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World Government

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NEWS
March 24, 1991 | By Glenn Berkey, Special to The Inquirer
A lot of people have been talking lately about a "new world order. " John and Marjorie Ewbank of Southampton have been working on a new world order for more than 50 years. The Ewbanks plan to go to Troia, Portugal, next month as delegates at an assembly that will review, and possibly revise, the constitution for the Federation of Earth. The Ewbanks were present at two world federalist conventions in 1968, in Switzerland and West Germany, where the world constitution was drawn up. The goal of world federalists is to achieve the disarmament of nations and establish a world government.
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | By Samuel Hughes, Special to The Inquirer
Charles Price is used to being told that his goals are a bit . . . far- fetched. He's been hearing it for 40 years now, ever since, in the chilliest moments of the Cold War, he first heard the Word of World Federalism and began trying to spread it to the rest of the world. The world, of course, is a notoriously recalcitrant place, and it has been somewhat less than receptive to the Word - which holds that the world needs a governing body (either the United Nations or something similar)
NEWS
March 23, 1997 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A book and a world war got John J. Logue to join the world federalist movement. An abiding interest in government and the conviction that there are better ways than armed conflict to solve international disputes have kept him involved ever since. Logue, 73, a 30-year resident of Swarthmore, is now senior vice president of the World Federalist Association. The 11,000-member Washington D.C.-based group advocates establishing a world government with many of the powers that individual nations have today.
NEWS
April 10, 1999
Clinton trying to save legacy? The United States is playing world cop, telling other nations like Yugoslavia and Iraq, among others, how to behave, coercing them economically and bombing them if they refuse to obey our will. To see our fearless leader, Bill Clinton, the First Draft Dodger, clenching his fists and grimly warning the miscreants of what they face if they continue their behavior, reminds me of some old-time schoolteacher terrorizing naughty children with a big paddle.
NEWS
November 17, 1990
BUSH-GORBY'S 'NEW ORDER' A RED-CONTRIVED ONE-WORLD PLOY The Soviets have over 7,000 military advisors in Iraq, including their top expert on tactical tank warfare. This contrived Mideast "crisis" leads to the question: Who benefits? The Soviet Union is the world's largest producer and exporter of oil. Each dollar increase per barrel drains $2 billion per year from the U.S. economy and adds $2 billion a year to Soviet hard currency. Increased aid to Eastern Europe from the U.S. pays for Soviet oil, further enriching Soviet coffers.
NEWS
August 14, 2010 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
It hasn't been mentioned in the New York Times or the Washington Post since 2002. The Inquirer last referred to it in 2006. But no matter what the mainstream media might say, an international agreement known as Agenda 21 ranks as one of the greatest threats in the world to the liberties of Americans. So say the organizers of the Freedom Action National Conference, a gathering of conservative and libertarian groups now in its third day at the Dolce Valley Forge hotel in King of Prussia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
H.G. Wells' remarkable popularity shows no signs of diminishing nearly 70 years after his death. It's nowhere more apparent than in Hollywood, which continues to churn out adaptations of   the science-fiction pioneer's output, which includes The Time Machine (1895), The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), and The War of the Worlds (1898). Yet Wells' later, politically charged work is virtually ignored today. A committed socialist, he wrote passionately in the 1920s and '30s about the dangers of extreme nationalism, and called instead for a united world government organized around Marxist ideals.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
God's Country was a last-minute substitution in the InterAct Theatre Company schedule, but artistic director Seth Rozin could not have picked a more timely work for a company that aspires to political and social relevance. With ultraright organizations in the news in the wake of the Oklahoma City bombing and a pair of Allentown skinheads accused of murdering their parents, the play, though it was written seven years ago, is certainly theater for the moment. Steven Dietz's docudrama details the activities of members of the Order, a white supremacist, antigovernment organization that in 1983 and '84 perpetrated what prosecutors called one of the most successful crime waves in U.S. history.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
H.G. Wells' remarkable popularity shows no signs of diminishing nearly 70 years after his death. It's nowhere more apparent than in Hollywood, which continues to churn out adaptations of   the science-fiction pioneer's output, which includes The Time Machine (1895), The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), and The War of the Worlds (1898). Yet Wells' later, politically charged work is virtually ignored today. A committed socialist, he wrote passionately in the 1920s and '30s about the dangers of extreme nationalism, and called instead for a united world government organized around Marxist ideals.
