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NEWS
October 1, 1992 | By JACK SMITH
I'm standing at a cocktail party in Wayne, eyeballing the dip, when a Junior League-ish young matron walks up with a conversation-opener: "I hear you're a writer. " I nod, but I'm chary. There's something about being a writer that seems to call for an explanation. This is especially so along the Main Line, where finding a writer in their midst merely verifies popular suspicions. "You guys," began a well-lubricated Devonite one evening not long ago, "You're always writing about the bland, soulless suburbs.
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Novelist, story-writer and critic Ann Petry, 77, will be honored for her "lifetime achievements and her inspiration to contemporary writers" at ceremonies during the fifth annual Celebration of Black Writing, to be held in Philadelphia Feb. 4 and 5. The two-day series of panels, workshops and receptions has been organized by the nonprofit educational organization Moonstone Inc. and will be held at various locations. Petry, who is the author of a number of novels and story collections, including The Street (1946)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Writer of O, a literary doc about the woman behind the pseudonym of the once-scandalous erotic novel Story of O, features interviews with academic types, journalists, French publishing veterans, and the wonderfully sweet-looking octogenarian author, Dominique Aury. The film, by Pola Rapaport, also juices up this fairly dry business with "reenactments" from the book - supposedly penned by Pauline Reage and published in Paris in 1954. As a narrator reads naughty bits about a woman and her adventures in submission, voyeurism and multiple-partner sex, an attractive young actress dressed (and undressed)
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeanmarie Dunn Coogan, 71, a writer and magazine editor, died Friday in Shelburne, Vt. A West Philadelphia native, Mrs. Coogan graduated from West Catholic School for Girls and Immaculata College. After graduating with honors in 1947, she joined the editorial staff of Ladies Home Journal. When she married her husband, Joseph, in 1950, she left full-time journalism but continued to maintain her ties to the Journal. Her "Kate's Girl" series of stories first appeared in the Journal in the early 1960s.
LIVING
October 25, 1998 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Tim O'Brien started writing Tomcat in Love (Broadway Books, $26), he thought he was working on a memoir. For years he had been thinking of writing about a childhood incident in which he and a friend had built a plywood cross and nearly nailed the friend's sister to it. "We never did, of course. But we came damned close," he said during an interview while in Philadelphia recently. While working on his "memoir," he called his editor and asked if it would be "OK if I made up some dialogue and made up a few incidents" to cover the gaps of a faulty memory.
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | By Frederick Cusick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack Lloyd, 66, a writer and columnist for The Inquirer for more than 30 years, died Sunday of a heart attack at Pennsylvania Hospital. Mr. Lloyd, who wrote about popular culture, entertainment, jazz, and the Atlantic City performance scene, among other duties, had retired in 1997, but he continued to write for the paper up until his death. His last piece, an Atlantic City entertainment article on a show at the Tropicana called "Legends of the Catskills," was published May 19 in the Weekend section.
LIVING
March 1, 1996 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Shawna, 11, is a writer. She always has a pad and pencil in her hands so that every thought can be captured on paper before it escapes her. She writes stories and then writes letters to the characters in the stories. She writes routines and cheers for the cheerleading club, and she makes many entries in her diary. It's an outlet for her feelings of joy, sadness and anger. Therapy is helping her deal with abuse and neglect that she endured in the past. When Shawna reads, however, she prefers picture books.
NEWS
July 10, 1986 | By Avery Chenoweth, Special to The Inquirer
Ellen Currie got off to the start a young writer dreams about. She was still in her 20s when her short stories began appearing in such magazines as the New Yorker - and today, at 55, her first novel is winning heady reviews. But in the interim, a nightmarish case of writer's block silenced her for more than 20 years. For the shy yet amiable writer, the worst is over. Critics have resoundingly praised her novel, Available Light, and it was selected as a Book of the Month Club alternate.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1987 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
"I started writing poetry when I was a teenager because there was something inside me and I didn't know how to get it out. It was a gesture of release that scared me at first because I didn't know why I did it. " Playwright Charles Jenkins, 38, settles his lanky frame against the desk in his small office, the beginnings of a smile flirting with his face. He shrugs, spreading long, thin fingers - suitable for either much typing or much piano playing - along the desk's edge. "After a while, writing became so much a part of my life that I couldn't function not writing.
