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NEWS
April 11, 2004
On Saturday, May 29, the National World War II Memorial will be dedicated in Washington to honor the 16 million who served in the U.S. armed forces, the more than 400,000 who died, and the millions who supported the war effort from home. Did you or a close relative serve overseas during World War II? What is your most vivid memory of that experience, or of what it was like during the war here at home? Send your responses to World War II Voices, The Philadelphia Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia 19101.
NEWS
November 12, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The veterans were in their late teens and early 20s when they fought in places that most people now know only from history books: Normandy, the Ardennes, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa. But as the nation marks Veterans Day, 70 years later, their memories of World War II remain vivid, as if the physical and mental wounds of their service had been much more recent. Sam Laskin, 93, of Lower Providence Township, clearly recalls piloting a B-24 bomber, dubbed "Mean Kid," over a German target in France in 1944 when flak passed through his plane, seat, and right leg before exiting the fuselage.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | By Michael S. Sherry
As a chorus of voices reminds us this month, most Americans look back fondly on World War II. Despite all the death and destruction that war entailed, the fondness is well founded. The war completed America's escape from the Great Depression, improving living standards so much that life expectancy rose despite the death of 400,000 Americans in uniform. It prepared the United States to become economically and militarily dominant in the postwar world. It yielded a cornucopia of new technologies adaptable to civilian use - jet engines, televisions, computers.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert R. Purzycki didn't talk much about his World War II infantry experiences, even though he had earned a Bronze Star and a Silver Star. But when his daughter Dolores rented a copy of the 1998 film Saving Private Ryan, he watched it with her. "He said it was as close to realistic" as any such film, especially because he had survived the second wave of D-Day landings on Omaha Beach. What the film helped him recall, she said, was that as he waded toward the beach, "the water was red" with the blood of men who had died in the first wave of landings.
NEWS
November 2, 2012 | By MICHAEL O'SULLIVAN, The Washington Post
FRENCH WRITER Louis Pergaud's 1912 novel The War of the Buttons - an allegory of combat featuring rival "armies" of button-pilfering children - has been adapted for the screen twice before. A 1962 version set in rural France was followed by a 1994 adaptation set in Ireland. Although neither of those films took place during wartime, it was clear that their real message didn't have to do with buttons at all, but with the absurdity of our world's more grown-up battles. (As in the book, the children in the movies cut the buttons off their enemies' clothing to humiliate them and to send them home with their pants around their ankles.)
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By Dara McBride, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore L. Webster, 87, a decorated World War II veteran and longtime resident of Haddonfield, died Thursday, June 28, at Virtua Voorhees after several strokes. Mr. Webster received the Air Medal and Distinguished Flying Cross among other awards for his service in the Army Air Corps during World War II as a bombardier and navigator of a B-24 with the 376th Bombardment Group. Mr. Webster was stationed in North Africa and, as the war progressed, Germany, his son, Theodore Jr. said.
NEWS
November 23, 2012
Manuel Ignacio Bonet, 89, of Philadelphia, a decorated U.S. Army veteran of World War II, died of natural causes in Philadelphia on Saturday, Nov. 17. Born in Anasco, Puerto Rico, Mr. Bonet joined the service on April 16, 1942. He served in the 3266th Quartermaster Service Company and fought in Germany, according to his discharge papers. He was honorably discharged with the rank of private first class on Nov. 23, 1945. He was awarded the American Theater Service Medal, Good Conduct Medal, European African Middle Eastern Theater Service Medal with one Bronze Star, the WWII Victory Medal, and six overseas Service Bars.
NEWS
December 12, 2012
Vernon W. Sherlock, 95, a longtime resident of Broomall, died Wednesday, Dec. 5, at Lancaster General Hospital. A graduate of Upper Darby High School, Mr. Sherlock enlisted in the Army Air Corps on the day after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. He served four years in World War II and was posted to North Africa and Italy, including the Allied invasion of Sicily, his family said. Three days after returning to the United States, on Aug. 20, 1945, he married Dorothy Glasgow. They settled in Broomall and lived there for 50 years.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ANTHONY NIXON didn't realize what a fabulous mother he had until long after he had grown up and started to think about it. His mother, Rosemarie Nixon, wife of a prominent surgeon and mother of nine, was a paragon of old-fashioned duty and dedication. "We took it for granted that she got up before everybody else, took out the trash, did the shopping, cooked the meals, waxed the floors, encouraged her children to be the best they could be and never complained," Anthony said. "We didn't see anything odd or unusual about that.
NEWS
June 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Veto Iavecchia, 92, of Mayfair, a World War II veteran whose B-24 bomber was crippled by enemy flak over Germany in 1944, died Wednesday, May 29, at home. Mr. Iavecchia graduated in 1938 from Frankford High School, where he was the centerfielder for that year's Public League champions. His high-energy play earned him the nickname "Sparky. " Mr. Iavecchia enrolled in Army Air Forces flight school during World War II and was qualified as a bombardier in the 389th Bomb Group, Second Air Division, Eighth Air Force.
