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Wrestlemania

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1990 | By Alan Raskin, Special to The Inquirer
WrestleMania 6, hyped as the Super Bowl of professional wrestling, will unfold Sunday at the SkyDome in Toronto and will send thousands of people from this area into giant-screen closed-circuit theaters to witness the head- banging, toe-crushing, appendage-smacking, body-bashing, fist-pounding, torso-throwing, hair-pulling and nose-tweaking action. This will be the first WrestleMania since the deregulation of wrestling, meaning that the World Wrestling Federation will use its own officials, timekeepers and ring doctors and will script and rehearse most matches, the winners being predetermined - exhibitions without actual athletic competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1989 | By Alan Raskin, Special to The Inquirer
In its first four years of existence, Wrestlemania has broken closed- circuit and pay-TV records, and the hype surrounding the event appears to have exploded as well. By the looks of it, this weekend's fifth edition, at the Trump Plaza Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City, will be as popular an event as ever. Only limited seating, at $150 per, remains. So if you don't already have one of the 21,000 tickets, the best way to take in the 14 matches is either by pay TV or at one of the five humongous-screen closed-circuit locations in the region.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WrestleMania fever hit hard, and early, in Philadelphia this weekend. Tickets to tonight's event at the First Union Center have been sold out for months. WrestleMania participants - call them "superstars," the World Wrestling Federation asks - have been hyping it for weeks, everywhere from national call-in sports-radio shows to late-night TV. The live show, the Convention Center party, the personal appearances by the Rock and Paul "the Big Show" Wight, the Home Shopping Network extravaganza were all set. Fans streamed into the city from across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1991 | By Alan Raskin, Special to The Inquirer
Pow! Bash! Slam! Those will be the sounds echoing across the country on Sunday, when the World Wrestling Federation presents Wrestlemania 7, live from the Los Angeles Sports Arena. The most controversial Wrestlemania ever pits WWF champion Sergeant Slaughter against the immortal Hulk Hogan in the main event. Slaughter, a former Marine drill instructor, voiced his support for Iraq during the Persian Gulf War and burned a Hulk Hogan shirt and a Hulk Hogan poster on national TV. Hogan, playing the All-American hero, has vowed to bring down Slaughter as a Patriot missile would a Scud.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Jesse Ventura, former pro wrestler and now governor of Minnesota, said yesterday the death of longtime wrestling icon Gorilla Monsoon saddened him deeply. "He was both a friend and a colleague and I have many fond memories of the time we spent together," he said. "He will be missed. " Monsoon, 62, who lived in Willingboro, N.J., died early Wednesday of complications of diabetes and a recent heart attack. He and Ventura teamed up as wrestling commentators after they retired from the ring.
SPORTS
May 28, 1987 | By LES BOWEN, Daily News Sports Writer
Tonight, tonight, tonight, Phil Collins and Genesis are at Veterans Stadium and the Flyers and the Oilers are at the Spectrum. What this means is traffic. That is why game time has been pushed back to 8:05, in hopes that the Genesis throng will be in place for the scheduled 7:30 start of that event. Never mind that only nerds show up on time for rock concerts. Extra parking is available across Broad Street at Roosevelt Park, and the Spectrum doors will open at 6 p.m., in case you're dying to kill two hours sitting in the Spectrum.
NEWS
November 27, 1991 | By Andy Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Sumner Bullock, 34, a 6-foot-3, 200-pound black belt in karate who loved basketball, top-of-the-line stereo equipment and long weekend drives in his red Mustang GT, died Saturday at Hahnemann University Hospital. Death was sudden and unexpected. He had undergone an apparently successful liver transplant in the Cleveland Clinic in August that had brought him out of a coma and back to the brink of good health. Recuperating last week at Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, he had been able to walk on his own and was looking forward to going home on a 12-hour pass for Thanksgiving.
NEWS
April 12, 2000
More on Lindros Eric Lindros is for Eric Lindros. When he wants to play, he can dominate a game; unfortunately, most of the season, he's either giving less than half an effort or he's out for ailments or injuries. If Lindros went all out, the Flyers would be Stanley Cup champions. But he doesn't give a damn. I'm sure it bothers Bob Clarke, a Flyer through and through, to see a talented player like Lindros play hard only when he wants to, then have to pay him hundreds of thousands of dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1995 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
First, the boos rained down. Then came the chants of "Bulls-! Bulls-! Bulls-!" Then, the deafening roar "Refund! Refund!" filled Al's Diamond Cabaret strip joint. But it wasn't until the first beer can flew on stage, after the crowd's anger had turned to outright rage, that the bouncers vaulted the railing to kick some serious behind. Had it actually come to this for LaToya Jackson, the sultry, fawn-like vixen who also happens to be an embarrassment to her famous show-business family?
SPORTS
April 8, 1989 | By Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
There is absolutely no way the Major Indoor Lacrosse League could have written a better ending to its third season. To ask for anything more would have been asking too much. Of course, the true beauty of it all was that there wasn't any script. Fans of Wrestlemania take note: The MILL might not be major league, but it is nothing if not a legitimate effort. And so it was that the team that has consistently drawn the most support, the Wings, defeated the club that was considered the one to beat all along, the defending champion New York Saints, last night at the Spectrum, 11-10.
