CollectionsWriter
IN THE NEWS

Writer

NEWS
April 28, 1989 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tatyana Tolstaya snubbed out a cigarette, fiddled with one spiral silver earring and launched into a dissection of the Russian mind, a favorite topic for Soviets and Americans alike. "The problem of modern people in Russia especially is they find it impossible to express themselves," she said in melodious, deeply accented English. "They have feelings but they have no words. I think that is one of the reasons the writer in Russia is such an important person, why the government kills for writing - for a single word pronounced - and why the people make a hero out of the writer.
NEWS
January 16, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eleanor Kratz Denoon, 94, a former teacher and public relations writer who in 1999 helped set up the Kratz Center for Creative Writing at Goucher College near Baltimore, died of heart disease Jan. 7 at Pennswood Village in Newtown Township, Bucks County. The center, whose director is the novelist Madison Smartt Bell, brings nationally recognized authors to the campus, where each is writer-in-residence for a semester. The writers have included Louise Erdrich, W.S. Merwin, and Robert Stone.
NEWS
July 15, 2012
Philip Fradkin, 77, whose 13 books often focused on the legacy of environmental destruction in the West and who took aim at what he viewed as the simplification of the region by many in the East, died last Sunday at his home in Point Reyes Station, Calif. The cause was cancer, according to his wife, Dianne. Mr. Fradkin grew up in New Jersey and moved to California while in his 20s after becoming enamored of the West during a road trip with his father when he was 14. He went on to explore many major Western themes in his books.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Anxious, depressive, paranoid - that's "the Goldstein Style" that takes Argentina by storm in Samy and I - an appealing, Woody Allen-ish excursion into urban-dwelling neuroses, writer's block and bubbly bombshells who come along to save the day. This month's offering in Jewish Film Festival 23, writer-director Eduardo Milewicz's 2002 comedy stars Ricardo Dar?n as Samy Goldstein, a gloomy sitcom scribe who, when asked what he does, responds: "I...
NEWS
January 17, 1998 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bruce William Anderson, 47, a writer and musician, died Jan. 9 at Abington Hospital from myelofibrosis, a rare blood disease. A lifelong Burlington City resident, Mr. Anderson was a graduate of Holy Cross High School in Delran. Mr. Anderson pursued his twin interests in music and writing in his career and his community activities. In the early 1990s, he began writing a weekly freelance music review column for the Courier-Post. He became a staff writer for the paper in 1995 and worked there full time through much of 1997.
NEWS
August 2, 2012
Maeve Binchy, 72, one of Ireland's most popular writers, with more than 40 million books sold worldwide, died Monday in Dublin after a brief illness, Irish media and national leaders said. She was best known for her depictions of human relationships and their crises in such books as Circle of Friends and Tara Road . The Irish Times told the Associated Press that it had spoken to her family and said the author died at a Dublin hospital Monday with her husband, Gordon Snell, by her side.
NEWS
December 2, 2012
Alan S. Oser, 81, the New York Times' authoritative voice in real estate coverage for more than 30 years as a writer and editor, died Tuesday in Barcelona, Spain, where he was celebrating his 60th wedding anniversary with his wife, Janice. The cause was a stroke, said his son, Roy. From 1969 through 2004, several years past his nominal retirement, Mr. Oser wrote about real estate in the daily Times and in the Sunday Real Estate section. In 2004, Mr. Oser, a violinist, founded New Paths in Music, a nonprofit organization in Manhattan that presents the work of foreign composers whose music has rarely if ever been performed in this country.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Writers Milton Dank and John P. Hayes sent a message to Lincoln High School students on Thursday: Suffering breeds prose. "The more a writer suffers in his childhood, the better the writer," said Hayes, who along with Dank was a guest speaker at the Seventh Authors Luncheon at the school on Rowland and Ryan Avenues. Appropriately, the luncheon was held on the birthday of William Shakespeare. More than 120 students and faculty paid $1 to hear about the makings of a writer. Hayes, a free-lance writer and assistant professor at Temple University's communications department, recounted an emotionally turbulent childhood that later was his inspiration to write.
LIVING
December 31, 1997 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Happy writers have histories shorter even than happy families," Brendan Gill said in the opening lines of his 1975 best-seller, Here at the New Yorker. "The whole of my professional career can be summed up by saying that I started out at the place where I wanted most to be . . . and with much pleasure and very little labor have remained here ever since. " Gill died Saturday at 83. And after 60 years, he was still a staff writer for the New Yorker. For that matter, the edition of the magazine now on the stands - the Jan. 5 edition - includes a piece by Gill on the New York City skyline.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|