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World Trade Center

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NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Tom Hays, Associated Press
NEW YORK - It had to be an accident. Though hard to imagine now, that was the prevailing theory moments after an explosion rocked the World Trade Center around noon on Feb. 26, 1993. The truth - that a cell of Islamic extremists had engineered a car-bomb attack that killed six people, injured more than 1,000, and caused more than a half-billion dollars in damage - "was incomprehensible at the time," FBI agent John Anticev said. Ahead of the 20-year anniversary of the bombing, Anticev and other current and former law enforcement officials involved in the case reflected on an event that taught them tough lessons about a dire threat from jihadists.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
To most, the World Trade Center is a reminder of terrorism's evil: two jetliners commandeered on a gorgeous September morning, bringing down New York's landmark twin towers, killing more than 2,700 and unhinging a nation. In Philadelphia, the World Trade Center is a bistate nonprofit fighting to be better known. The attention the World Trade Center of Greater Philadelphia (WTCGP) especially seeks is from the region's small businesses, a sector it says is missing tremendous growth opportunity by not exporting.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
The New York Vista Hotel, closed by the terrorist blast at the World Trade Center in February 1993, will reopen Nov. 1 after undergoing extensive renovations, including a new entryway and lobby. The 820-room hotel is located between the two towers of the World Trade Center and sustained extensive smoke damage as well as physical damage from the powerful explosion, which occurred in a garage beneath the hotel. One of the six people who died was a Vista employee. Overall, more than 1,000 people suffered from smoke inhalation.
NEWS
September 17, 2001 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert G. McIlvaine, 26, a rising star on Wall Street in the field of communications, died Tuesday in the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. Mr. McIlvaine, who grew up in Oreland and graduated from Upper Dublin High School in 1993, lived on Manhattan's Upper East Side. He was among the first casualties of the attack to be identified. Mr. McIlvaine, an assistant vice president of media relations for Merrill Lynch & Co., was attending a banking conference on the 106th floor of the World Trade Center's north tower - the first target of the strike.
NEWS
October 29, 2001 | By Kayce T. Ataiyero INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
This Bucks County township, which lost eight residents in the Sept. 11 attacks, is considering a memorial to those victims. Board of Supervisors Chairman Frank Fazzalore said the board had been mulling ways to remember the eight who died in the attacks on the World Trade Center, including Bill Godshalk, son of Supervisor Grace Godshalk. "It is all still in the planning stage," he said. "But we have had great citizen response over it. Some have come to us and said they want to raise funds to build it. I'm overwhelmed.
NEWS
March 3, 1993 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The clues to Friday's bombing of the World Trade Center appeared yesterday about as substantial as the grains of debris lying in the yawning crater beneath the complex. Investigators uncovered parts of a van that might have contained the huge bomb that gutted the underground garage between the twin towers. But authorities are not saying for sure that a car bomb was involved. Officials acknowledged that the videotapes they had recovered from two surveillance cameras in the garage "are marginal in quality at best.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a decaying wooden ship was discovered in the World Trade Center excavation pit four years ago, it posed a mystery. Where did it come from? How did it get there? Was it wrecked? Or was it sunk intentionally for landfill? Archaeologists, maritime experts, and tree-ring researchers last week announced their conclusions: The ship, believed to be a Hudson River sloop, was built shortly after 1773 in the bustling port of Philadelphia. The wood from the ship was matched not just to Philadelphia, but to the same sort of oak trees that were used to build the old State House, where the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1993 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Feb. 26, Steven Luthultz watched news footage of office workers fleeing the bomb-damaged World Trade Center in Manhattan with special interest. He took note of their soot-covered faces and raspy voices, evidence of their long descents to safety through smoky, fume-filled stairwells. Just three days before, Essex PB&R Corp., the small Elkton, Md., company that Luthultz manages, had introduced a small breathing device designed for emergencies such as the World Trade Center disaster.
