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NEWS
February 10, 1996 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Projections show a slowing in world population growth, but humans are still consuming too many resources and producing insufficient food supplies, scientists warn. The result, these biologists, agronomists and economists say, could be increased starvation and disease, and a global bidding war for dwindling food stocks. These themes emerged yesterday in a series of papers at the American Association for the Advancement of Science's annual meeting here. The AAAS is the nation's main science organization.
LIVING
December 9, 1996 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Susan McCouch, there is not much difference between wheat and weeds. In fact, the answer to feeding the world lies, she suspects, in the weeds, not the wheat. It is in those weeds - the wild ancestors of crops such as oats, rice and wheat - that McCouch is trying to find the keys to growing bigger, stronger and more fertile plants. Like miners panning for gold, McCouch and her colleagues at Cornell University are sifting through the genes of wild plants, looking for genetic nuggets that will bolster the world's basic staple crops.
NEWS
January 6, 1987
The meaning was garbled in the editing of a letter Dec. 31 from M.K. Stone. Referring to the writer of an anti-abortion letter, Stone wrote: ". . . She does not say what should be done if and when the world population grows too large for the maximum food supply. Her concern for life is questionable because she says nothing about the nuclear arms race . . . "
NEWS
April 28, 2003
SARS has arrived. People wearing masks to protect themselves is laughable. A virus is a hundred times smaller than a bacteria, so the mask blocks the virus from inhalation about 0.001 percent of the time. Why is it here? Where did it come from? Answer: Overpopulation and the mysterious bowels of nature. Nature senses and reacts to its environment. If there are too many living creatures, it will send forth a system (a disease) to relieve and correct the problem. Since Adam and Even started the human race eons ago, the number of humans has exploded on this finite globe.
NEWS
November 1, 2011
LAGOS, NIGERIA - In Nigeria, newborn twins have to share a bassinet in a crowded public hospital that doesn't have enough electricity. "Where there is life, there is hope," their mother said. But as the world's population surpasses seven billion, fears are stirring anew about how the planet will cope with the needs of so many humans. The United Nations marked the milestone yesterday, even though it is impossible to pinpoint the arrival of the globe's seven billionth occupant because millions of people are born and die each day. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said the day was "not about one newborn or even one generation" but "about our entire human family.
NEWS
May 19, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
INFERTILITY. American couples spent $1 billion last year to combat infertility, and half of them ended up conceiving children. That's according to the congressional Office of Technology Assessment, which reports that there are 2 million to 3 million infertile U.S. couples and that they can spend from a few hundred dollars to $22,000 on diagnoses and treatments. The agency also reports nearly half the clinics doing in-vitro fertilization have yet to achieve a live birth. SPACE SNOWBALLS.
NEWS
April 3, 1997 | By William Hollingsworth
Mark Twain dismissed premature reports of his death as exaggerated. It would be both premature and an exaggeration to dismiss the threat of the world's population explosion, though the United Nations reports that the rate of population growth is slowing. Human-population growth is still awesome in size. If the United Nations' newest projections prove true, world population in 2050 will number 9.4 billion people. Today's human family is estimated to number 5.77 billion, so that would be an increase of 3.6 billion people in the next 54 years.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
So the kids are outgrowing the house. The soccer team is overflowing the van. The classrooms are crowded, the highways are clogged and even the paths in the park are teeming with hikers, bikers and skaters. Then think about this. Sometime yesterday - somewhere between Philadelphia and the polar icecaps - some squalling little bundle became the 6 billionth person on the planet. The United Nations pinned the honor on a newborn boy in Bosnia. But any of the kids born in Philly yesterday could just as well have been the 6 billionth.
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | Daily News wire services
LONDON STUDY: SMOKING HASTENS AIDS A British study has confirmed prior suspicions: HIV-infected people who smoke develop full-blown AIDS twice as quickly as people with the virus who don't smoke. "Cigarettes and HIV together double the insult on the immune system," said Dr. Richard Nieman, a research fellow at the National Heart and Lung Institute in London. The findings are to be published Friday in AIDS, an international science journal. Nieman said the smokers developed AIDS in about 8.2 months compared to 14.5 months among non-smokers.
NEWS
July 28, 2002 | By Jan Lundqvist
For most of us who live in industrialized or highly urbanized parts of the world, water comes "naturally," flowing from faucets into bathtubs or lawn sprinklers. It is available when and where we want it. Water is seldom a major worry in our daily lives and its connection to droughts and floods, or even precipitation, seems remote. Yet, it is the natural world that produces our water, sometimes in excess, sometimes short of our needs and wants. It is rarely recognized that the amount of water we use at home is but a fraction of what is required by society.
