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Wreath

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NEWS
December 21, 1993 | By MARK RANDALL
Goodwill toward men notwithstanding, one notes the near impossibility of getting through the holiday season on only one wreath. One steps out full of hope and pleasure to deck the door, only to find the sentiments swept away, along with the wreath, by the local filchers. However trivial, these pilferings sour the spirit. You slog out to buy and then hang another wreath, but by now the original hope and pleasure have given way to musings less befitting the season, such as for example, how to thwart the next s.o.b.
FOOD
November 29, 1989 | By Phyllis Stein-Novack, Special to the Daily News
Handmade gifts are as special as Christmas. And now's the time to begin making decorative holiday wreaths with your own personal touch. It's easier than you think. Standard wreath forms are either 12, 16 or 18 inches in diameter. After you decide on the size you wish to make, it's only a matter of gathering the materials you need to decorate it. Wreath forms can be purchased at florist shops, craft stores and garden nurseries. "It's best to buy ready-made forms of straw or grapevine rather than buying branches and twisting them into shape because it saves time," says Chuck Hills, owner of Holmes Colonial Florist in Media.
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
A circle wreath of red, white and blue carnations arrived at the war memorial bearing a simple message: "We Remember. " And so it was yesterday, Veterans Day, a day to remember the men and women who have served in the U.S. armed forces. About a hundred people attended a ceremony at the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial yesterday morning, and dozens more visited the stone monument throughout the day. Some brought bouquets and flags to lay beneath the inscriptions. Others brought only memories of the relatives and friends who were among the 641 Philadelphians killed in Vietnam.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christmas wreaths have put Del Westwood into a sweat. The weekend after Thanksgiving weekend is usually high time, he says, for folks to begin to drive into the country to buy his Christmas decorations. A wreath of evergreen branches for the front door. A rope of evergreen branches for the office wall. But yesterday in the region, Maytime sweat was blossoming more than December sentiment. "It's so hot that people come in and say it don't even feel like Christmas" and walk out without buying, Westwood said yesterday at the garden center he owns on Route 926 in Chester County, north of Chadds Ford.
NEWS
October 1, 2012
DEAR ABBY: My sister and I take turns (a few days at a time) caring for our 91-year-old mother. I went to her place for July Fourth, and before returning home, I took flowers to the family cemetery, which is close to Mom's house. It's something I do every year. I took wreaths I had made for each of my grandparents, an uncle, my precious son (who died at 5) and my dear sister who was recently laid to rest. Each wreath was unique - I had carefully chosen favorite flowers. Even though the wreaths were artificial, they were pretty, and I felt proud to display them on the graves of my loved ones.
LIVING
November 21, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eileen Boyle takes a bird's-eye view of the fall garden. She sees it as a bountiful buffet of fruits, nuts and seeds. She won't eat them herself. She'll use them, along with dried apricots and apples, popcorn and Cheerios, to make a holiday wreath that's a treat for birds and a delight for people who like to watch them. "You'll have birds till February. It's so cool," says Boyle, education coordinator at the nonprofit Mount Cuba Center near Wilmington, which studies and celebrates regional native plants and wildflowers.
LIVING
December 5, 1997 | By Elaine Markoutsas, FOR THE INQUIRER
Of all the decorations of Christmas, nothing is more welcoming than a wreath. A simple, traditional evergreen wreath decorated with a bow and hung on the front door hints to visitors of the warmth inside. "In many climates, Christmas is a time when vegetation is dormant," Carol Endler Sterbenz, editor of Handcraft Illustrated, pointed out. "Evergreens bring aliveness and the promise of growing things into seasonal decorations. Besides, wreaths are a way of celebrating life. " And making your own wreath or garland enhances the meaning of the decoration.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For Christians, the season of Advent is a time of reflection and anticipation of Christmas. One tradition is the Advent wreath, made of evergreens encircling four candles - three violet and one rose. During the four weeks before the holiday, wreaths are placed on altars of churches and a candle is lit every Sunday - first the violet and then the rose - until Christmas arrives. Sister Alice Edward, associate for pastoral services at Mother of Divine Providence Catholic Church in King of Prussia, had an idea to broaden the tradition by inviting families to make Advent wreaths for their homes.
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | By Lubna Khan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Wreaths have become a symbol of the holiday spirit Christmas enthusiasts love. But for the next month, Mothers Against Drunk Driving want them to be a reminder that a little too much spirit can take a life. To make the point, MADD placed a giant Christmas wreath on the door to the Delaware County Courthouse during a candlelight vigil yesterday. The vigil brought together more than 100 loved ones of victims of drunken driving in Delaware and Chester Counties. Sheltering their candles from the breeze, the marchers filed from the First United Methodist Church to the courthouse steps.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Gregory Katz and Shawn Pogatchnik, Associated Press
DUBLIN, Ireland - Sometimes words aren't necessary. That was the case Tuesday when Queen Elizabeth II placed a wreath in Dublin's Garden of Remembrance to honor the Irish rebels who lost their lives fighting for freedom from Britain. The queen became the first British monarch to set foot in Dublin for a century. Her four-day visit is designed to show that the bitter enmity of Ireland's war of independence 90 years ago has been replaced by Anglo-Irish friendship and that peace has become irreversible in the neighboring British territory of Northern Ireland.
