CollectionsWorld Power
IN THE NEWS

World Power

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 31, 1997 | By Xiao-huang Yin
The prevailing consensus in international affairs is that China will soon aggressively seek its place as a world power, a status it enjoyed for 2,000 years but lost in the last century. Accordingly, the regime that 92-year-old Deng Xiaoping will leave behind - a communist state bent on capitalist development - is seen as a threat and may have to be contained. But ideology notwithstanding, China is far from an emerging world power like Kaiser Wilhelm's Germany in the 1890s. The reason can be found in two interrelated trends and their implications for China's political and economic life.
NEWS
February 24, 1998 | By Leo Wieland, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
When he took office in 1993, Bill Clinton promised the "most ethical administration" in American history. After that came Whitewater, "Paulagate," "FBI Filegate" [and] "Travelgate" . . . Now . . . even Clinton's supporters are asking whether he hasn't used up his credit. . . . How long can a world power be governed by a man who is the brunt of nightly jokes on TV?
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Five years ago, a wave of pro-democracy protests across the Arab world sparked hope the region was changing for the better. But Arab Spring led to a new wave of repression, tyranny, unrest, and civil war. Will the region ever achieve stability, much less democracy? To discuss that question, three Middle East experts appear this week at the Free Library of Philadelphia - former NSA director and CIA chief Michael V. Hayden (Monday), exiled Iranian human rights lawyer Shirin Ebadi (Wednesday)
SPORTS
September 14, 2004 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Soccer Federation is billing it as a "Fan Celebration Tour," a last chance to see Mia Hamm and some of her celebrated retiring teammates on the U.S. women's soccer team. Eight of the 10 cities on the tour have been announced, most of them yesterday. According to several sources, the ninth stop will be Lincoln Financial Field on Nov. 6, when the United States plays Denmark. An official announcement of the Philadelphia stop is expected this week. None of the opponents is a world power.
SPORTS
April 20, 1999 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Women's World Cup, which is being billed as the largest women's sporting event in the world, will be held in the United States this summer. And even though the Philadelphia area will not be hosting a World Cup game, local soccer fans will have a chance to see some of the world's best teams in training at the United Sports Training Center in Downingtown. The United States team, one of the favorites in the 16-team field, is scheduled to begin two days of training this morning at the Marshallton-Thorndale Road facility.
NEWS
November 2, 1997
Last week's summit visit by China's President Jiang Zemin bore an uncanny resemblance to the old U.S.-Soviet summits. President Clinton showed his determination to do business (strategically and commercially) with the leader of an emerging great power, but the debate between the two men over human rights was public and harsh. The formal staginess of the affair - with no signs of "bonding" between the leaders - reflected the many question marks about America's relationship with China.
SPORTS
July 15, 1997 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The United States, spurred by strong play from Cardinal O'Hara graduate Kristin "Ace" Clement, won its first-ever gold medal in junior women's basketball, defeating defending champion Australia, 78-74, in overtime in Natal, Brazil, Sunday night. Clement, a 5-foot-11 guard who will attend Tennessee in the fall, averaged 11.1 points during the seven-game world championships, with a high game of 19 in Saturday's 90-77 semifinal victory over Slovakia. In the final, Clement scored nine points and had five steals in a game-high 41 minutes.
NEWS
April 3, 1991 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Our escapades in the Persian Gulf notwithstanding, the United States has learned a lot of tough lessons in recent years about its stature as a world power. First, we lost our lead in automobile manufacturing. Then, it was Olympic basketball. Most recently, U.S. pro baseball players lost a series of all-star games to the Japanese. Through it all, I remained calm because I believed that no matter how bad things got, America would never lose its position as the world's leading maker of violent action movies.
