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NEWS
May 5, 2005 | By Dan Reimold INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julie Pompizzi knows the odds are stacked against her. The La Salle University graduating senior, who's been selected as the featured speaker at the school's commencement ceremony May 15, said she understands there are an endless number of possible distractions that may leave the audience less than captive during her remarks - cell phones, beach balls, digital camera flashes, windy weather, crying babies, and maybe even a streaker. "I've never spoken to such a large crowd," said Pompizzi, a communication and English major from Upper Darby.
NEWS
April 9, 2005 | By Ken Dilanian, Patricia Montemurri and Matthew Schofield INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Before an immense crowd of the powerful and the humble, amid cheers, laughter, tears, and shouts of "Saint," the Roman Catholic Church said a final goodbye to Pope John Paul II yesterday in a majestic 2 1/2-hour funeral Mass broadcast to nearly every corner of the world. The ceremony, a rich pageant of prayer and song in a variety of languages, was seen in churches, homes, and open-air gathering places throughout Europe and the Americas, as well as Africa and Asia. In Italy, even MTV carried the funeral without interruption.
NEWS
April 6, 2005 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Old and young, devout and curious, in nuns' habits and in tight jeans, black, white, Hispanic and Asian - they came by the hundreds of thousands yesterday, waiting in lines as long as eight hours to get a fleeting glimpse of Pope John Paul II's body lying in state at St. Peter's Basilica. "Would you look at this? This is unbelievable," said Vincenzo Peluso, a Newark police officer from Barnegat, N.J., who happened to be in Rome on vacation. Peluso was gazing down the broad boulevard leading into St. Peter's Square, surveying a crush of humanity for as far as the eye could see. Italian officials calculated that more than a million people would have walked past the pontiff's body by the end of yesterday, with two days to go before the funeral Friday morning.
NEWS
April 5, 2005 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With two million pilgrims and 200 world leaders descending on the city in advance of Friday's papal funeral, Rome is grappling with a logistics and security challenge of unprecedented proportions. The two most recent papal funerals, both in 1978, attracted 750,000 and 500,000 mourners and a few heads of state. But Friday's farewell to John Paul II is expected to draw several times as many mourners and many world leaders, including President Bush, who will be the first U.S. president to attend a papal memorial service.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2005 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice visited world leaders in 10 cities in eight days, the media covered it in breathless detail - right down to her shoes, silhouette and softness. The following is not made up. PARIS - On her first foreign trip as President Bush's chief diplomat, Rice is displaying a sophisticated style right at home on the streets and in the salons of taste-making capitals such as Rome and Paris. Her custom-made suits have included a black boucle number with gold brocade that probably cost more than your first car. (Associated Press, Feb. 9.)
NEWS
January 28, 2005 | Daily News wire services
Image isn't cheap The Bush administration has spent $250 million on public relations since taking office four years ago, a panel of congressional Democrats said yesterday, calling for reining in tax-funded efforts to sway public opinion. Last year, the administration spent more than $88 million on public-relations contracts, up from $37 million in 2001, according to an analysis by House Government Reform Committee Democrats. Top military contractors Lockheed Martin remained the top U.S. military contractor in 2004, receiving $20.7 billion in contract awards from the Defense Department.
NEWS
November 22, 2004 | By Ron Hutcheson and Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
On the final day of a 21-nation summit that ended with a joint commitment to work against terrorism and for free trade, President Bush yesterday assured Mexican President Vicente Fox that he would press to ease U.S. immigration laws, despite resistance in Congress. Bush's renewed commitment to overhaul U.S. immigration laws was welcome news to Fox, who would like to see an open border between the two countries. Bush's plan would give legal status to millions of illegal immigrants by letting them become temporary workers.
NEWS
September 22, 2004 | By Ron Hutcheson and Warren Strobel INQUIRER NATIONAL STAFF
President Bush yesterday urged nations around the world to help Iraq become a democracy and predicted that "freedom will find a way" to flourish. Standing before the 191-member United Nations, Bush acknowledged the difficulties of Iraq's chaotic transition from dictatorship to representative government. He said U.N. members "must respond" to pleas for help from Iraq's interim leaders. Interim Iraqi Prime Minister Ayad Allawi was among nearly 100 world leaders who listened to Bush's speech in the cavernous U.N. chamber.
NEWS
August 5, 2004 | By Shashank Bengali INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For President Bush, his family and his top aides, the most generous foreign leader last year was Saudi Crown Prince Abdullah. The State Department's annual tally of gifts to administration officials shows Abdullah gave them $127,600 in jewelry and other presents, including a diamond-and-sapphire jewelry set for Laura Bush that was valued at $95,500. The Saudi royal family's gifts dwarfed those of other world leaders, according to the tally, and easily eclipsed Abdullah's $55,020 in gifts in 2002.
NEWS
June 11, 2004 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Tens of thousands of Americans and foreign visitors from all walks of life filed past the casket of Ronald Reagan yesterday, pausing to pay their respects to the nation's 40th president. World leaders including his long-ago Soviet rival Mikhail S. Gorbachev were among those who gazed upon his casket in hushed contemplation in the Capitol Rotunda. President Bush, back from his meeting with world leaders in Georgia, briefly paid respects in advance of his eulogy at the national funeral today at Washington National Cathedral.
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