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NEWS
May 27, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
WHEN IT was his time to speak, "Edward (Ned) Hector," dressed in his American Revolutionary military uniform, walked toward the podium to address the people gathered at Washington Square for a Memorial Day commemoration. "I'll bet you're wondering what this black man is doing dressed in this uniform," Noah Lewis, a professional re-enactor portraying the Revolutionary War bombardier, told the crowd of fewer than 100 people yesterday. He went on to tell them that between 3,000 and 5,000 black troops fought for the Continental Army while another 7,000 to 10,000 fought for the British after the British promised enslaved men in the South their freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Succulent plants - things like agaves, aloes, and sempervivums, known as "semps" - are glamorous and unfussy, with a distinctly 21st-century plus: They can survive periods of drought by storing water and nutrients in their fleshy leaves and stems. That quality alone makes them a darling on the rain-starved West Coast and increasingly popular with environmentally thoughtful gardeners elsewhere. But succulents, especially the perennial "semps," are prized for another reason: They're cool!
REAL_ESTATE
December 22, 2013 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
At Christmastime, from the moment you step onto Angela Sandone-Barr and Bill Barr's property in Riverton, N.J., the enchantment begins. Nestled on the wooded lot are three dancing reindeer adorned with twinkling lights, greeting callers as they wind down the country driveway. Wreaths and white candles in every window illuminate the brown house that sits at the edge of a bird sanctuary. That warm spirit radiates inside, not only from the fires that burn frequently in the fireplaces, but also from a couple who lovingly celebrate the joys of Christmas with family and friends.
NEWS
October 1, 2012
DEAR ABBY: My sister and I take turns (a few days at a time) caring for our 91-year-old mother. I went to her place for July Fourth, and before returning home, I took flowers to the family cemetery, which is close to Mom's house. It's something I do every year. I took wreaths I had made for each of my grandparents, an uncle, my precious son (who died at 5) and my dear sister who was recently laid to rest. Each wreath was unique - I had carefully chosen favorite flowers. Even though the wreaths were artificial, they were pretty, and I felt proud to display them on the graves of my loved ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2012 | By Eva Monheim, Inquirer Columnist
Rest and read. It may be too hot to read out in the garden, but here's a good book for the screened porch: Amy Stewart's Wicked Bugs , which I just finished. It's a fascinating look at creatures that have affected man over the course of history, and the author's chilling stories made me realize how vulnerable we are if we don't understand the world around us. Stewart recommends many websites at the end of her book, such as Pesticide Action Network North America's www.panna.org , which suggests alternatives to pesticides.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Eva Monheim, Inquirer Columnist
Prune hydrangeas, especially mopheads. Mopheads ( Hydrangea macrophylla ) typically have waxy, cabbagelike leaves and are the most colorful of all hydrangeas. (Other species are usually white.) You can prune them back to about two feet, cutting just above two buds that are emerging on the stem. Typically, mopheads bloom on old wood, so you want to leave enough of last year's buds on the stem to provide blooms for this year. If you're not sure what type of hydrangea you have, go to hydrangeashydrangeas.com.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Faith R. Foyil, For The Inquirer
I once assumed that the word seasonal referred only to part-time employment, persistent allergies, and mood disorders. I didn't realize the word could apply to Bucks County front-door wreaths that were supposed to be rotated faster than you could say "Center hall Colonial. " Wreaths achieved stardom back in Greco-Roman times, when winners of sporting events were crowned with laurel or oak-leaf wreaths. A few centuries later, a practical decathlon champion realized that the prickly foliage looked, and actually felt, a lot better if you hung it on a door instead of around your forehead.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2011
OUR PERSONS in uniform deserve all the recognition we can give them today - from solemn wreath-laying ceremonies to serious discounts. Battleship New Jersey A morning ceremony on the forecastle includes the casting of a wreath into the Delaware and the firing of a portside gun. Battleship New Jersey, 62 Battleship Place, 10 a.m., free, 215-923-0210 or 800-298-4200, www.battleshipnj.org . Seaport Museum Outside the Becuna,...
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Gregory Katz and Shawn Pogatchnik, Associated Press
DUBLIN, Ireland - Sometimes words aren't necessary. That was the case Tuesday when Queen Elizabeth II placed a wreath in Dublin's Garden of Remembrance to honor the Irish rebels who lost their lives fighting for freedom from Britain. The queen became the first British monarch to set foot in Dublin for a century. Her four-day visit is designed to show that the bitter enmity of Ireland's war of independence 90 years ago has been replaced by Anglo-Irish friendship and that peace has become irreversible in the neighboring British territory of Northern Ireland.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Tim Huber, Associated Press
CHARLESTON, W. Va. - Church bells pealed across West Virginia for 29 fallen coal miners as countless tears fell Tuesday and dozens of coal mines stood silent at 3 p.m., roughly the moment when a powerful blast tore through the Upper Big Branch Mine one year ago. Massey Energy Co., owner of the vast underground mine where the men died in the worst coalfield disaster since 1970, halted production at mines in West Virginia, Virginia, and Kentucky....
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