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World Youth Day

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NEWS
September 17, 2000
Spirit of pilgrimage remains long after her return home Some events happen so fast in life that we do not realize the vast impact they leave on us until they are over. This was especially evident in my trip to World Youth Day 2000, during which I had 11 days in August of a true pilgrimage experience. At first I became interested in World Youth Day solely for the purpose of seeing Rome. Spirituality, I figured, was an added bonus. In the weeks leading to the pilgrimage, however, my attitude changed.
NEWS
August 4, 2002
The 11-day pilgrimage known as World Youth Day, which ended last Sunday in Toronto, drew about half a million youths from 170 countries. Of the 500 from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia who attended, five share thoughts on their trip and their spirituality. Questions answered I had questions and doubts about my faith, and I embarked on the pilgrimage to have those questions answered. They were, through various discussions with priests and seminarians, but mainly through listening to Pope John Paul II. He said, "On the shores of Lake Ontario, we are reminded of another lake, the lake of Tiberius, on the shores of which the Lord Jesus made a fascinating proposal to the first disciples, some of whom were probably young like you. " When he said the apostles were not much older than us, I had a revelation.
NEWS
August 16, 2000 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The slumber of the Roman summer was broken by hymns and anthems yesterday as 600,000 young people from around the globe, many of them toting backpacks and sweating under a nasty sun, helped Pope John Paul II launch six days of World Youth celebrations. Mixing spiritual enlightenment with a party energy, groups of young pilgrims waved national flags and carried crosses as they traced the Tiber River toward St. Peter's Square. They strummed guitars, banged on bongo drums, and prayed and sang until twilight, the music of their diverse languages echoing from the Colosseum to the Pantheon.
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tom Angelucci, his religious faith riddled with doubts, closed his eyes and listened carefully to the words of his spiritual father, Pope John Paul II. The pontiff, standing before a crowd of thousands, spoke in personal terms about love of life, the challenge and promise of being young and Catholic, the rejection of "the culture of death. " Long moments passed. A gusty rain fell. Angelucci listened. Then he opened his eyes and looked toward heaven. Arched across the purple Denver sky was a misty rainbow.
NEWS
August 9, 1993 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He is the Vicar of Christ and the Bishop of Rome. He is the potentate of a small European theocracy, a globe-spanning prince of the faith who has logged so much air time tending his followers that his frequent-flier premiums would break Alitalia. But for millions of Catholic teenagers, Pope John Paul II is the spiritual kahuna - adored, respected, lavished with the kind of deferential passion usually reserved for rock stars and movie action heroes. Never mind that he hasn't schmoozed Madonna and wouldn't know gangsta rap from Saran Wrap.
NEWS
August 18, 2016
By Cynthia M. Allen The headlines the morning of July 26 were grim, as they are too often these days. The Rev. Jacques Hamel, an 85-year-old Roman Catholic priest, was murdered at the altar while saying Mass in a church in Rouen, France. His assailants, two teenage males armed with knives, reportedly declared their allegiance to the Islamic State before slaughtering him beneath the crucifix. As he lay dying, he is said to have whispered, "Go away, Satan," to the teens, whose actions were motivated by hatred.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | For The Inquirer / BARBARA JOHNSTON
While some catch up on sleep, other area teenagers paint a banner for next month's "sleeping bag pilgrimage" to Denver. There, they and 160,000 other young people will meet Pope John Paul II for World Youth Day. In preparation, about 200 Philadelphia Archdiocese youths gathered last weekend at Our Lady of Czestochowa Shrine in Doylestown Township for an overnight spiritual retreat.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield and Bradley Brooks, Associated Press
RIO DE JANEIRO - Pope Francis presided over one of the most solemn rites of the Catholic Church on Friday, a procession reenacting Christ's crucifixion in the improbable location of Rio's hedonistic Copacabana beach, as he headed into the home stretch of his first international trip for World Youth Day. The evening procession highlighted Francis' spiritual side a day after he showed off his rebel streak by calling on young Catholics to shake things up...
NEWS
August 16, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
The pope's visit to Denver made headlines last week. By next week, you can relive the trip via video. On Aug. 26, ABC News is releasing an original program titled "The Pope in Denver: Celebration and Challenge," hosted by Cokie Roberts. The documentary captures Pope John Paul II's historic visit to Denver to mark World Youth Day. The tape retails for $19.98. It can be obtained by calling 1-800-CALL-ABC. A Spanish-language version of the video will be narrated by ABC News Correspondent John Quinones.
NEWS
June 3, 2015
A review Tuesday of the ABC Family show Stitchers mischaracterized the disease suffered by the main character. The show calls it "temporal dysplasia. " A story Sunday on the musician Brian Wilson mischaracterized the availability of the documentary The Wrecking Crew by Denny Tedesco. The complete DVD with special features will be released June 16. A story Sunday wrongly described Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput's role in the Catholic Church's World Youth Day in Denver in 1993.