NEWS
January 26, 2012
Obama must target Pentagon Three cheers for President Obama, whose State of the Union address targeted some of the culprits of economic woe for millions of Americans: fraudulent lenders and corporate offshorers of jobs ("Obama asks fair shot for all," Wednesday). The president vowed relief in the form of prosecution and tax-code reform, to hold accountable those who have profited from lax law enforcement and tax loopholes. He even braved the rough waters of Pentagon spending cuts, by offering to use war savings to plug the deficit and mend our infrastructure, an offer guaranteed to bring crocodile tears from a Defense Department that is used to ever-growing budgets.
NEWS
August 14, 2010 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
It hasn't been mentioned in the New York Times or the Washington Post since 2002. The Inquirer last referred to it in 2006. But no matter what the mainstream media might say, an international agreement known as Agenda 21 ranks as one of the greatest threats in the world to the liberties of Americans. So say the organizers of the Freedom Action National Conference, a gathering of conservative and libertarian groups now in its third day at the Dolce Valley Forge hotel in King of Prussia.
NEWS
June 9, 2010
SOMETHING'S in the air each budget season that makes Ed Rendell plain squirrelly. He gets more loose-lipped and spends time in a place I call "Ed World. " These blunders/side trips are as reliable as traffic jams on the Schuylkill. Take the flap over hiring former press aide and deputy mayor Kevin Feeley to craft a message to help get things Ed wants in the pending budget. The Inky reported that taxpayers went on the hook for $30,000 for Feeley, who now runs Philly PR firm Bellevue Communications, to deliver a "legacy project" for Ed, who leaves office in January.
NEWS
March 19, 2004 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Could The Real World really be coming back to Philadelphia? Gov. Rendell, U.S. Rep. Robert Brady (D., Pa.), and Mayor Street yesterday each phoned the show's producers in Van Nuys, Calif. A Rendell spokeswoman said the governor called to "apologize for what had developed" and asked the company to reconsider its decision to pull out of Philadelphia. It was not clear whether the producers - spooked by their reception from labor unions - were offered anything. The officials had not received a reply by late afternoon, a Rendell spokeswoman said.
NEWS
April 10, 1999
Clinton trying to save legacy? The United States is playing world cop, telling other nations like Yugoslavia and Iraq, among others, how to behave, coercing them economically and bombing them if they refuse to obey our will. To see our fearless leader, Bill Clinton, the First Draft Dodger, clenching his fists and grimly warning the miscreants of what they face if they continue their behavior, reminds me of some old-time schoolteacher terrorizing naughty children with a big paddle.
NEWS
March 23, 1997 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A book and a world war got John J. Logue to join the world federalist movement. An abiding interest in government and the conviction that there are better ways than armed conflict to solve international disputes have kept him involved ever since. Logue, 73, a 30-year resident of Swarthmore, is now senior vice president of the World Federalist Association. The 11,000-member Washington, D.C.-based group advocates establishing a world government that would have many of the powers that individual nations have today.
NEWS
February 19, 1996 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
By the time the 1996 Republican presidential primary circus comes to Pennsylvania on April 23, the show will be over. Fully 67 percent of all delegates to the GOP convention will have been chosen. The identity of the winning candidate will have been known for at least six weeks. But we can pretend we're voting tomorrow in New Hampshire, a primary that really matters. To help you make a choice, here are excerpts from the standard stump speeches the major candidates have been giving in Rotary Clubs and church basements in the Granite State for the past four months.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
God's Country was a last-minute substitution in the InterAct Theatre Company schedule, but artistic director Seth Rozin could not have picked a more timely work for a company that aspires to political and social relevance. With ultraright organizations in the news in the wake of the Oklahoma City bombing and a pair of Allentown skinheads accused of murdering their parents, the play, though it was written seven years ago, is certainly theater for the moment. Steven Dietz's docudrama details the activities of members of the Order, a white supremacist, antigovernment organization that in 1983 and '84 perpetrated what prosecutors called one of the most successful crime waves in U.S. history.
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