryville office...
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In March 2002, after hearing rumors that her partner was infected with HIV, Nancy Santiago got tested. When the results came back, her doctor gave her a hug and a referral to care. "Ten years later, I'm still here" - she didn't even need antiretrovirals until four years ago - "and I have a lot to do in the future," said the mother of five and grandmother of 10 from North Philadelphia. Santiago, 54, spoke Friday at a City Hall news conference, one of scores around the globe highlighting various challenges - hers involved the Latino community - on the occasion of World AIDS Day on Saturday.
NEWS
December 11, 2011
Bob Ray Sanders is a columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram World AIDS Day, Dec. 1, was truly remarkable this year for several reasons - mostly good, but at least one bad thing. It was the day George W. Bush returned to Africa, a continent that benefited greatly from his unprecedented HIV/AIDS initiative; President Obama committed to a major increase in funding for treatment of HIV here at home. That's the good news. Also on that day, in a bizarre act that had nothing to do with HIV/AIDS, the world's largest human-rights organization made a complete fool of itself by calling for Bush's arrest.
NEWS
December 1, 2010
Two million people still die annually from HIV, a sobering thought as another World AIDS Day is observed. Events will be held around the globe Wednesday in the campaign to raise awareness about HIV/AIDS, and remember the millions who have died from the disease. The observances offer an opportunity to mark gains in the battle to conquer the epidemic by preventing its spread and to push for renewed efforts to find a cure. The United Nations estimates that 2.6 million people were newly infected with AIDS in 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2010 | By Dan Gross
GOV. RENDELL lured U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter to the Prime Rib (17th & Locust) last night where a group of old friends surprised the outgoing senator with a dinner party to celebrate his 30 years on Capitol Hill. Appeals Court Judge Midge Rendell , Comcast CEO Brian Roberts and VP David L. Cohen , incoming U.S. Rep. Pat Meehan , electricians union Local 98 leader John Dougherty , attorney Dick Sprague , political consultant Charles Breslin , radio host and Daily News columnist Michael Smerconish and attorney Steve Harmelin were among guests celebrating with Specter and the senator's wife Joan , a former city councilwoman, and their lawyer son, Shanin . "Married!
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