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Wright Brothers

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NEWS
December 14, 1998 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hidden in a basement vault of the Franklin Institute and tucked away in a climate-controlled chamber in its attic are the documents and tools Wilbur and Orville Wright used to figure out how to fly. The public has never seen the institute's Wright Brothers' Aeronautical Engineering Collection, because the science museum has lacked the facilities to display the papers and artifacts properly. As a result, access has been limited to scholars who knew the material was in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
February 2, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two crossed bats and the words "The Father of Baseball" are inscribed on the marble pedestal at West Laurel Hill Cemetery that supports a 6-foot-6 bronze likeness of Harry Wright. Several hundred miles from that Bala Cynwyd hillside, in Middlesex, Mass., the simple headstone marking the final resting place of Wright's younger brother, George, notes merely his name and life span. Though considerable gaps in taste and distance separate their grave sites, the Wrights remain an unbreakable tandem in baseball history.
NEWS
December 18, 2003 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Wait till next century. Proving the extraordinary nature of the Wright Brothers' accomplishment 100 years ago yesterday, man failed to replicate their signal flight above the sands of the Outer Banks that heralded the dawn of aviation. The Wright Experience team from Warrenton, Va., twice attempted to get a precise, $1.2 million reproduction of the 1903 Wright Flyer off the rain-sodden ground to cap a six-day celebration. An initial try, delayed by weather from a planned 10:35 a.m. start to mark the actual centennial, ended after the nose slightly lifted but the craft slid down into the muck.
NEWS
June 2, 1993 | For The Inquirer / TOM MIHALEK
If we throw him hard enough, he might land in Europe. Test flight at the Shore? No, just an exercise to instill trust among lifeguards at the Seapointe Village, Mariners Landing/Raging Waters amusement pier in Wildwood Crest. The Wright Brothers didn't get started this way.
NEWS
January 11, 2004 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Camden County Vocational School in Pennsauken - which now has a second campus and is called the Camden County Technical Schools District - recently celebrated its 75th year, reflecting upon a storied past. Not only did thousands of men and women learn manufacturing there during World War II, but its students also restored the Wright Brothers plane that hangs in the Franklin Institute. The Model B Flyer Thirty years after the Wright Brothers flew the world's first airplane on windswept dunes in Kitty Hawk, N.C., Orville Wright found himself at Camden County Vocational School surrounded by eager Aero Mechanics students.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Dressed in a cap, raincoat, white shirt and tie, Henry Ford watched with pride as the children piled into his quadricycle. Giggling, they rode around waving to friends and enjoying the sites at the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair. "We built the car on an assembly line right here," said Ford - better known as third-grade teacher Jack Briggs - as he gestured around the gym at the Friends Central lower school. "Everyone had a job to do. " Sounding like a proud inventor, David Bernstein, who was dressed like Ford, said he helped paint the quadricycle and worked on its steering.
NEWS
May 16, 2003 | By Dominic Sama FOR THE INQUIRER
A U.S. 37-cent commemorative will recall the centennial of the Wright Brothers' first controlled, powered-sustained flight in a heavier-than-air flying machine. Often forgotten in the historic event is a postmaster whose connections helped accommodate the brothers in their experiments. The stamp, which will be issued Thursday, honors Wilbur Wright (1867-1912) and his brother Orville (1871-1948), who actually made the flight. In the background was Bill Tate, the first postmaster of Kitty Hawk, N.C., who also was a notary public and county commissioner.
NEWS
December 18, 2002 | Daily News wire services
U.S. prepares to celebrate 100th anniversary of flight The 100th anniversary of the Wright brothers' first flight is a year away, and astronauts and relatives of the aviation pioneers yesterday outlined a yearlong series of events to commemorate the bicycle makers' history-altering feat. "The last 100 years have been absolutely amazing, but that's only a precursor to what can be," former astronaut John Glenn told a group that included survivors of Charles Lindbergh and the Ohio brothers, Orville and Wilbur Wright at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. "I have no doubt within the next 100 years we really will have gone to Mars.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN GEORGIA Bruson was born, William Howard Taft was president, the Ford Model T was a year old, and the Wright brothers were still trying to figure out how to fly that thing. Georgia was born on the Fourth of July, 1909, in Edgefield, S.C. She died July 29 at 106. Her life encompassed a big chunk of American history. The Model T morphed into the sleek chariots plying Interstate 95; the Wright brothers' creation became supersonic jets, and a black man is president of the United States.
NEWS
December 28, 2003 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At 10:35 a.m. on Dec. 17 - the exact moment when, 100 years before, the Wright brothers had been borne aloft and sustained flight along the windswept sands of Kitty Hawk - Merion Elementary School teacher Penny Glackman called for "a moment of thought. " Her third-grade students, wearing red, white and black T-shirts that read From Kitty Hawk to Mars - 1903 to 2003, paused to reflect. On this day, as the nation watched a reenactment in the wind and rain pummeling the beaches of North Carolina, the children had traveled on a cold and rainy day to the American Helicopter Museum in West Chester.
