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NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last few weeks, Philadelphia-based investigative reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely has received international attention for her Rolling Stone article "A Rape on Campus," telling of the gang rape of a student, identified only as "Jackie," at a fraternity party at the University of Virginia. On Friday, after a series of news reports questioned Erdely's work, Rolling Stone issued an apology citing unspecified discrepancies in the story. "Because of the sensitive nature of Jackie's story," the magazine's managing editor, Will Dana, wrote, "we decided to honor her request not to contact the man she claimed orchestrated the attack on her, nor any of the men she claimed participated in the attack, for fear of retaliation against her. ... "There now appear to be discrepancies in Jackie's account, and we have come to the conclusion that our trust in her was misplaced," the statement read.
NEWS
November 22, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Appell told an interviewer in 2012 that "my first instrument was my brother's ukulele. " His musical abilities eventually expanded. And they expanded enough that the nation soon heard much of what he published, beginning as a song writer and producer for Cameo-Parkway Records in Philadelphia in the 1950s and 1960s. Among the hits which Mr. Appell wrote was "Let's Twist Again," which Chubby Checker made famous. On Tuesday, Nov. 18, Mr. Appell, 92, formerly of Cherry Hill, died at Collingswood Manor, an assisted living community.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seymour Shubin, 93, of Paoli, a best-selling mystery writer, died Sunday, Nov. 2, at his home of complications from an earlier fall. Mr. Shubin's books were reviewed in The Inquirer, the New York Times, the Philadelphia Daily News, and other publications. He was an influential part of the Philadelphia literary scene in the 1970s and 1980s, winning many major awards for fiction writing. Mr. Shubin was born in Philadelphia to Isadore and Ida Shubin, Russian immigrants active in the Jewish community.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Hanks, man of letters Seems James Franco and Snooki aren't the only celebs who know how to write stories and poems and books and such. Tom Hanks , 58, the only human on the planet it is impossible to dislike (even we can't help but adore the perennial movie good guy), has signed with Alfred A. Knopf to publish a collection of his short stories. Hanks, who recently published a yarn in the New Yorker, says each story is inspired by a piece from his extensive collection of typewriters.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JIM MOFFATT once wrote that he used to tell his journalism students at Rutgers-Camden, "Just remember that while you guys are doing sex and drugs on Friday nights, I'm chasing commas at the Inquirer. " It never failed to get a laugh, although he wrote that once, after delivering the quip, an older student remarked, "Mr. Moffatt, you ought to get a life. " "Gee, I said to myself, I thought I had a life," he wrote. The piece was a sort of farewell note to the newspaper business, printed in the Inquirer on Nov. 11, 1996, shortly before his retirement after 32 years as a copy editor.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Betty White Bohlen, 94, a writer and longtime resident of the Quadrangle in Haverford, died Thursday, Oct. 16, of respiratory failure at home. Mrs. Bohlen spent most of her adult life on the Main Line. She graduated from Abington High School in 1938. She earned a bachelor of arts degree in English literature and creative writing in 1943 from the University of Pennsylvania, where she pledged the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. An author, Mrs. Bohlen wrote two novels and many articles and stories for such publications as the Chestnut Hill Local and the Quadrangle Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2014 | By Rathe Miller, For The Inquirer
Does God exist? What was Nixon really like? And perhaps most important: Will the Eagles make it to the Super Bowl? You can ask Sam Harris, Henry Kissinger, and Ray Didinger those questions, or anything else on your mind. Authors Harris ( Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion ); Kissinger ( World Order ), and Didinger ( The New Eagles Encyclopedia ) may not give you the definitive answers, but they will give you highly informed opinions. They are just three on the impressive roster of more than 50 writers coming to Philadelphia over the next few months for the Free Library's annual author series.
SPORTS
September 3, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
FIRST A PARADE, now this. The Taney Little Leaguers, who won the hearts of Philly-area fans while finishing as U.S. runners-ups in the World Series, have been named "Team of the Year," by the Philadelphia Sports Writer Association. Previous winners, include the Phillies, Red Sox and Yankees. "Taney's accomplishments transcend sports," PSWA president Ron Corbin said in a statement. "They were chosen for representing Philadelphia and the region, and because the organization's approach is a textbook example of what sports - and especially youth sports - are all about.
NEWS
September 1, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony Bruno, 61, a well-regarded writer of crime novels and books about real-life criminals as well as a devoted teacher of the Japanese martial art aikido, died Thursday, Aug. 28, at Lankenau Medical Center in Wynnewood. He had suffered a cerebral hemorrhage several days earlier. Mr. Bruno, who lived in the Queen Village section of Philadelphia with his wife, Judith Sachs, was the author of Iceman: The True Story of a Cold Blooded Killer . The book is an authoritative account of the life of contract killer Richard Kuklinski, who claimed to have murdered as many as 200 people during his long criminal career affiliated with various North Jersey and New York crime families.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
With their lovely photography, pretty frocks, and polite manners, British costume dramas such as Downton Abbey make life in the pre-penicillin era look so awfully inviting we'd all love to visit. But would we? "In 1900 New York, there was 60,000 gallons of horse urine on the streets on any given day," said Michael Begler, "and 2.5 million pounds of manure. " Begler and his longtime collaborator Jack Amiel are the creators and writers of an entirely different sort of period drama, Cinemax's The Knick , a medical drama about the doctors, nurses, and patients of New York's Knickerbocker Hospital in the first years of the 20th century.
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