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NEWS
December 16, 2003 | Stanley Crouch
Stanley Crouch is a columnist for the New York Daily News When gangsters such as Saddam Hussein are captured, the question of justice is raised as high as it can ever be. I began thinking about this when Pol Pot was arrested in Cambodia. Looking at that little man, I began to wonder what should be done with someone who had ordered the murder of millions. Next to the immeasurable pain and grief such butchers bring into the world, the ancient rule of an eye for an eye seems inadequate.
NEWS
August 17, 2012
The National Science Foundation said Thursday that it was awarding the Franklin Institute more than $5 million to educate Philadelphians and other urban residents about climate change. The institute will share the money with partners in New York, Pittsburgh, and Washington. "Education and research provide the key to American innovation and to securing our future as world leaders," said U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.) in announcing the grant. "That includes leadership to combat human-created climate change while we still have time to act. " The educational outreach will include K-12 classrooms as well as programs aimed at adult residents in neighborhoods around Philadelphia, said Steve Snyder, the institute's vice president for exhibits and program development.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Sylvia Hui and Raphael Satter, Associated Press
LONDON - World leaders sent in their congratulations and Catholics around the world were celebrating Wednesday after the Vatican announced the election of Argentine Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio to the papacy - making him the first pontiff from the Americas. Wednesday was "a momentous day for the 1.2 billion Catholics around the world," British Prime Minister David Cameron said in a message posted to Twitter, while German Chancellor Angela Merkel, the daughter of a Lutheran pastor, said millions of Catholics and non-Catholics alike would be looking to the new pope for guidance not just in questions of faith but in matters of peace, justice, and protecting creation.
NEWS
September 7, 2000 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In his valedictory address before the United Nations and a historic assembly of world leaders, President Clinton yesterday urged Israel and the Palestinians to "take the hard risks for peace" while a window of opportunity remained open. Yet, lofty sentiments notwithstanding, Clinton appeared to make little headway toward that goal in daylong meetings with Prime Minister Ehud Barak of Israel, Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat, and other heads of state from the Middle East. After Clinton's separate meetings with Barak and Arafat, White House spokesman Joe Lockhart said: "We did not expect today to be a breakthrough.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | By DOROTHY STORCK
The Esalen Institute, which sponsored Boris Yeltsin's trip to the United States, has strongly denied published reports that the Soviet politician was drunk on Jack Daniels for much of the tour and went on uncontrolled shopping sprees. "If there was any problem with Yeltsin, it was jet lag," said a spokesman. Which opens up a fascinating area for study. Jet lag can lead to a week- long binge and a bouncing assault on Bloomingdale's. I believe it. I believe jet lag can lead to almost anything, including divorce and the destruction of nations.
NEWS
September 10, 1999
The largest city in East Timor is "a ghost town with not much left to loot," says the top U.N. official there. The commercial district has been ransacked, the university torched. Paramilitary forces have killed hundreds of innocent people since the East Timorese voted overwhelmingly in favor of independence from Indonesia, which took this former Portuguese colony by force in 1975. A Vatican publication reports that a grenade attack at one church complex massacred 100 people. East Timor, which covers half an island north of Australia, is a killing field.
NEWS
March 14, 1996
The symbolism of kings, presidents, prime ministers and top-ranking diplomats gathering at a Red Sea resort yesterday to stand alongside former enemies and declare war on terrorism cannot be underestimated. But it cannot be enough. The summit of world leaders was intended to save the Mideast peace process. The guest list alone was proof that the diplomatic dynamic of the region has been forever altered. Top representatives from the United States, 12 moderate Arab states, Europe and Russia stood with Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres and Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat to reassure both embattled leaders that they were not alone.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | By Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Getting Mikhail S. Gorbachev out of his necktie and into a horseshoe pit may not have seemed like much of an accomplishment for George Bush, a man who tries to be photographed at least once a week with a dead fish, a golf club or sweaty jogging companions. But the two world leaders, who spent a great deal of time getting to know each other at this "up-close and personal" summit, reached one superpower agreement: They can do business. The Soviet leader, rarely seen in anything less formal than his tailored suit, at first resisted Bush's style of mixing business with pleasure.
NEWS
February 14, 1994 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Megan Gilman admits she is not interested in the pressures of political life - especially when she considers that many world leaders live with the threat of assassination. But the Baldwin School junior will have to put her fears aside for four days this week when she portrays President Clinton at the North American Invitational Model United Nations at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. "I realize there are a lot of people around the world who don't like Bill Clinton, and I'm worried about being assassinated," Gilman said, taking on her presidential role during an interview.
NEWS
February 7, 1996 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
If anyone is unconvinced of the power of love, Rob Rosenheck can show them his book. A New York-based photographer/musician who studied at the University of Pennsylvania, Rosenheck spent six years enlisting world leaders, entertainment celebrities and regular Joes to pose with his Love sign. Spike Lee, Mikhail Gorbachev, Jesse Jackson, the Beastie Boys and a homeless man on a grate on Arch Street all have said cheese with the pop-art sculpture in hand. Others, such as Margaret Thatcher and Ted Kennedy, posed with the Aquarian-age relic on the condition that they didn't have to touch it. The result of Rosenheck's ongoing photographic tour led to "The Love Book" (MacMillan/$17.
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