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Wrinkles

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LIVING
December 12, 1993 | By Frank DeCaro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Unplug the iron and call off the collagen treatments. Wrinkles are the latest wrinkle in fashion. Crinkled, crushed and crumpled clothes are the rage of the runways in Europe and New York. Strong cases for folded fabrics are being made by such designers as Issey Miyake, Gianni Versace, Donna Karan, that up-and-coming pleat person Han Feng, and the British line called Ghost, which showed for the first time in New York recently. These days, thanks to them, it's cool to wear rumpled suits and slept-in- looking shirts.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1990 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania yesterday sued one of its researchers, joining the legal battle over who will have the patent rights to a popular acne treatment when it is sold as a cream to take away skin wrinkles. Penn, in a suit filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, contends that it is the owner of Retin-A when it is marketed as a product to retard wrinkles. The product, now sold as an acne treatment, is awaiting licensing as a treatment for wrinkles, though the law allows physicians to prescribe it for that purpose.
SPORTS
January 5, 2013 | Associated Press
GREEN BAY, Wis. - It's not just wild-card weekend in Minnesota and Green Bay. It's Groundhog Day . Six days after facing off in the regular-season finale, and five weeks after their first meeting of the season, the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers are at it again Saturday night. This is no yawner of a sequel, though, not when the stakes are win or winter vacation. "Like I tell the team, it doesn't matter who comes out of that tunnel, I don't care what color they have on," Packers coach Mike McCarthy said.
NEWS
August 19, 1996 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They are standing in the same spot on the Boardwalk they stood in 40 years ago. And it is still hard to get a word in edgewise. Fred Feldman, 67 and a regular on the Boardwalk since he was a newlywed from West Philly, sums it up like this: "We talked about girls then, and now we talk about food. Or else we go around and feel each other's pulse. " Forty years ago, this stretch of the Boardwalk in the Chelsea neighborhood of Atlantic City was crammed with the same characters from the same old Philadelphia Jewish neighborhoods who now return on summer weekend mornings to hang with the old - and getting older - gang.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
The basic premise of the show, as described by an enthusiastic art-historian friend - sculptures of well-known feminists' facial and neck wrinkles - didn't sound appealing at all. It seemed too gimmicky for words. It called to mind the French performance artist Orlan, whose act is the display of her own plastic surgeries, not of the late, brilliant John Coplans, who isolated sections of his own aging body in photographs, the results suggesting bizarre, hairy sculptures. But I had liked the earlier efforts of the sculptor in question, Barbara Zucker, and admired her as a cofounder of New York's A.I.R.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | by Peggy Landers, For the Daily News
So many of us are looking for miracle cures. Patches that erase wrinkles. "Peels" that promote perfection. And why shouldn't we? It's 1998 - scientists can clone cows and identify disease-causing genes. Why shouldn't they also be able to stop time and remedy yesterday's foolhardy indulgences - or at least the evidence of them encroaching on our once-virgin visages? So it is always with a hopeful quickening in our hearts that we read advertisements for such products as Centre Lucerne's Anti-Wrinkle Patch, billed as "a safe, wonderful new alternative to plastic surgery.
NEWS
June 18, 2003 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Her eyes protected by bumblebee-yellow goggles, Kimberly Campenella relaxed at Pierre & Carlo Salon and Spa as aesthetician Alexis Brown traced the contours of her face with a red laser. The scarlet light will stimulate collagen, and in a few weeks the skin around the architect's eyes, lips and jawbone will plump up, slowing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Fine lines and wrinkles? Since she's only 33, you wouldn't think that was one of Campenella's issues. One would need a magnifying glass to see the tiny lines that hug her thin lips - and with her raven hair and milky skin, she looks 28. Still, she stresses about it. And on this rainy day in June, Campenella is ready for her second wrinkle-fighting laser-light treatment at the Center City salon.
NEWS
March 21, 1987
If women have the early advantage in the war between the sexes, men do better in the middle years. They don't get stretch marks or develop cellulite, nor do they feel compelled to battle ceaselessly against bulging waistlines. Men's wrinkles are considered signs of character, while women's wrinkles are considered wrinkles. Perhaps in recognition of this lack of parity, men were given a special curse of their own - baldness. Undisguisable and irremediable, it has a powerful humbling effect, reminding men that their youth has passed.
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
ZAPPING ZITS Good news for those of you who get those unsightly blemishes: A Food and Drug Administration panel says that the benefits of benzoyl peroxide, an ingredient in popular acne medicines, outweigh the risk of getting cancer from it, and that it should remain available without a prescription while new animal studies are conducted. IRONING OUT WRINKLES An FDA advisory panel also has recommended approval of a new cream developed by Johnson & Johnson that reduces wrinkles in skin damaged by the sun. The cream, to be named Renova, is not intended to erase wrinkles caused by normal aging.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1990 | By Neill A. Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not long ago, Vernice Gabriel's career would have been over by age 30. Not these days. Instead, Gabriel, 55, finds her career thriving. Gabriel is a fashion model. A fashion model with crow's feet. As Gabriel and other older models have discovered, wrinkles can be in. "When we get the right wrinkles on the cover, I'm delighted," said Kate Greer, 53, editor in chief of New Choices magazine, which circulates to 575,000 subscribers, most of whom are 45 to 64 years old. Older models with laugh lines and salt-and-pepper hair are hearing more often these days from advertisers and fashion magazines.