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NEWS
August 18, 2016
By Cynthia M. Allen The headlines the morning of July 26 were grim, as they are too often these days. The Rev. Jacques Hamel, an 85-year-old Roman Catholic priest, was murdered at the altar while saying Mass in a church in Rouen, France. His assailants, two teenage males armed with knives, reportedly declared their allegiance to the Islamic State before slaughtering him beneath the crucifix. As he lay dying, he is said to have whispered, "Go away, Satan," to the teens, whose actions were motivated by hatred.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
Mary Lynn Mattick began plotting her journey to the World Meeting of Families last winter. Mattick, who lives in Pewaukee, Wis., isn't mobile enough to be able to see Pope Francis say Mass on the Parkway on Sunday. And instead of wading into the crowd at Independence Mall for the pontiff's immigration speech Saturday, she'll hunker down in her hotel room on City Avenue and watch it on TV. But after a two-day train journey, she made it to the Convention Center on Wednesday, beaming at the thought that she was one of a crowd expected to swell to a million or more across the city - people who feel personally touched by Francis and the spirit he brings to the Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
June 3, 2015
A review Tuesday of the ABC Family show Stitchers mischaracterized the disease suffered by the main character. The show calls it "temporal dysplasia. " A story Sunday on the musician Brian Wilson mischaracterized the availability of the documentary The Wrecking Crew by Denny Tedesco. The complete DVD with special features will be released June 16. A story Sunday wrongly described Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput's role in the Catholic Church's World Youth Day in Denver in 1993.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Pope Francis' jet climbs above Philadelphia on the last Sunday of September and banks east for Rome, Archbishop Charles J. Chaput might allow himself a sigh of relief. The World Meeting of Families - three hectic years in the planning - will be over at last. The six-day international gathering, capped by Francis' visit, "keeps me awake at night," Chaput said in a recent interview. The huge event, expected to draw as many as two million people, is the latest in a litany of challenges to confront him since his arrival in September 2011.
NEWS
July 31, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
LAST WEEK, Pope Francis marked a triumphant return to South America by exhorting 30,000 young Catholics from his native Argentina to launch "a revolution" for God, to make "a mess" and "stir things up. " Yesterday, the 76-year-old pope took his own radical advice. Pope Francis shocked a planeful of reporters - and much of the planet - with his compassionate remarks about homosexual priests, saying: "If someone is gay and he searches for the Lord and has goodwill, who am I to judge?"
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield and Bradley Brooks, Associated Press
RIO DE JANEIRO - Pope Francis presided over one of the most solemn rites of the Catholic Church on Friday, a procession reenacting Christ's crucifixion in the improbable location of Rio's hedonistic Copacabana beach, as he headed into the home stretch of his first international trip for World Youth Day. The evening procession highlighted Francis' spiritual side a day after he showed off his rebel streak by calling on young Catholics to shake things up...
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | Associated Press
RIO DE JANEIRO - Pope Francis issued blunt, soul-searching criticism Saturday of the Brazilian church's failure to stem the "exodus" of Catholics to evangelical congregations, challenging the region's bishops to be closer to the people to understand their problems and persuade them that Catholicism is not "barren, fruitless soil. " In the longest and most important speech of his four-month pontificate, Francis drove home a message he has emphasized throughout his first international trip to World Youth Day: the need for Catholics, lay and religious, to shake up the status quo, get out of their stuffy sacristies, and reach the faithful on the margins of society or risk losing them to rival churches.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield, Marco Sibaja, and Jenny Barchfield, Associated Press
RIO DE JANEIRO - Pope Francis showed his rebel side Thursday, urging young Catholics to shake up the church and make a "mess" in their dioceses by going out into the streets to spread the faith. It's a message he put into practice by visiting one of Rio's most violent slums and opening the church's World Youth Day on a rain-soaked Copacabana Beach. Francis was elected pope on a mandate to reform the church, and in four months he has started doing just that: He has broken long-held Vatican rules on everything from where he lays his head at night to how saints are made.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield and Bradley Brooks, Associated Press
RIO DE JANEIRO - A wrong turn sent a humble Fiat carrying Pope Francis into the thick of a frenzied Rio crowd Monday, in his first minutes back in South America since becoming pontiff. It was a nightmare for security officials, but for the clearly delighted pope it was just another opportunity to connect. Ecstatic throngs forced his motorcade to repeatedly come to a standstill, weeks after violent protests against the government paralyzed parts of Brazil. Francis' driver had turned into the wrong side of a boulevard at one point, missing lanes that had been cleared.
NEWS
July 23, 2013 | By Jenny Barchfield and Bradley Brooks, Associated Press
RIO DE JANEIRO - Since taking the helm of the world's biggest church in March, Pope Francis has waded into massive crowds with minimal protection to hug children and wash the feet of the faithful. Yet for Brazilian security officials charged with protecting the 76-year-old pontiff with the common touch, his seven-day visit this week is an uncommon security challenge. In his first international trip as pope, Francis has built much of his schedule in the world's biggest Catholic country around high-profile events that send him straight into unpredictable, chaotic environments.
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