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NEWS
September 13, 2016 | By Michaela Winberg, STAFF WRITER
Paul B. Schimmel, 91, a World War II veteran who served as an infantryman in the Battle of the Bulge and was twice awarded a Purple Heart, died Thursday at the Sunrise Senior Living Facility in Haverford. Mr. Schimmel served in the Battle of the Bulge from Dec. 16, 1944, to Jan. 25, 1945, and spent some of his time in the Army helping refugees in camps in France. Although he "saw some real atrocities there," said his oldest son, Rob Schimmel, "one of his great pleasures was reliving the war, because it gave him an appreciation" for what he had in peace time.
NEWS
September 1, 2016
ISSUE | WORLD WAR II Honor vets while we can As the son of a World War II veteran, and a retired Navy officer, I read with great pleasure the article about the last formal reunion of the remaining members of "Merrill's Marauders," a volunteer band of 2,750 soldiers and officers who marched into a Burmese jungle in 1944 on a secret mission they were not expected to survive ("70th reunion for vets," Saturday). It is sad to think this could be the last time these courageous men might see each other and even sadder that the members of the greatest generation ever are quickly dwindling.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
FILM DIRECTOR Tina Morton says 80-year-old Adeline Behlin remembers when her family fled South Carolina for Philadelphia. "Her grandfather had been beaten by a mob for trying to organize black people to vote," Morton said. "He had worked on the railroad and when they beat him, they left him on the railroad tracks. He felt the vibration of a train coming and had just enough strength to crawl off the tracks. A neighbor found him. And the family fled the next day. " Morton recounts Behlin's story in "When We Came Up Here," one of several short films about people finding new lives in Philadelphia that will be shown Saturday at International House in West Philadelphia as part of a project called the Great Migration: A City Transformed.
NEWS
July 31, 2016
The Secret War Spies, Ciphers, and Guerrillas By Max Hastings Harper. 640 pp. $35 Reviewed by Paul Jablow At first glance, Joseph Rochefort was about as unlikely as a war hero gets. A mediocre (at best) naval officer, he narrowly escaped court martial when a destroyer on which he was the duty officer dragged its anchor in San Francisco bay amid six destroyers. He was transferred to cryptoanalysis when fellow officers noted his penchant for crossword puzzles and bridge.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
THEODORE J. BERRY, 98, a Main Line physician, author, and educator, died Thursday, July 14, of pneumonia at his home in Naples, Fla. Dr. Berry lived in Villanova and then Bryn Mawr before moving to Naples in 1999. He was a prominent figure at Bryn Mawr Hospital for 45 years, practicing internal medicine and serving for a time as chief of staff. He retired in 1993 as director of medical education. Although Dr. Berry was hard-driving and productive, he also was very genial. Quietly and discreetly, he was physician and friend to the Main Line's elite families.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Mary Previte believes there are special times when a simple thank-you note just will not do to express gratitude. So she plans to embark on a journey this week halfway across the world, to hand-deliver a personal thank-you more than 70 years after a heroic deed saved her life. Previte, of Haddonfield, will travel to China to personally express her appreciation to the last member of a daring group of seven rescuers who liberated her and 1,500 others from a Japanese prison camp during World War II. It took 18 years for Previte to locate the last man - Wang Cheng-Han, who was the Chinese interpreter for the liberation team.
TRAVEL
July 18, 2016
Answer: Albania. During the 1940s after World War II, it was the site of three incidents involving Royal Navy ships and Albania that resulted in the United Kingdom suing Albania in the International Court of Justice.  
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Vibha Kannan and Bonnie L. Cook, STAFF WRITERS
Albert V. Grifone, 92, of Newtown Square, former vice president and chief financial officer of Triangle Publications Inc., publisher of TV Guide, died Thursday, June 30, of congestive heart failure at White Horse Village. Mr. Grifone's business career at Triangle, under publisher Walter H. Annenberg, spanned more than four decades. He also served on the board of directors from 1975 to 1988, the year the company was sold. Despite Mr. Grifone's professional successes, family members said he remained humble and grounded.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
Edward W. Duchneskie, 88, who served in the U.S. Merchant Marine during World War II and later worked as manager of mechanical facilities at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, died Monday, July 4, at Virtua Marlton Hospital of kidney failure. Mr. Duchneskie, who lived in Cherry Hill, was born in Camden and worked at an early age to help his family, said his son, John, an assistant managing editor for the Inquirer. Mr. Duchneskie was a teenager when he joined the Merchant Marine during World War II. "He lied about his age to get into the war," his son said.
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