NEWS
June 8, 2009 | By Jeff Shields and Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Rising on the bank of the Delaware River, Philadelphia's own World Trade Center promised nothing less than a new and brighter image for the city in international commerce. With four soaring towers at the foot of Callowhill Street, the gleaming complex would house 13,000 office workers and apartment residents with an investment of $1.1 billion in today's dollars. But now, two decades after the trade center was proposed in 1989, its New York developers are suing the city and three community groups, alleging that the high-rise vision was razed by a brand of neighborhood parochialism and political cowardice unique to Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | By Barbara Demick and Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Officials yesterday confirmed that it was indeed a bomb that gutted the mechanical core of the World Trade Center, and they said the search to determine who had planted the device could drag on for months. Officials said that the finding of nitrate indicated dynamite may have been used in the bomb that eviscerated the underground garage at the World Trade Center on Friday, killing five people and injuring more than 1,000. If dynamite had been used, rather than less easily obtained plastic explosives, the field of potential suspects would expand greatly.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
By the time they moved to Woolwich Township, Tony Gioia and Grace Ellis had already had their lives altered for the worse; both had lost loved ones on 9/11. Denise Dales had a new perspective on life on that morning nearly 14 years ago, too. Then a Woodbury resident, she had plans to attend a 9 a.m. work meeting at the South Tower of the World Trade Center, but canceled, uneasy about taking her 2-month-old son along. Gioia, Ellis, and Dales, who also moved to Woolwich after the attacks, will be in the procession Wednesday when township officials bring a 4,000-pound steel beam - a relic from a day of tragedy - to the township from New York City, for a future 9/11 memorial in front of the town hall.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
The conundrum for Superfit Inc. of Philadelphia is as complicated as love itself: The family-owned company has created a product it wants ring-wearers worldwide to know about, yet it's designed to go unnoticed. "We're still too much the best-kept secret in the world," said Gena Alulis, chief executive officer of a business trying to revolutionize, elegantly and unobtrusively, the way a ring is made to fit. Superfit's patented hinge-and-latch technology eliminates the annoying spinning that occurs when rings are sized to fit over a large knuckle, rather than fitted to the base of a finger.
NEWS
March 4, 2015
A Business column Sunday on Pennsylvania and international trade misidentified the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia and the World Trade Center of Greater Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dulce de leche is not currently a flavor offered by Philadelphia-based Bassetts Ice Cream Co. "Closest to that is our classic butterscotch vanilla, which has . . . those caramel notes that a dulce de leche does," Bassetts president Michael Strange said Wednesday when asked whether and how his company would serve Cuba if a U.S. plan to reestablish diplomatic ties and expand economic trade after nearly 53 years succeeds. "If we find the right retail partners there . . . and they give us direction on flavor . . . I would certainly look into developing those flavors," Strange said.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Will Bunch, Daily News Columnist
THIS YEAR'S 13th anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks is the first one since the May opening of the museum at the National September 11 Memorial at the former World Trade Center site in lower Manhattan. Visitors there can see significant and trivial reminders of that day - from the wallets of the dead and the dust-encrusted boots of rescue workers to the farewell letter written in Arabic by some of the al Qaeda terrorists - but for some the museum's lasting impression is its assertive and perhaps suffocating security.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
"It's the only job I ever had," says Eddie Gindi , co-owner of the eight New York-area Century 21 department stores. He is preparing another one for Philadelphia this fall. Scion of a retailing and real estate family, Gindi went to work for his father and uncle - who founded Century 21 - as a student in 1977. "Back then it was just two stores: Brooklyn Bay Ridge and Manhattan," across from the World Trade Center, he said. The store had been there since 1961, even before the towers.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a decaying wooden ship was discovered in the World Trade Center excavation pit four years ago, it posed a mystery. Where did it come from? How did it get there? Was it wrecked? Or was it sunk intentionally for landfill? Archaeologists, maritime experts, and tree-ring researchers last week announced their conclusions: The ship, believed to be a Hudson River sloop, was built shortly after 1773 in the bustling port of Philadelphia. The wood from the ship was matched not just to Philadelphia, but to the same sort of oak trees that were used to build the old State House, where the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
To most, the World Trade Center is a reminder of terrorism's evil: two jetliners commandeered on a gorgeous September morning, bringing down New York's landmark twin towers, killing more than 2,700 and unhinging a nation. In Philadelphia, the World Trade Center is a bistate nonprofit fighting to be better known. The attention the World Trade Center of Greater Philadelphia (WTCGP) especially seeks is from the region's small businesses, a sector it says is missing tremendous growth opportunity by not exporting.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside Courtroom II at Camp Justice on the sprawling Guantanamo Bay base in Cuba, eight visitors filed into a glass-protected gallery. It was a little after 9 a.m. on Oct. 22, before the start of a hearing for five men accused of plotting attacks in the United States. Jim Jenca, a 52-year-old married father of two from Levittown, took a seat in the front row. A big ex-Marine with a florid, round face, he couldn't sit still. Restless, he stood up. He put his face close to the glass partition.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bob Dougherty, a Cheltenham police officer from the K-9 unit, strides across a scrap yard in West Philadelphia, his boots crunching over gravel. Scrambling over a mountain of broken pallets and rubble, Dougherty crawls into one of several half-buried blue plastic barrels and pulls a wooden lid over the opening. Hide and seek has never been this serious. Inside, it is oppressively hot, and Dougherty is heavily clothed - helmet, long sleeves, long pants, thick canvas gloves. But he is doing this voluntarily, for a good cause.
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