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SPORTS
September 28, 2015 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last season, after two weeks of offensive struggles, Chip Kelly opened up his playbook, tinkered with his base running plays, and resurrected a moribund ground game against the St. Louis Rams and then, most impressively, the next week against the New York Giants. There were a few dips in production the rest of the season, but the Eagles never hit a valley as low as they did when they traveled to the 49ers in Week 4 and rushed for only 22 yards on 12 carries. Kelly was able to identify tendencies based on pre-snap formations and adjusted accordingly.
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Welcome to the first post-Affordable Care Act tax season, complete with new forms to fill out - the 1095-A! - and even more numbers to crunch. That is, if you bought health insurance last year on the Obamacare marketplace. "If you got a 1095-A form and you got the advance credit [subsidy], you must file a tax return," said Jackie Perlman, principal tax research analyst at H&R Block's Tax Institute. Well, not so fast. About 800,000 forms sent out by the government contained an error, the administration said Friday; it urged recipients to hold off filing for now. (More on that mess below.)
NEWS
February 3, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
What does it take to win 1,000 college basketball games? Philadelphia University's Herb Magee, already a basketball Hall of Famer - the guy who went to college on Henry Avenue 51/2 decades ago and never left - needs one more to join Duke's Mike Krzyzewski as the only NCAA men's coaches at all levels to win 1,000 times. Krzyzewski got to the number on Jan. 25. "It's staggering," said University of the Sciences coach Dave Pauley of the win total. "Twenty wins a year for 50 years.
SPORTS
August 4, 2014 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chip Kelly has said since Day 1 that offense is personnel-driven. He said it again on his 561st day as Eagles coach. "The biggest thing that you have to do is identify the skill-sets you have and adjust those skill-sets, and that's what football has always been," Kelly said Friday. "Our offense has changed every year I've been in charge of the offense, whether I was at New Hampshire, Oregon, or here. " And it will change - evolve is probably a better word for it - this year.
SPORTS
January 5, 2013 | Associated Press
GREEN BAY, Wis. - It's not just wild-card weekend in Minnesota and Green Bay. It's Groundhog Day . Six days after facing off in the regular-season finale, and five weeks after their first meeting of the season, the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers are at it again Saturday night. This is no yawner of a sequel, though, not when the stakes are win or winter vacation. "Like I tell the team, it doesn't matter who comes out of that tunnel, I don't care what color they have on," Packers coach Mike McCarthy said.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Want a clue to your risk of heart disease? Look in the mirror. People who look old - with receding hairlines, bald heads, creases near their earlobes, or bumpy deposits on their eyelids - have a greater chance of developing heart disease than younger-looking people the same age do, new research suggests. Doctors say the study highlights the difference between biological and chronological age. "Looking old for your age marks poor cardiovascular health," said Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen of the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.
SPORTS
October 12, 2012 | BY TIM GILBERT, Daily News Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE - He owes it to his players. It helps his recruiting. So, is there really any good reason for Bill O'Brien not to let NFL scouts watch his practices? O'Brien, Penn State's first-year coach, has opened the gates of the Lasch Football Building's practice fields on Wednesdays to scouts from the next level, something that was not done under Joe Paterno. O'Brien was formerly the offensive coordinator of the New England Patriots. A few of his Nittany Lions are likely NFL-bound, and he wants to give them the best opportunity to be seen by pro scouts.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A mail room without mailboxes. A library with few hard copies of books and magazines. Gleaming metal tables for dissecting cadavers, with flat-screen monitors overhead. And just one lecture hall, which its users will try to avoid as much as possible. These are just a few hallmarks of the changing way that new doctors will learn their trade, at least in Camden. Tuesday marks the grand opening for Cooper Medical School of Rowan University and its new, publicly funded, $139 million building.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cate Blanchett is an actual, real human woman. She has lines on her face; wrinkles! She's also beautiful. The 42-year-old Australian thesp's naked face appears on the cover of the Economist's feature mag, Intelligent Life, without makeup or digital alterations. It makes us wonder whether we've ever seen the actual face of any of the countless women deemed beautiful by the media. "When other magazines photograph actresses, they routinely end up running heavily Photoshopped images, with every last wrinkle expunged," writes editor Tim de Lisle . More Houston rumors She can't get away from drug chatter even in death.
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Anna Nguyen, For The Inquirer
Items on Jeff Wojciechowski's to-do list before a 2010 family vacation to Cancun included renewing his passport, shopping for beach wear, and getting a Botox injection. The procedure wasn't to smooth out wrinkles. Instead, the injection went into his bladder muscle, to give the 63-year-old Fort Washington man a respite from incontinence that has plagued him since a 2006 construction accident left him paralyzed from mid-chest down. Though Botox has become synonymous with the temporary elimination of wrinkles, what's less well known is its application across medicine.
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