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SPORTS
January 17, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lewis Katz, whose passion for sports was only exceeded by his philanthropy, will be honored posthumously when the Philadelphia Sports Writers Association holds its 111th annual banquet Friday at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Cherry Hill. Katz will be named the winner of the Ed Snider Lifetime Humanitarian award for his charitable work. Snider, chairman of the Flyers' parent company, Comcast-Spectacor, will present the award to members of Katz's family. When Snider was married in 2013, Katz served as his best man. "He was the best man because he is the best man I've ever known," Snider said at Katz's memorial service last year.
NEWS
January 13, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A historic Camden townhouse that was home to a prominent Camden doctor will again be filled with life and learning when Rutgers University students and faculty move in to their new Writers House. The Henry Genet Taylor House, undergoing renovations at 305 Cooper St., will open next academic year as the home of Rutgers-Camden's graduate programs in English, with space for classes, workshops, offices, and public events. "This building is a gem - maybe one of the best of its type in the region - and I do think it has got to be more inspirational than sitting around chipped, cramped classroom desks in a 1960s building," Lisa Zeidner, an English professor at Rutgers-Camden and a novelist, wrote in an e-mail.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Constance K. Dean, 94, of Gladwyne, a journalist who later became a publicist, died Tuesday, Dec. 30, of influenza at Lankenau Hospital. An Overbrook native, Mrs. Dean graduated from Overbrook High School in 1938 and earned a bachelor of science degree in commerce from Temple University's School of Communications in 1942. Mrs. Dean began her career by working for International News Service, founded by publisher William Randolph Hearst. She was based in Philadelphia, from which her news and feature stories went out on the wire and appeared in newspapers, journals and periodicals.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
A few months before martial law was declared in Poland on Dec. 13, 1981, the poet and samizdat writer Stanislaw Baranczak arrived at Harvard. He was the Alfred Jurzykowski Professor of Polish Language and Literature there until Parkinson's disease forced him to retire in 1997. He died of pneumonia Dec. 26 at age 68. Baranczak was a cofounder of a pre-Solidarity organization, the KOR, was arrested for supporting the workers, and was fired from his teaching post at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan.
SPORTS
December 31, 2014
AMERICAN LEAGUE Most Valuable Player Mike Trout, of the Los Angeles Angels, a native of Millville, N.J., will be honored as the Outstanding Pro Athlete of the Year by the Philadelphia Sports Writers Association at its 111th annual banquet on Jan. 16 at Cherry Hill's Crowne Plaza Hotel. Trout, who has not yet confirmed his attendance, also won the award 2 years ago after he was named the AL's Rookie of the Year. The 23-year-old, who became the youngest unanimous MVP pick in major league history, was a huge crowd favorite in May when he played here against the Phillies.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
DAN STERLING , "the guy that brought down Sony," is from West Philadelphia. So wrote 24/7 Molly Eichel on philly.com yesterday. Sterling, you see, is the fella who wrote "The Interview," the film at the center of the Sony hacking scandal. The movie, which now may never be seen, stars James Franco and Seth Rogen as TV journalists tasked with assassinating North Korean leader Kim Jong-un . Sony canceled the theatrical release after hacker group Guardians of Peace threatened an attack on theaters screening the film.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last few weeks, Philadelphia-based investigative reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely has received international attention for her Rolling Stone article "A Rape on Campus," telling of the gang rape of a student, identified only as "Jackie," at a fraternity party at the University of Virginia. On Friday, after a series of news reports questioned Erdely's work, Rolling Stone issued an apology citing unspecified discrepancies in the story. "Because of the sensitive nature of Jackie's story," the magazine's managing editor, Will Dana, wrote, "we decided to honor her request not to contact the man she claimed orchestrated the attack on her, nor any of the men she claimed participated in the attack, for fear of retaliation against her. ... "There now appear to be discrepancies in Jackie's account, and we have come to the conclusion that our trust in her was misplaced," the statement read.
NEWS
November 22, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Appell told an interviewer in 2012 that "my first instrument was my brother's ukulele. " His musical abilities eventually expanded. And they expanded enough that the nation soon heard much of what he published, beginning as a song writer and producer for Cameo-Parkway Records in Philadelphia in the 1950s and 1960s. Among the hits which Mr. Appell wrote was "Let's Twist Again," which Chubby Checker made famous. On Tuesday, Nov. 18, Mr. Appell, 92, formerly of Cherry Hill, died at Collingswood Manor, an assisted living community.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seymour Shubin, 93, of Paoli, a best-selling mystery writer, died Sunday, Nov. 2, at his home of complications from an earlier fall. Mr. Shubin's books were reviewed in The Inquirer, the New York Times, the Philadelphia Daily News, and other publications. He was an influential part of the Philadelphia literary scene in the 1970s and 1980s, winning many major awards for fiction writing. Mr. Shubin was born in Philadelphia to Isadore and Ida Shubin, Russian immigrants active in the Jewish community.
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