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NEWS
February 17, 2013
Jonathan V. Last is a senior writer at the Weekly Standard and the author of "What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster" In Washington, politicians are trying to reform America's immigration system, again. Both President Obama and Sen. Marco Rubio (R., Fla.) are proposing "paths to citizenship" for an estimated 11 million illegal immigrants. Other proposals abound, including finishing the border fence, creating a better E-Verify system for employers, and passing the last Congress' Dream Act. All of these ideas, however, fundamentally misunderstand immigration in America: Future immigration is probably going to be governed not by U.S. domestic policy choices but by global demographics.
NEWS
November 1, 2011
LAGOS, NIGERIA - In Nigeria, newborn twins have to share a bassinet in a crowded public hospital that doesn't have enough electricity. "Where there is life, there is hope," their mother said. But as the world's population surpasses seven billion, fears are stirring anew about how the planet will cope with the needs of so many humans. The United Nations marked the milestone yesterday, even though it is impossible to pinpoint the arrival of the globe's seven billionth occupant because millions of people are born and die each day. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said the day was "not about one newborn or even one generation" but "about our entire human family.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2011 | By Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nonstop parade of killers, crooks, and con artists on the nightly news is enough to leave anyone with a dim view of human nature and pining for the good old days. But what if the good old days weren't so good after all? Steven Pinker, professor of psychology at Harvard University and best-selling author of "The Blank Slate," has mustered a mountain of data that tracks violence through the centuries. "The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined" (Viking)
NEWS
October 17, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
The world recently passed one significant date, and it's headed for another. No, I don't mean Yom Kippur or Thanksgiving. Sept. 27 was Earth Overshoot Day, designated by the Global Footprint Network as the time when the planet's humans surpassed "nature's budget" for the year. Since then, we've been exceeding the resources the Earth can generate, says the network, a nonprofit research group based in California. At the rate we're going, we need as much as 1.5 Earths to sustain us, the group says.
NEWS
October 14, 2011 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nonstop parade of killers, crooks and con artists on the nightly news is enough to leave anyone with a dim view of human nature and pining for the good old days. But what if the good old days weren't so good after all? Steven Pinker, professor of psychology at Harvard and best-selling author of "The Blank Slate," has mustered a mountain of data that tracks violence through the centuries. "The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence has Declined" (Viking) is the result, an 800-page argument that examines violence from major wars to infanticide, genocide to child abuse, and murder to bullying.
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By Laura E. Huggins
On this 40th anniversary of Earth Day, prepare to be bombarded with apocalyptic tales of disaster. But don't let the gloom-and-doom-fest get you down. Odds are the doomsters will be wrong. To help "celebrate" the first Earth Day in 1970, biologist Barry Commoner wrote, "We are in an environmental crisis which threatens the survival of this nation, and of the world as a suitable place of human habitation. " In a speech at Swarthmore College that year, ecologist Kenneth Watt said, "If present trends continue, the world will be about 4 degrees colder for the global mean temperature in 1990, but 11 degrees colder in the year 2000.
NEWS
February 27, 2005 | By Jeremy Schmidt FOR THE INQUIRER
They are the planet's greatest travelers. For thousands of years and more, they have followed well-worn paths across continents and around the globe. Some routes are literally beaten into the ground. Others are invisible trails in the air or water. The travelers are long-distance wildlife migrants: geese, cranes, butterflies, whales, caribou and songbirds by the millions. Their annual journeys are events of power and profound mystery. Who hasn't been moved by the sound of migrating geese honking high overhead on a chilly spring night?
NEWS
April 28, 2003
SARS has arrived. People wearing masks to protect themselves is laughable. A virus is a hundred times smaller than a bacteria, so the mask blocks the virus from inhalation about 0.001 percent of the time. Why is it here? Where did it come from? Answer: Overpopulation and the mysterious bowels of nature. Nature senses and reacts to its environment. If there are too many living creatures, it will send forth a system (a disease) to relieve and correct the problem. Since Adam and Even started the human race eons ago, the number of humans has exploded on this finite globe.
NEWS
July 28, 2002 | By Jan Lundqvist
For most of us who live in industrialized or highly urbanized parts of the world, water comes "naturally," flowing from faucets into bathtubs or lawn sprinklers. It is available when and where we want it. Water is seldom a major worry in our daily lives and its connection to droughts and floods, or even precipitation, seems remote. Yet, it is the natural world that produces our water, sometimes in excess, sometimes short of our needs and wants. It is rarely recognized that the amount of water we use at home is but a fraction of what is required by society.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | By B. Meredith Burke
There are clubs whose memberships ought not to grow. That of countries with 1 billion or more population is certainly among them. Even China and India are two too many. Yet the just-released year 2000 U.S. Census total shows us racing pell-mell to this dubious goal. At 281 million, we have gained nearly 33 million since 1990 - and 81 million since 1970, year of the first Earth Day. Pennsylvania, one of the slowest-growth states, nonetheless gained 400,000 people. This betokens a continued upward trend.
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