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NEWS
August 14, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN GEORGIA Bruson was born, William Howard Taft was president, the Ford Model T was a year old, and the Wright brothers were still trying to figure out how to fly that thing. Georgia was born on the Fourth of July, 1909, in Edgefield, S.C. She died July 29 at 106. Her life encompassed a big chunk of American history. The Model T morphed into the sleek chariots plying Interstate 95; the Wright brothers' creation became supersonic jets, and a black man is president of the United States.
TRAVEL
December 30, 2013 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
DAYTON, Ohio - North Carolina license plates proudly declare "First in Flight," while Ohio's offer the competing slogan "Birthplace of Aviation. " In this friendly interstate rivalry for bragging rights over the dawn of aviation, who's right or, in this case, Wright? It's true that Wilbur and Orville Wright were attracted by the windswept dunes of North Carolina's Outer Banks to achieve man's first powered flight. As Orville said in a note, "We came down here for wind and sand and we have got them.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Washington got one. So did Andrew Jackson, the Wright Brothers, Charles Lindbergh, Thomas Edison, Winston Churchill, and Neil Armstrong. But 161 years would pass before the Congress of the United States awarded its Gold Medal to a woman. Now, says U.S. Rep. Jon Runyan (R., N.J.), it's time for Congress to posthumously accord its highest civilian honor to Alice Paul - the unyielding civil rights advocate from Mount Laurel credited with passage of the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote.
SPORTS
February 2, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two crossed bats and the words "The Father of Baseball" are inscribed on the marble pedestal at West Laurel Hill Cemetery that supports a 6-foot-6 bronze likeness of Harry Wright. Several hundred miles from that Bala Cynwyd hillside, in Middlesex, Mass., the simple headstone marking the final resting place of Wright's younger brother, George, notes merely his name and life span. Though considerable gaps in taste and distance separate their grave sites, the Wrights remain an unbreakable tandem in baseball history.
NEWS
July 31, 2011
Wright replica crash kills two SPRINGFIELD, Ohio - A new model of a Wright brothers biplane crashed Saturday during flight testing in rural Ohio, killing the two volunteer pilots aboard. The pilots had extensive experience flying the biplane, built by a company that uses the planes to promote public awareness of Dayton as the birthplace of aviation. The pilots, Mitchell Cary and Don Gum, observed the highest standards of safety and made enormous contributions to the organization and the aviation heritage community, Phil Beaudoin, president of Wright "B" Flyer Inc., said in a statement Saturday.
NEWS
May 19, 2010 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Whatever it is - a chamber musical? operatic vaudeville? - Take Flight at Princeton's McCarter Theatre is enthralling. Taking flight as its subject and legendary aviators as its characters, it tunefully explores obsession through the interwoven stories of the Wright Brothers, Charles Lindbergh, and Amelia Earhart. With a complicated book by John Weidman (no wonder the show kept reminding me of his Sondheim collaborations Pacific Overtures and Road Show), edgy music by David Shire, who saves soaring melody for when he really needs it, and Richard Maltby Jr.'s sometimes clever, sometimes thrilling lyrics, Take Flight is an exciting work.
NEWS
August 21, 2004
Home wasn't school The Shinns, in their letter ("Home schooling OK," Aug. 18), list several historical figures as examples of successful home schooling. I don't really care one way or the other about home-schooling, but I do care about the facts. Franklin Roosevelt attended that bastion of exclusive privilege, the Groton School. Sam Clemens (Mark Twain) attended the John Dawson School in Hannibal, Mo., before being apprenticed to a printer at a very young age (I don't think being put out to work at the age of 12 counts as "home-schooled")
LIVING
May 28, 2004 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Drexel University's senior design students went international with their fashion show this year, borrowing heavily from such cultural symbols as Japanese kimonos, Egyptian headgear, and good old American denim. The result Wednesday night was a beautiful presentation of garments that flowed, sparkled and wowed the audience with awesome detail. The show started slowly with a parade of bathing suits that were pretty catalog-like, albeit well-constructed. But their ordinariness allowed Ruben Amollo's denim one-piece tank suit with matching floor-length coat, as well as a white hand-appliqued one-piece by Mandeesa Foster, to stand out. Fifteen denim outfits, designed by underclassmen and seniors, were uninspiring.
NEWS
January 11, 2004 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Camden County Vocational School in Pennsauken - which now has a second campus and is called the Camden County Technical Schools District - recently celebrated its 75th year, reflecting upon a storied past. Not only did thousands of men and women learn manufacturing there during World War II, but its students also restored the Wright Brothers plane that hangs in the Franklin Institute. The Model B Flyer Thirty years after the Wright Brothers flew the world's first airplane on windswept dunes in Kitty Hawk, N.C., Orville Wright found himself at Camden County Vocational School surrounded by eager Aero Mechanics students.
NEWS
December 28, 2003 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At 10:35 a.m. on Dec. 17 - the exact moment when, 100 years before, the Wright brothers had been borne aloft and sustained flight along the windswept sands of Kitty Hawk - Merion Elementary School teacher Penny Glackman called for "a moment of thought. " Her third-grade students, wearing red, white and black T-shirts that read From Kitty Hawk to Mars - 1903 to 2003, paused to reflect. On this day, as the nation watched a reenactment in the wind and rain pummeling the beaches of North Carolina, the children had traveled on a cold and rainy day to the American Helicopter Museum in West Chester.
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