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NEWS
April 12, 2000
More on Lindros Eric Lindros is for Eric Lindros. When he wants to play, he can dominate a game; unfortunately, most of the season, he's either giving less than half an effort or he's out for ailments or injuries. If Lindros went all out, the Flyers would be Stanley Cup champions. But he doesn't give a damn. I'm sure it bothers Bob Clarke, a Flyer through and through, to see a talented player like Lindros play hard only when he wants to, then have to pay him hundreds of thousands of dollars.
SPORTS
April 5, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Pete Rose's appearance in Sunday's Wrestlemania 2000 came the day after his mother died, it was disclosed yesterday. Laverne Noeth died at 84 on Saturday at Dearborn County Hospital in Lawrenceburg, Ind., where she had been visiting a daughter. The hospital yesterday would not disclose the cause of death. Noeth had lived for years in central Florida but returned to Cincinnati in recent years. Apart from Rose, baseball's career hits leader, Noeth is survived by son David Rose, daughters Jacqueline Schwier and Caryl Schnebelt, 18 grandchildren, 21 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Jesse Ventura, former pro wrestler and now governor of Minnesota, said yesterday the death of longtime wrestling icon Gorilla Monsoon saddened him deeply. "He was both a friend and a colleague and I have many fond memories of the time we spent together," he said. "He will be missed. " Monsoon, 62, who lived in Willingboro, N.J., died early Wednesday of complications of diabetes and a recent heart attack. He and Ventura teamed up as wrestling commentators after they retired from the ring.
LIVING
March 30, 1999 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WrestleMania XV ended the way it had to, the way any good populist fairy tale must: with workingman hero Stone Cold Steve Austin the new World Wrestling Federation champion, with the 20,000 fans who'd packed the First Union Center on their feet, and with WWF owner and Corporation bad guy Mr. McMahon on his knees and covered in Coors Light. Along the way, there were the requisite helpings of blood and gore and bad language, Satanic symbols, broken tables, broken chairs, fireworks, men the size of SUV's and women the shape of Barbie dolls.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WrestleMania fever hit hard, and early, in Philadelphia this weekend. Tickets to tonight's event at the First Union Center have been sold out for months. WrestleMania participants - call them "superstars," the World Wrestling Federation asks - have been hyping it for weeks, everywhere from national call-in sports-radio shows to late-night TV. The live show, the Convention Center party, the personal appearances by the Rock and Paul "the Big Show" Wight, the Home Shopping Network extravaganza were all set. Fans streamed into the city from across the country.
NEWS
March 27, 1999 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you see a lot of half-clad men and buxom women wandering around town this weekend wearing leather headgear or gold wigs, don't be alarmed. It's only WrestleMania XV, the biggest, baddest, bawdiest show in the sports entertainment world ("sports entertainment," by the way, is the World Wrestling Federation's preferred term), which arrives in Philadelphia this weekend for the first time. The two-day juggernaut will feature guest appearances, a televised party with tickets selling briskly at $80 a pop, live music, a Home Shopping Network special and - oh, yeah - some wrestling, too. The main event takes place tomorrow night at the First Union Center and will culminate in the "raging climax" (again, the federation's term)
SPORTS
February 6, 1998 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
In Rod Serling's classic "Requiem for a Heavyweight," the ultimate degradation for faded boxer Mountain McClintock was to allow himself to be manipulated into pro wrestling by his shady manager. It seems that, with no legitimate fights to be fought, McClintock had nothing to trade upon but the tattered remnants of his good name. These days, degradation pays substantially better. But no matter how large the paycheck he will receive, the sight of once-great former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson serving as a celebrity foil for World Wrestling Federation headliners "Stone Cold" Steve Austin and Shawn Michaels should be no less depressing to boxing fans than that of the humiliated McClintock tugging on tights and going out to play-grapple with some Masked Marvel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1995 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
First, the boos rained down. Then came the chants of "Bulls-! Bulls-! Bulls-!" Then, the deafening roar "Refund! Refund!" filled Al's Diamond Cabaret strip joint. But it wasn't until the first beer can flew on stage, after the crowd's anger had turned to outright rage, that the bouncers vaulted the railing to kick some serious behind. Had it actually come to this for LaToya Jackson, the sultry, fawn-like vixen who also happens to be an embarrassment to her famous show-business family?
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | By Bill Doherty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Delaware County Coaches Association knew something had to be done to stop the fighting that turned last year's Hero Bowl game, which is supposed to be a charity game, into a Wrestlemania event. Their solution? A joint practice that will be held this evening at the Glen Mills School. Their hope is that familiarity will breed content, not contempt. In other words, the coaches' thinking is that if the players spend some time together and get to know each other tonight, then tommorow's 16th annual Hero Bowl will go off without a hitch.
NEWS
November 27, 1991 | By Andy Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Sumner Bullock, 34, a 6-foot-3, 200-pound black belt in karate who loved basketball, top-of-the-line stereo equipment and long weekend drives in his red Mustang GT, died Saturday at Hahnemann University Hospital. Death was sudden and unexpected. He had undergone an apparently successful liver transplant in the Cleveland Clinic in August that had brought him out of a coma and back to the brink of good health. Recuperating last week at Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, he had been able to walk on his own and was looking forward to going home on a 12-hour pass for Thanksgiving.
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