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NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald H. Fey, 82, a Korean War veteran, former Philadelphia firefighter, and retired fund-raising writer, died Sunday, Oct. 18, of heart failure at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Fey, of Drexel Hill, whose daughter is award-winning writer and actress Tina Fey, was a professional writer for more than 30 years, primarily in fund-raising and development. He helped raise more than $500 million for schools, hospitals, and public-service agencies. In 1992, he retired from Thomas Jefferson University, where he was director of development communications.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | By JACK SMITH
I'm standing at a cocktail party in Wayne, eyeballing the dip, when a Junior League-ish young matron walks up with a conversation-opener: "I hear you're a writer. " I nod, but I'm chary. There's something about being a writer that seems to call for an explanation. This is especially so along the Main Line, where finding a writer in their midst merely verifies popular suspicions. "You guys," began a well-lubricated Devonite one evening not long ago, "You're always writing about the bland, soulless suburbs.
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Novelist, story-writer and critic Ann Petry, 77, will be honored for her "lifetime achievements and her inspiration to contemporary writers" at ceremonies during the fifth annual Celebration of Black Writing, to be held in Philadelphia Feb. 4 and 5. The two-day series of panels, workshops and receptions has been organized by the nonprofit educational organization Moonstone Inc. and will be held at various locations. Petry, who is the author of a number of novels and story collections, including The Street (1946)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Writer of O, a literary doc about the woman behind the pseudonym of the once-scandalous erotic novel Story of O, features interviews with academic types, journalists, French publishing veterans, and the wonderfully sweet-looking octogenarian author, Dominique Aury. The film, by Pola Rapaport, also juices up this fairly dry business with "reenactments" from the book - supposedly penned by Pauline Reage and published in Paris in 1954. As a narrator reads naughty bits about a woman and her adventures in submission, voyeurism and multiple-partner sex, an attractive young actress dressed (and undressed)
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeanmarie Dunn Coogan, 71, a writer and magazine editor, died Friday in Shelburne, Vt. A West Philadelphia native, Mrs. Coogan graduated from West Catholic School for Girls and Immaculata College. After graduating with honors in 1947, she joined the editorial staff of Ladies Home Journal. When she married her husband, Joseph, in 1950, she left full-time journalism but continued to maintain her ties to the Journal. Her "Kate's Girl" series of stories first appeared in the Journal in the early 1960s.
LIVING
October 25, 1998 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Tim O'Brien started writing Tomcat in Love (Broadway Books, $26), he thought he was working on a memoir. For years he had been thinking of writing about a childhood incident in which he and a friend had built a plywood cross and nearly nailed the friend's sister to it. "We never did, of course. But we came damned close," he said during an interview while in Philadelphia recently. While working on his "memoir," he called his editor and asked if it would be "OK if I made up some dialogue and made up a few incidents" to cover the gaps of a faulty memory.
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | By Frederick Cusick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack Lloyd, 66, a writer and columnist for The Inquirer for more than 30 years, died Sunday of a heart attack at Pennsylvania Hospital. Mr. Lloyd, who wrote about popular culture, entertainment, jazz, and the Atlantic City performance scene, among other duties, had retired in 1997, but he continued to write for the paper up until his death. His last piece, an Atlantic City entertainment article on a show at the Tropicana called "Legends of the Catskills," was published May 19 in the Weekend section.
LIVING
March 1, 1996 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Shawna, 11, is a writer. She always has a pad and pencil in her hands so that every thought can be captured on paper before it escapes her. She writes stories and then writes letters to the characters in the stories. She writes routines and cheers for the cheerleading club, and she makes many entries in her diary. It's an outlet for her feelings of joy, sadness and anger. Therapy is helping her deal with abuse and neglect that she endured in the past. When Shawna reads, however, she prefers picture books.