SPORTS
December 10, 2009 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tim Donaghy has become the latest public figure to write a book before reading one. The difference is that most of those other "authors" had ghost writers. Donaghy said he had help from no one - except his mother. In his new book, Personal Foul: A First-Person Account of the Scandal that Rocked the NBA, the disgraced NBA referee writes that because he was never a very good student, he was proud of himself for graduating from Villanova. "Not bad," he wrote, "for someone who had never read a book.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Your relationship with your hometown can be complicated. Add media representation and identity politics to the mix, and that rapport becomes even thornier. These are some of the issues explored in the essays that make up City by City: Dispatches from the American Metropolis , a collection released by literary magazine n+1 - some essays originally appeared on the mag's website - and Farrar, Straus, and Giroux. Anthology coeditor Stephen Squibb, n+1 editor Dayna Tortorici, and contributor Elias Rodriques, who currently lives in Philadelphia, will speak at the Free Library of Philadelphia on June 22. The authors chronicle how their hometowns, and the issues within, influenced them.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
While an upper-class student in the late 1940s at the Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, Margaret McFate met A. Richard Webster on a blind date arranged by his sister, a Shipley classmate. "They met at a train platform, the Bryn Mawr train station," where he had come from his mother's home in Merion, their daughter Beth Stouffer said. "He looked very young, but he was smoking a pipe and trying to appear much older than he was," she said. Webster had dropped out of Amherst College by the time they met and, "right after she had graduated" from Shipley in 1950, "they had gotten a marriage license" and hoped to elope.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2015 | Ellen Gray, Daily News
* ODD MOM OUT. 10 tonight, Bravo. * BECOMING US. 9 tonight, ABC Family. PHILLY'S Julie Rottenberg and Elisa Zuritsky aren't done with New York. TV writers who explored singles and friendship in "Sex and the City" and took viewers backstage on Broadway in "Smash," the longtime writing partners take a bite out of another Big Apple subculture in Bravo's new comedy "Odd Mom Out. " The show, premiering tonight in back-to-back episodes, stars Jill Kargman, an Upper East Sider who plays an only slightly more outrageous version of herself as a well-off but not super-rich mother of three trying to stay afloat in a sea of affluence.
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
David W. Bartelt, 70, of Ardmore, a teacher and writer who worked to achieve racial and economic parity in housing in America's cities and suburbs, died Friday, May 15, of cancer at Sunrise of Haverford. A Philadelphia native, Dr. Bartelt spent his scholarly career looking at an array of categories such as racial and economic inequality and exploring how they related to housing in different neighborhoods. Once he amassed data, he wrote and lectured on his findings. He conducted his research first as a professor in the sociology department at Glassboro State College and later in the geography and urban studies department at Temple University.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
FOR COMICS writer and historian Danny Fingeroth, coming to Wizard World Comic Con Philly (through Sunday at the Convention Center) is like coming home. "I have a sentimental attachment to Philadelphia," said Fingeroth, who is best known for editing the Spider-Man group of titles for Marvel in the 1990s. "I grew up in New York. If my family wanted to go away for a weekend or a few days, we'd often go to Philadelphia. "I remember the Mummers Parade and just enjoying some old-time Jewish neighborhoods," he continued.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
THE MAN who helped Spider-Man reach the "big time" is coming back to the City of Brotherly Love for Wizard Philly 2015 - and he couldn't be happier. "I've been to Wizard Philly numerous times. I love Philly," said Dan Slott, one of the most popular and prolific writers working in comics today. "I am most looking forward to finally putting to rest . . . Pat's or Geno's? The eternal question! Though, I hear if I want the real Philly cheesesteak experience, I have to stray from the bright lights of Pat's and Geno's.
NEWS
April 14, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
David R. Boldt, 73, formerly of Chestnut Hill, an Inquirer opinion editor and steward of the paper's Sunday magazine during an acclaimed 28-year career, died Sunday, April 12, of pancreatic cancer at his home in Pasadena, Calif. Mr. Boldt's career at The Inquirer spanned the years 1972 to 2000. He was among the editorial talent recruited by executive editor Eugene L. Roberts Jr. in the 1970s that helped build The Inquirer into a winner of multiple Pulitzer Prizes. Perhaps his most public face was as editorial page editor from 1988 to 1998, when he was unafraid to take unpopular stands on sensitive topics.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
She was "Our Gal in Paris. " That's how Rubye Graham was billed on the front page of The Inquirer for her reviews of top fashion designers during the 1960s and early '70s. Rubye Graham Hennessy, as she was later known, was tasked with making the newspaper's fashion coverage more exciting. She arrived in 1959, and by 1966 - well, this is how Philadelphia Magazine described her entrance to a Paris restaurant packed with the elite of haute couture: " Everyone will be at Maxim's.
SPORTS
April 10, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
THE MAN responsible for hiring Stan Hochman at the Daily News paused a long time. The news that his old friend had died yesterday hit Larry Merchant like a hard left hook. "I feel as though Stan was a part of my life that was good, a part that I left behind in Philadelphia," said Merchant, 84, a longtime boxing commentator with HBO. "He was just good. A good writer, a good reporter, a good commentator and a good man. " Merchant hired Hochman in June of 1959 after Sandy Grady had left for the Bulletin.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2015
YOU'VE PROBABLY never heard of Rob Peace, but you might have. Peace was supposed to have done really big things with his life. The son of a single mother and a dad jailed for murder, he grew up in a low-income neighborhood in Newark, N.J., during the height of that city's crack-fueled drug wars. His mother worked in a hospital cafeteria and scrimped to get him into a private high school, where he excelled, earning straight A's. After graduating at the top of his class, Peace enrolled at Yale University on a full scholarship paid by a wealthy benefactor, who told him, "You can go to college wherever you want.
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