CollectionsWorld
IN THE NEWS

World

NEWS
March 11, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WILLIAM GUARNERE didn't have to go to war. At the time of the Pearl Harbor attack in 1941, he was building tanks at the old Baldwin Locomotive Works, a job considered crucial to the war effort and good for an exemption from military service. But Bill didn't take it. He enlisted in the Army paratroops on Aug. 31, 1942, and the rest is legend. "Wild Bill" Guarnere, the nickname he earned as a fearless combat soldier against the Germans, was a member of the legendary "Band of Brothers" - Easy Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division - celebrated in books and an HBO miniseries in 2001.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Let's skip the joke about how many engineers you need to screw in a lightbulb, and proceed to the step of just turning the darned thing on. Simple, right? Not at Drexel University. A ball drops down a steep ramp and triggers a catapult to launch a beanbag into a bucket suspended from a pulley, which drops down to set off a cascade of dominoes, which then nudges a metal ball into a cylinder, completing a circuit to - finally - turn on a light. So far, it is just a design on a screen, but by April 25, this contraption will be part of an outlandish, room-size attempt to break the record for the world's largest Rube Goldberg machine.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George E. Ehrlich, 85, of Philadelphia, an internationally renowned rheumatologist and adviser to the World Health Organization, died Friday, Feb. 28, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Arden Courts in King of Prussia. Dr. Ehrlich made his mark in Philadelphia as the director of rheumatology and chief of the Arthritis Center at Einstein Medical Center and Moss Rehabilitation Hospital from 1964 to 1980. But his influence went further. An international authority on rehabilitative management of rheumatic conditions, Dr. Ehrlich was trained in the post-World War II era, when the field of rheumatology was focused on discovering the cause of damage to the joints.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Frances Cohen Berlin would go to New York City to buy material for her family's variety stores, she could work a bargain, son Lawrence said. At wholesale firms selling gloves, the usual order might be for 100 dozen. "They would always give her a better price if she bought 20 dozen more," he said. And so she did. But she refused to bear the cost of shipping the goods home. "Where the buyer pays the freight," he said, "she would never pay the freight. " On Wednesday, Feb. 12, Mrs. Cohen, 98, of Atlantic City, a former owner with her husband, Robert, of a chain of Berlin and Berlin-Spillane variety stores, mostly in Montgomery County, died of pneumonia at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center in Atlantic City.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MARTY CHAVIS told his daughter that he would live to 100. Last Monday, he called his daughter from his home in Sarasota, Fla., and told her what a great time he had had at a friend's 100th birthday party. But the next day, Marty died. He was 91. Maybe Marty didn't fulfill his promise to his daughter, but he was everything a father should be, she said. "He was the best," his daughter, Debbie Rubin, said. "He was always there, with unconditional love. I was an only child, and he always encouraged me to achieve in whatever I undertook.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE The selection of noted climate scientist Eric J. Barron to lead Pennsylvania State University, a decision expected to be approved Monday by the trustees, reflects the importance of research to the university's future and its role as a jobs engine for the state, the executive director of the school's alumni association said Saturday. Roger L. Williams said he was delighted with reports that Barron would become Penn State's next president, ending a long search to replace Graham B. Spanier, who was forced out in 2011 over his handling of the Jerry Sandusky child-molestation scandal.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
BalletX took a chance adding a fourth series to its 2014 lineup: on the weather, on the 4 percent of Americans that even see ballet, and on world premieres by two young choreographers. The gamble paid off. Two pieces by Joshua L. Peugh kicked off the evening Tuesday. Slump playfully mocks gender differences in courting. Men in chinos and shirts strut to mambo music (one spits a handful of feathers!), women in ruffled cocktail dresses stomp their heels and turn away. In meandering movements, men take long, lazy lunges.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
M ARIEL ROJO, 26, of Burholme, is a fashion designer who recently launched a line of lingerie from a co-op on Arch Street near 3rd in Old City. Rojo, a native of Guadalajara, Mexico, graduated in 2011 from the Istituto Europeo di Design in Barcelona. She also studied at Philadelphia University and at Moore College of Art & Design. Rojo's lingerie can be found online by searching for her name. Q: How'd you decide to get into lingerie design? A: I liked lingerie when I was in school.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOCHI - Russia, a nation whose history and culture are as vast as its birch forests and grassy steppes, relied heavily on both Friday night, launching the 2014 Winter Olympics with an opening ceremony that was as ethereal as it was emotionally pleasing for the 40,000 spectators at Fisht Olympic Stadium. While President Vladimir Putin had hoped his country's first Winter Games would showcase the new Russia, it was instead its rich artistic past that dominated. The nearly three-hour spectacle igniting the most expensive Olympic Games ever, winter or summer, was infused by Tchaikovsky's music, by the ballet of the Bolshoi, and by the moody literature of Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MANY PEOPLE would have been happy with just a piece of Maytha Luberta Wright's work history. She was a well-known expert on color techniques for black women's hair, a restaurant hostess, a curriculum developer for a job program, operator of a security system for businesses, host of a religious radio program, world traveler and a dedicated minister teaching the Bible and preaching the word of the Lord. If that wasn't enough, she also raised two children and had grandchildren and great-grandchildren as a devoted family matriarch.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|