NEWS
July 10, 1986 | By Avery Chenoweth, Special to The Inquirer
Ellen Currie got off to the start a young writer dreams about. She was still in her 20s when her short stories began appearing in such magazines as the New Yorker - and today, at 55, her first novel is winning heady reviews. But in the interim, a nightmarish case of writer's block silenced her for more than 20 years. For the shy yet amiable writer, the worst is over. Critics have resoundingly praised her novel, Available Light, and it was selected as a Book of the Month Club alternate.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1987 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
"I started writing poetry when I was a teenager because there was something inside me and I didn't know how to get it out. It was a gesture of release that scared me at first because I didn't know why I did it. " Playwright Charles Jenkins, 38, settles his lanky frame against the desk in his small office, the beginnings of a smile flirting with his face. He shrugs, spreading long, thin fingers - suitable for either much typing or much piano playing - along the desk's edge. "After a while, writing became so much a part of my life that I couldn't function not writing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, STAFF WRITER
Ray Quick's father, Clarence, made a name for himself as a founding member of the Del-Vikings, a pioneering, Pittsburgh-based doo-wop quintet that was among the first racially integrated singing groups of the 1950s. Clarence Quick penned the group's biggest hits, including "Come Go With Me" - the tune John Lennon's band the Quarrymen was playing at a Liverpool church in 1957 when Paul McCartney first noticed him, according to Beatles lore. As magical as those moments are, they are not why Ray Quick most remembers his father and devotes his life's work to his memory.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Joe McGinniss Jr. tells intense, rapid-fire stories about an America that seems permanently down on its luck. The novelist, who grew up in Swarthmore, made his literary debut with 2008's The Delivery Man , about a trio of young Las Vegas natives who get sucked into criminality. Its searing portrait of a lost generation earned it comparisons to Bret Easton Ellis' Less Than Zero . McGinniss' sophomore effort, Carousel Court , is about the toll the foreclosure crisis takes on a young Southern California couple.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, FOR PHILLY.COM/GEEK
Given her prominence in trailers-and number of cosplayers dressing like her at San Diego Comic-Con last month, it is clear that Margot Robbie's Harley Quinn is the breakout star of Suicide Squad , which opened this weekend to an August record $135 million. However, fans of the character who have not seen her new look may be wondering what happened to the jester-clad Quinn created by Paul Dini and Bruce Timm for Batman: The Animated Series in 1992. Enter the first couple of comics, Jimmy Palmiotti and Amanda Conner, who took on the challenge of totally revamping the character's appearance as part of DC's "New 52" line-wide relaunch back in 2011.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, FOR PHILLY.COM/GEEK
During a seminal run in the 1990s, Dan Jurgens wrote some of the best-selling Superman stories of the past 25 years. He killed and resurrected the hero and added now-classic and formidable villains to his rogue's gallery, like Doomsday and Cyborg Superman. Given all that, returning to the character as part of DC's line-wide relaunch "Rebirth," may strike some as a no-win scenario. Jurgens doesn't think so. "I think that, this time in knowing what this character is and knowing what 'Rebirth' was designed to do, that there was a natural fit there," he told Comics Guy Jerome Maida.
NEWS
August 2, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
A celebration of life will be held Wednesday, Aug. 3, for Russell E. Miller 3d, 90, formerly of Clifton Heights, a Realtor, radio show host, and writer, who died July 13 of a heart ailment in a hospice in Fort Myers, Fla. He had moved to Fort Myers 12 years ago. Born to Florence and Russell Miller Jr. in Philadelphia, Mr. Miller grew up on a farm in Ambler. He was self-educated, and, as a result, he became something of a Renaissance man, his family said. He served in the Coast Guard during World War II. Afterward, he built a career as a Realtor, and with his wife, Winifred V. Miller, he taught lawyers about real estate and estate planning.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Steve & Mia, $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Q: I'm going to ask you a favor, both of you. On June 24, your column had a question from a lady who couldn't find someone for herself. I'm in the same predicament. I am in exceptionally good shape for my age, and I think I'm average-looking. I'm 57, single, never married, and no children. I have a bit of snow on the roof, but plenty of fire in the furnace. Can you give her my address, and we could correspond? If so, I'll write you and tell you how things went. If that is permissible. Thank you in advance.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Ken Bookman, 67, of Bala Cynwyd, a journalist who turned a passion for cooking into a successful career as a food editor and cookbook writer, died Sunday, July 17, at his home after a long struggle with uveal melanoma, a cancer of the eye. Mr. Bookman, known to colleagues for his razor-sharp wit as much as his finely honed culinary skills, was food editor at the Inquirer at a time when newspapers started covering restaurants and cooking as seriously as...
NEWS
July 3, 2016
Barbara Goldsmith, 85, a best-selling writer who chronicled high-society contretemps including the custody dispute over "poor little rich" Gloria Vanderbilt in the 1930s, unveiling the wealthy and famous as often empty and unhappy, died June 26 at her home in New York City. The cause was congestive heart failure, said her assistant Jeremy Steinke. Ms. Goldsmith was a founding editor of New York magazine, a contributor to publications including Vanity Fair and the New Yorker, and the author of four nonfiction books.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
A YOUNG mother gives up her newborn baby boy for adoption only months before her own high school graduation. The mother is 17. Nearly 50 years later, the mother, Victoria Huggins Peurifoy, tells the story in a letter to a son she saw only once. In a poem based off a family photograph, which includes a little girl, Carol Richardson McCullough writes of the sister she never met. The toddler died before McCullough was born. These are samples of the stories and poems collected in two new books, Anthology 2 and Portraits Through Time.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Lynn Rosen, For The Inquirer
The Rosenbach Museum and Library is always on the alert for a good literary anniversary - or an anniversary that can be celebrated through literature. The former is coming up June 16 - Bloomsday, the Rosenbach's annual celebration of James Joyce's novel Ulysses , which takes place on that date in 1904. The Rosenbach event has grown over the last 20-plus years to include readings, concerts, and even a Bloomsday 101 trivia quiz at Fergie's Pub. This year marks the centenary of the Irish Easter Rising, and the Rosenbach will host a literary celebration to mark that occasion Thursday evening, when contemporary Irish writers will take the stage of the Montgomery Auditorium at the Free Library of Philadelphia.
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