NEWS
January 3, 2016
A History of Ancient Rome By Mary Beard Liveright. 535 pp. $35 Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer Mary Beard begins her fine history of ancient Rome in medias res, in the middle of things, more than six centuries after the appearance of the little town on the Tiber that would grow into a world power. Beard, a professor of classics at Cambridge University, has her reasons for coming in halfway through the show. As the real origins of Rome are lost in the mists of myth (forget that she-wolf nursing Romulus and Remus)
NEWS
April 11, 1986 | BY NICHOLAS VON HOFFMAN
It's a new position for the United States and perhaps it shows that the country is standing tall, as they say, but earlier generations might have felt more shame than pride at seeing their country trying to overthrow, not one, but two foreign governments at the same time: Nicaragua and Libya. Fifty years ago when there was still a sizable body of opinion, much of it centered in the Republican Party, that believed America should mind its own business, there would have been mass meetings and a loud, long, public dissent at the White House's openly plotting to destroy another country's government, especially a country in distant and far-off Africa.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Five years ago, a wave of pro-democracy protests across the Arab world sparked hope the region was changing for the better. But Arab Spring led to a new wave of repression, tyranny, unrest, and civil war. Will the region ever achieve stability, much less democracy? To discuss that question, three Middle East experts appear this week at the Free Library of Philadelphia - former NSA director and CIA chief Michael V. Hayden (Monday), exiled Iranian human rights lawyer Shirin Ebadi (Wednesday)
NEWS
January 3, 2016
A History of Ancient Rome By Mary Beard Liveright. 535 pp. $35 Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer Mary Beard begins her fine history of ancient Rome in medias res, in the middle of things, more than six centuries after the appearance of the little town on the Tiber that would grow into a world power. Beard, a professor of classics at Cambridge University, has her reasons for coming in halfway through the show. As the real origins of Rome are lost in the mists of myth (forget that she-wolf nursing Romulus and Remus)
NEWS
September 25, 2012
Refusal to affirm freedom of speech No, the real outrage is the refusal of the Obama administration and of our government to vigorously affirm our belief in freedom of speech and freedom of the press, as confirmed in the First Amendment of our Constitution ("The real Muslim movie outrage," Sunday). As a result, the world does not know our beliefs, nor does the world know we are committed to defending these beliefs at any cost. Our beliefs may not condone stupidity, but they do validate our faith in freedom.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | By Bradley Klapper and Matthew Lee, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton headed Tuesday to Beijing, where a tense human-rights showdown awaits over the fate of a blind Chinese lawyer said to be under U.S. protection after escaping from house arrest. The issue of Chen Guangcheng's future threatens to overshadow this year's round of high-level strategic and economic talks between the world's two biggest economic powers. Talks begin Thursday. Publicly, the U.S. and Chinese governments have said nothing about the Chen case.
NEWS
December 27, 2011
Since the Great Recession of 2008, many have said that America's time as the leading power of the globe is past. Mark Steyn's best-selling After America: Get Ready for Armaged don offers the bracing budgetary fact that "we need $15 trillion just to be flat broke. " Thomas Friedman of the New York Times regularly suggests that China's high-speed trains and other modern accoutrements provide a stark contrast between the ever-progressing People's Republic and the physically and intellectually decaying American one. To underscore the reality of our decline, President Obama, who more than any past leader has spoken of America's many failings (real and imagined)
NEWS
October 12, 2005
Helping suburbs' elderly As I read how we will need to support seniors in the suburbs, I wondered if we are neglecting the strongest support that we have. Maybe we should turn our attention to the workforce that these seniors educated with their tax dollars - the young citizens of their own neighborhoods. High schools could foster a collaborative partnership with the aged in their communities by requiring the junior class, and particularly the senior class, to help in some capacity.
SPORTS
September 14, 2004 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Soccer Federation is billing it as a "Fan Celebration Tour," a last chance to see Mia Hamm and some of her celebrated retiring teammates on the U.S. women's soccer team. Eight of the 10 cities on the tour have been announced, most of them yesterday. According to several sources, the ninth stop will be Lincoln Financial Field on Nov. 6, when the United States plays Denmark. An official announcement of the Philadelphia stop is expected this week. None of the opponents is a world power.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | By Elsa C. Arnett, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Job description: Leader of the most powerful nation in the world. Perks: Big house. Walk to work. Private jet with snazzy official seal. Marine Corps Band on call. Annual salary: A measly $200,000 - less than the CEOs of Intel Corp., Coca-Cola Co. or General Motors Corp. Even a suburban Maryland superintendent of schools makes more. Recognizing that America's chief executive earns a pittance compared with his counterparts in business, entertainment, education, and practically every other field, the House of Representatives voted late Thursday to double the next president's salary.
SPORTS
April 20, 1999 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Women's World Cup, which is being billed as the largest women's sporting event in the world, will be held in the United States this summer. And even though the Philadelphia area will not be hosting a World Cup game, local soccer fans will have a chance to see some of the world's best teams in training at the United Sports Training Center in Downingtown. The United States team, one of the favorites in the 16-team field, is scheduled to begin two days of training this morning at the Marshallton-Thorndale Road facility.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|