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World Cinema

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NEWS
May 7, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Fergus is a musician who journeys south to "The Smoke" (Northern England's disdainful nickname for London) to try to find the woman he jilted years before. Standing on the balcony of a London apartment in Born Romantic, Fergus simply bellows her name into the night. As a method for finding a needle in a haystack it may be crazy, but the most amusing observation of David Kane's droll comedy is that Fergus' howls for his erstwhile love have as much chance of landing the right partner as any other gambit.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1996 | This report contains information from the Associated Press, Reuters, and Inquirer music critic Tom Moon
The fifth annual Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema wrapped last night after 12 days - that's 56 feature films and 44 shorts from 37 countries. This year, festival-goers could rate the films from 1 to 10 on ballots given out at each screening (average score, 7.9). The top seven Philly faves were The African Child (France/Guinea), written and directed by Laurent Chevallier, making its U.S. premiere; The Garden (Slovakia/France), another U.S. premiere, co-written and directed by Martin Sulik; Kimia (Iran)
LIVING
May 9, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Sometimes less is less. The leaner Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema, which ended its ninth annual run on Sunday, sold 17,000 tickets, its organizers reported yesterday - down 28 percent from last year's all-time high of 23,700. PFWC officials such as Ellen Davis, president of the festival's parent organization, International House, anticipated that downsizing the 10-day event from 140 films in 1999 to 100 this year would mean a downsized audience. But they were confident that the quality of the offerings was undiminished.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
As it turned out, the screenwriting competition sponsored by the Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema turned out to be no place for amateurs. The festival's judging committee picked two winners Wednesday (a dead heat, the judges insist) from more than 100 entries, both authored by writers whose work has already been converted into feature films. The committee named Ridley-raised writer Bruce Graham co-winner for "Reilly's Last Request," the story of a South Philadelphia tavern owner who reluctantly takes over funeral arrangements for a barfly who dies in his establishment.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Forty-nine new features. Seventeen shorts. An additional 16 independent short-form films and videos from area media artists. A program of Internet-specific "Streaming Cinema. " A spotlight of seven titles - including two Philadelphia premieres, Jean-Luc Godard's Contempt, Gregg Araki's The Living End, and the French pic Wild Reeds - from the innovative indie distributor Strand Releasing. Welcome to the ninth annual Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema. The festival - which began last night with the premiere of Alison Maclean's druggy hegira, Jesus' Son, and continues through May 7, with Jim McKay's Crown Heights coming-of-ager, Our Song - brings together work from 29 countries.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Frank Cardon shoots people. Not long ago, the hatred, rage and fear that made him who he was allowed him to shoot indiscriminately, with no regard for the lives of those on the receiving end of his weapon of choice. But things are different now. Cardon still shoots people. But in a move that may have saved his very life, he traded his gun for a video camera and has since realized a kind of power that a gat could never provide. Cardon tells his story - unflinchingly, and in his own words - in "Teen Dreams," a 70-minute docu-diary which will be presented at International House, 3701 Chestnut St., as part of the fourth annual Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1992 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Come May 6, after six years during which business rivals became cooperative partners, the city will at last have its Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema. An event so sweeping that it will take at least two museums, the Free Library, three theater chains and two other cultural venues to house, the 12- day, 40-film fete will range from commercial to avant-garde, revival to premiere. The festival, expected to attract an audience of 15,000, is planned as an annual affair that, its organizers hope, will one day equal Toronto's Festival of Festivals in critical and popular status.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
With the possible exception of "management consultant," no job title is quite so vague as "film producer. " In some cases, the producer is the exec who oversees a picture; in others, the moneybags who personally finances it. Then there's the seat-of-the-pants type who ropes in every element, from cash to cast to cinematographer. This kind of producer sweet-talks investors, finds the perfect decrepit Victorian to use as a location and knows just the right actress. This kind of producer is to Hollywood what the promoter is to boxing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1993 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"We have to nail down the FOGs. " "Are we happy with Afrique at FLOP"? "There's an A and a B print, but only the A has the elevator. " International House, the concrete home-away-from-home for West Philadelphia's contingent of overseas students, is a place accustomed to the exotic chatter of foreign languages. But even an ace linguist would be hard- pressed to make sense of the shorthand ricocheting around the cramped second-floor quarters of the Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema (PFWC)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1993 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There will be no Bermuda shorts. But when the 12-day 1993 Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema gets underway May 5, there will be Brazilian Shorts. Not to mention programs of gay and lesbian shorts, women's shorts and children's shorts. And then there's the 41 feature-length films and videos, ranging from vintage Hitchcock to the world premiere of Girls High alumna Ayoka Chenzira's Alma's Rainbow. From Alan Rudolph's Equinox - a rumination on duplicity starring Matthew Modine and Lara Flynn Boyle - to Hard Boiled, the latest balletic bloodbath from Hong Kong action auteur John Woo. The sophomore run of the movie and video festival, which opens with the gala Philadelphia premiere of Mike Newell's Irish fantasy Into the West and closes May 16 with the U.S. premiere of Colin Nutley's Swedish culture-clash comedy House of Angels, is an ambitious program that is truly global in scope.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 16, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
