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NEWS
May 13, 2016
ISSUE | THREAT OF TERRORISM The cost of citizens being vigilant I have mixed emotions about the University of Pennsylvania economics professor who was temporarily removed from an American Airlines plane at Philadelphia International Airport after the passenger next to him thought he was a terrorist ("Wrong conclusion reached, and a flight is delayed," Sunday). While I would be annoyed if that were to happen to me, the professor's social media posts saying that "Trump's America is already here" and "Personally I will fight back" seem intended to stir controversy and further divide different ideologies.
NEWS
May 10, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The story's end is usually upbeat: A lifer proves he was wrongly convicted and savors freedom. Edward E. Stewart, 36, knows that story. He lived it. He served 10 years of a life term before he was acquitted at a new trial of a 2006 murder in a speakeasy he ran out of the basement of his Fern Rock house. On Dec. 3, a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury cleared him in 1 hour and 38 minutes - two hours less than it took the first jury to convict. He walked out of the Criminal Justice Center without a dime, still wearing his prison-issue blue pants and T-shirt.
NEWS
May 2, 2016
Paul Halpern is a University of the Sciences physics professor and the author of "Einstein's Dice and Schrödinger's Cat: How Two Great Minds Battled Quantum Randomness to Create a Unified Theory of Physics" One of the stunning breakthroughs of the 21st century is the ability to share massive amounts of information instantaneously, virtually anywhere around the world. Communication is no longer confined to particular locations or times. A boy in Malaysia can play chess with a girl in Brazil while posting on Facebook, based in the United States, and commenting on a Reddit thread started in the United Kingdom.
NEWS
April 29, 2016
By Cindy Skrzycki I was at a table of 20 or so family and friends for the first night of Passover. There were the traditional, beloved prayers, blessings, and thanks for liberation. The bitter and the sweet. The communal seder. I am no stranger to this: It was probably my 35th year at a seder table. My daughter, a first-year rabbinic student, is in Crimea, where she is a stranger and can't communicate without a translator. But, with another Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion classmate, she helped conduct seders for Jewish communities in Crimea.
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Ellen Dunkel, STAFF WRITER
Change is constant in the dance world. But the suddenness and scope of the roster changes announced Monday for Pennsylvania Ballet stunned many in that world and out of it. Angel Corella, the company's artistic director and an international ballet superstar, said 17 of 43 dancers - nearly 40 percent - would be leaving the company. Twelve were let go and five are leaving on their own, including favorites such as Lauren Fadeley, who is going to to Miami City Ballet as a soloist; and Elizabeth Mateer, who will be joining the corps of the San Francisco Ballet.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Quaker City Night Hawks. Don't let the band name fool you: This quartet that specializes in raucous rock and blues hails not from Philadelphia but Fort Worth, Texas, which explains its affinity for the guitar boogie of Lone Star State beardos ZZ Top. Sunday at Dawson Street Pub. "Fela Ransome Kuti and His Koola Lobitos. " This three-disc set on the Partisan label traces the early career of the Nigerian Afrobeat founder, when he returned to Lagos from music school in London in the 1960s and fronted a freewheeling band while playing trumpet, not saxophone.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
It's one of those wouldn't-it-be-cool type of ideas that usually comes around the third beer. A Philly World Cup soccer tournament. Just like the real World Cup, with 32 teams and squads from across the city representing different countries. Citywide elimination games, and a championship game and festival at Citizens Bank Park. A way to bring neighborhoods together. To make the city feel a little smaller, a little tighter. It could become a tradition - with bragging rights all year.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
The Other Slavery The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in America By Andrés Reséndez Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 431 pp. $30 Reviewed by Peter Lewis Farmer X lived close by our house. Late Sunday night, he'd drive to town, bail 10 blotto men out of the drunk tank, and truck them to the farm. Next morning, oh, boy, were those men surprised. It took them about 10 days to pay off Farmer X: long hours, squalid housing, painful encounters with yellow jackets.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
The Waters of Eternal Youth By Donna Leon Atlantic Monthly Press. 304 pp. $26. Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer A fter a quarter-century, Donna Leon and the readers of her Commissario Guido Brunetti mystery series have settled into a comfortable relationship, much like her fictional detective and his wife, Paola. Leon's writing satisfies, much like the dishes that come out of Paola's kitchen. It goes down easily. Her characters are reassuringly familiar and likable, if a little too good to be true.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
Camden County Clerk Joseph Ripa dipped his hand into a worn wooden box and slowly pulled out the names of five campaign slogans associated with the presidential, congressional, and county government candidates who will run together on slates in New Jersey's June 7 primary. The random drawing, conducted with both drama and a touch of humor in front of a dozen spectators Friday afternoon, settled the testy jockeying for ballot positions. It also ended the potential of a second court challenge by newcomer Alex Law, who is vying to unseat Donald Norcross, in a heated Democratic primary battle for a seat in the First Congressional District.
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