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NEWS
April 13, 2001 | by Ron Goldwyn Daily News Staff Writer
Sharon Baptist Church's stunning new 8.5-acre worship center in Wynnefield, the site of filled-to-capacity services for its initial Easter a year ago, will sit idle this Sunday. Enon Tabernacle Baptist's snug 800-seat space in Germantown won't have to feel the crush of spillover crowds. Instead, two of the city's largest Baptist congregations will join for worship at 10 a.m. at an unusual venue: Temple University's Liacouras Center. They expect to fill all 10,000 or so seats in one of the largest Resurrection Sunday services ever conducted in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 5, 1986 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The remnants of the nationwide counterculture celebrated its beliefs among the curious and the uncommitted in a forest clearing here yesterday with a noon-hour worship of often naked silence. A bare-breasted woman stood in the midst of 7,000 people sitting on the grass, held high three feathers, and then turned to the four corners of the earth, again and again, leading the worship of nature in silence. A naked young man took her place, then a young woman in a long-sleeved white dress, then others.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Eighty-six - count 'em, 86 - ministries keep the Mt. Airy Church of God in Christ an exuberant house of the Lord, especially for young people and especially at Easter. On Palm Sunday, the drum and bugle corps ministry paraded down the main aisle. This week, the drama ministry is providing the climax for the Easter season with a three-night passion play in gospel rhythms. "If a church is going to be viable in reaching young people, you've got to have a level of excitement," said Bishop Ernest Morris as he viewed a rehearsal from the balcony of his new sanctuary at 6401 Ogontz Ave. "Especially with young people, you've got to do more than preach sermons and sing songs.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | By Marie Green, Special to The Inquirer
The Quaker meeting for worship begins without hymns, spoken prayers or announcements - just silence, the kind of thoughtful quiet that not even a bird's song or a toddler's whisper can penetrate. "Sometimes," said Randy Lyons, a member of the Religious Society of Friends, also known as Quakers, "the most rewarding meeting is one where nobody says a word. You come away, and everyone knows it's been a special meeting. " The low-key approach to worship reflects the lifestyle of the Quakers, 3,000 of whom live in Chester County.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1989 | By Michael W. Martin, Special to The Inquirer
Easter arrives this year in tandem with the very beginning of spring. This weekend, many houses of worship are the essence of simplicity; stripped of adornment, they await the arrival of Easter. Others are wearing their holiday finery: flowers, bright colors and a fresh scrubbing. So get out a comfortable pair of walking shoes, because in Philadelphia we are particularly blessed with historic houses of worship that have lasted through the decades and continue to hold active congregations.
NEWS
February 1, 1992 | by Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
They died pretty much the way they lived - hard and uneasy. Their lives had been full of strenuous work and burdens too heavy to weigh. Some were ex-slaves. All were members of the First African Baptist Church. They were buried between 1810 and 1842 in the church's cemeteries at 8th and Vine and 10th and Vine. Incredibly, though, some of the old-time members have yet to find a final resting place. Ninety-seven still are housed in the offices of John Milner Associates, an architectural and archaeological consulting firm studying the members' remains in hopes of discovering more about these 19th-century African-Americans.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
Although they are all gone, buried in a graveyard a mile away, the founders of the 165-year-old Mount Moriah A.M.E. Church in Mount Holly are very much alive to James B. Irby. Each time he enters the Washington Street house of worship, he said he feels their warmth and spirit emanating from the old wooden pews and the bright stained-glass windows. "I believe there is a sweet spirit and a magic love that has kept this church going for 165 years," said Irby, church historian and superintendent of the Sunday school.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | By Eileen Kenna, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Donna Echols, her bare feet making no sound, moves expressively to the music. At first, she moves slowly, her arms open wide to the heavens. But as the tempo picks up and the drums begin beating, she twirls and leaps. Her face, a study in peaceful contemplation, provides a marked contrast to her quick, gracefully moving body. She ends the dance on her knees, hands clasped, as if in prayer. When Echols dances, she is praying. The art form is called liturgical dance, and last Sunday Echols demonstrated for an appreciative congregation at St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Hatboro.