I have the best job in the world. I work with the smartest, most supportive colleagues you can imagine. So it is hard, very hard, to leave a place that pays me to see movies such as Jerry Maguire; Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon ; and The Social Network . Harder still to leave coworkers who are the most intellectually and emotionally engaged individuals I've ever met - and human thesauruses to boot. With mixed emotions, I am leaving fulltime film criticism in order to pursue longer-form writing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The "world" may be gone, but the world has not been forgotten. The newly monikered Philadelphia Film Festival, known in its previous 11 years as the Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema is, if anything, more global than ever. From the antipodes to Iceland, from Tokyo to Tunisia, from a Nevada brothel to a Nashville prison, the 300-plus films scheduled to be shown over the next 13 days represent an ambitious lineup of features, shorts, documentaries, animation and experimental cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Wallow. Sulk. Go with it. In these light-deprived first days of the new year (you've already broken those resolutions, haven't you?), there's no point in trying to be cheery. Instead, feed those seasonal affective disorder blues with the glimmer of a TV screen - or a movie theater, if you can summon the energy to leave the abode. Sate that melancholia with a few truly depressing pics in which unhappy people tread bleak terrain, driving down the desperate roads of their sorry existence.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2002 | By HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services, The Hollywood Reporter and Billboard.com contributed to this report
START LINING up for tickets. In a move that makes shocking sense for the movie business, red-hot director David Fincher ("Seven," "Fight Club" and most recently "Panic Room") is on the verge of inking a contract to helm "Mission: Impossible 3. " The visually flashy director will join Brian De Palma and John Woo in the smashingly successful "M:I" franchise, the first installment of which grossed $180.9 million domestically, and the sequel $215.4 million. Oh, and Tom Cruise will reprise his role of Ethan Hunt.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
John Sayles walks with a cowboy lope and around Hollywood is known as a hired gun paid munificently to script-doctor blockbusters such as Apollo 13 and The Mummy. Around these parts, though, the Hoboken filmmaker is highly regarded as a maverick who was indie before indie was cool. Using studio paychecks to finance movies the majors would never touch, the unpretentious storyteller consistently spins shoestring productions such as Return of the Secaucus 7 (made for $60,000 in 1980)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
First, the numbers: 157 features, 19 documentaries, 69 shorts, 49 countries. Quantitatively, the 11th Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema is the biggest ever. The projectors began rolling last night with Strut!, Max Raab's satisfying cheesesteak of a celebration of Philadelphia's plumed paraders, the Mummers (the prize-winning doc will screen again tomorrow at the Prince Music Theater). And the projectors will continue to roll through April 18: two weeks of movie madness, tributes to stars and filmmakers, brunches, parties, panels and roundtables (screenwriting!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
An American maverick, an English fantasist, the New York woman who redefined women on screen, and the London man who renewed movie realism on both sides of the Atlantic will be honored by the Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema this year. John Sayles, who has made 14 of his 15 features - most notably Lone Star and Return of the Secaucus 7 - entirely outside Hollywood, will be on hand Tuesday to receive the American Independents Award. Four of his films will be shown in the festival, including Secaucus 7 (1980)
NEWS
April 3, 2002 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Bawdy religious satire. Rapturous classical music. Excessive altered reality. Bloody gothic kitsch. Nuns, moms and inflatable dolls reveling in sexual glee. Some say such cinematic obsessions signal a troubled mind. But British director-screenwriter Ken Russell says his visions are leaps of a powerful imagination. In any case, Russell and his work will be honored at the 11th annual Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema, which starts tomorrow. "I haven't a clue what fuels my work, outside of research and my need for self-mockery," Russell said of the devil's advocacy and flawed heroism in his films.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2002 | By DAVID GORGOS & DAVID BLEILER For the Daily News
A member of the Royal Shakespeare Company at age 23, Oscar-nominated at age 29 for directing and starring in "Henry V," and recently headlining such disparate projects as a John Grisham thriller ("The Gingerbread Man") and a Woody Allen comedy ("Celebrity"), Ireland's Kenneth Branagh has somehow managed to elude Hollywood stardom. This is due, in part, to his choice of offbeat projects like "How to Kill Your Neighbor's Dog" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $24.99), new to video this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From exploitation movies such as Jailhouse Rock (1957) to exploration movies such as Stranger Inside (2001), prison dramas provide potent metaphors of bondage and freedom. "Prison Breaks: Redemption, Re-volution and Reality," a provocative series starting tomorrow for Film at the Prince, covers the penal panorama. Curator Denise Brown includes potboilers such as Black Mama, White Mama (1972) a blaxploitation film starring Pam Grier, as well as premieres of serious dramas such as Darnell Martin's Prison Song (2000)
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