SPORTS
October 20, 2010
Ryan Howard said he might call Barry Bonds to "see what's going on" or "talk some trash, maybe. " The Giants organization had the disgraced slugger throw out the first pitch Tuesday.  Anyone else think it's odd that, of all the players in Giants history, they chose to honor Bonds before Game 3? That's some serious trash Howard could talk. "Hey, Barry, your head keeps getting smaller, what's that all about? . . . Barry, is it true HGH doesn't work in the postseason? . . . Explain to me again the difference between a grand slam and a grand jury.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1994 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER
If the thing you don't like about most church services is that they just don't have enough drum solos, or that hardly anybody ever says "cool daddy," then check out the righteous jams going down Sunday at jazz vespers. Old Pine Street Presbyterian Church conducts this unusual worship service the third Sunday of every month, promptly at 5 p.m. There are no cover charge, no ID check and no drink minimum (of course, there are no drinks, either). It's open to everyone and, if you're willing to take a pass on the collection plate, it's absolutely free.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | Becky Batcha, Daily News Staff Writer batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
  Like Hillary Clinton, but minus the Chipotle stop, the Rev. Rodger Broadley has been hitting the road on a listening tour. In his case, the itinerary covers the Episcopal Church USA's five-county Delaware Valley diocese. As co-chairman of the denomination's Bishop Search Committee, the Center City cleric is riding the church circuit to hold a series of "Holy Conversations" with parishioners that pose this question: "What gifts and experiences should our new bishop have?"
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
ST. NICHOLAS of Tolentine Parish has something that no other church in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia has: a weekly Sunday Mass conducted in Italian. The 8 a.m. Mass helps some congregants connect with their Italian heritage, said the Rev. Nicholas F. Martorano, pastor of St. Nicholas since 1984. "They like the tradition. They want to keep the language. They just enjoy being able to celebrate the Mass with the Italian language even though they speak English," Martorano said.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IF THERE'S one congregation in the city that's embraced evolution, it's Greater St. Matthew Baptist Church. St. Matthew's dedicated worshippers have followed it across three locations in the past 15 years, adapting to new surroundings after each move. Naturally, said the pastor, Rev. Steven Avinger, those transitions required some work. Who we are: Avinger's flock numbers just over 400, he said, mostly adults in the 35- to 40-year-old range, who bring their young families with them from across the city to Sunday services.
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
AMONG THE central tenets of Judaism is Tikkun Olam , a Hebrew phrase that means "repairing the world. " For the folks at Congregation Rodeph Shalom in Spring Garden, it is a driving force. A food desert in North Philly? They opened a weekly farmers' market to assure that residents can get fresh produce. Racial unrest sweeping the nation? They are hosting a "Race in America" community conversation. Bigots citing religion to discriminate against gays? They revel in diversity and woo worshippers of all sexual orientations - and all faiths and races - to their services.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
ON A CORNER in West Philly, assorted nonprofits are pushing the envelope on what it means to share a space. The Calvary Center for Culture and Community, on 48th Street near Baltimore Avenue, combines the performing arts, community services and religion (four of them, actually) in a single, three-story building. Rich Kirk, the president of the center's board, says Calvary has come a long way from its humble origins as a Methodist church on the brink of closing. Who we are: The center was formed in 2000 and has housed a wide variety of tenants in its 14 years, Kirk said.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | BY NATALIE POMPILIO, natalie@nataliepompilio.com
THERE IS no "typical" Shabbat service at Society Hill Synagogue. One week, Rabbi Avi Winokur might include the works of Sufi mystics and Muslim spiritual giants. The next might feature writings by Christian leaders, noted intellectuals or Jewish religious thinkers. One way the synagogue describes its open approach is by citing an old joke: "Two Jews, three opinions. " That is to say, different people celebrate their faith in different ways. "It's very eclectic," said Winokur, who has led the congregation for 13 years.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Citing high upkeep costs, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced Sunday that it had closed Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament Church in West Philadelphia on Friday. In January 2013, Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament Parish merged with St. Cyprian Parish. Most services were held in St. Cyprian Church, 525 Cobbs Creek Parkway. Blessed Sacrament, at 63d and Callowhill Streets, was an "alternate worship site" that hosted occasional Masses, funerals, weddings, and baptisms, archdiocese spokesman Kenneth Gavin said.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AS AREA FAMILIES lather on the sunscreen, pack up the car and head down the Shore, one consideration that isn't always made is where the beach bums will go for spiritual guidance on Sunday. But St. Brendan the Navigator - a Catholic institution that's had various incarnations for more than 100 years - has cornered the market for summertime worship on Seven Mile Island (shared by Avalon and Stone Harbor), according to Joanne Schwarzwalder, the parish business administrator. Who we are: "A seashore parish isn't much different from a parish in the city or suburbs," Schwarzwalder said.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | BY BECKY BATCHA, Daily News Staff Writer batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
BUX-MONT'S landmark Bryn Athyn Cathedral looms large in its community - 180 feet large, measuring to the top of its tallest tower. Inside, the view from the pews is awe-inspiring. Artisans built the place just after the turn of the 20th century to resemble Europe's great medieval churches, down to blowing their own stained glass on site. Outside, the view overlooking the Pennypack Creek Valley from the vast, terraced grounds is breathtaking. But the church's congregation is as ordinary as they come: a button-downed collection of women in sensible, pretty dresses, men in jackets and slacks, and very well-scrubbed college students from Bryn Athyn College across the street.
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