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June 3, 2016 | By Lynn Rosen, For The Inquirer
The Rosenbach Museum and Library is always on the alert for a good literary anniversary - or an anniversary that can be celebrated through literature. The former is coming up June 16 - Bloomsday, the Rosenbach's annual celebration of James Joyce's novel Ulysses , which takes place on that date in 1904. The Rosenbach event has grown over the last 20-plus years to include readings, concerts, and even a Bloomsday 101 trivia quiz at Fergie's Pub. This year marks the centenary of the Irish Easter Rising, and the Rosenbach will host a literary celebration to mark that occasion Thursday evening, when contemporary Irish writers will take the stage of the Montgomery Auditorium at the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
It's hard to think of a contemporary writer as quintessentially Philadelphian as Diane McKinney-Whetstone. The Chestnut Hill resident, who grew up in West Philadelphia, creates characters firmly rooted in the city and its neighborhoods, its parks and streets, its slums and mansions. Anchored by the city, her stories explore the nitty-gritty of life for ordinary people who live on either side of racial and class divides. Her best-selling 1996 debut, Tumbling , was set in South Philadelphia during the 1940s and '50s.
NEWS
May 22, 2016
Rittenhouse Writers Reflections on a Fiction Workshop By James Rahn Paul Dry Books. 254 pp. $20 Reviewed by Kathye Fetsko Petrie In 1988, James Rahn - a high school dropout turned Penn graduate turned porn writer turned unemployed Columbia MFA - with great trepidation, slim experience, and not much planning, launched a literary fiction workshop called the Rittenhouse Writers' Group. From the beginning, things go wrong. The door to the Rittenhouse Square building where the first class is to take place is locked.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
Jane Jacobs' The Death and Life of Great American Cities is an urbanist classic that fleshes out the great woman's theories with real-world examples. Because Jacobs lived in the Northeast, her reference points are often the cities from Washington to Boston - most definitely including Philadelphia. Now, as part of the Jane's Walk 2016 series, locals have the opportunity to tour the sights in our city that inspired her (or could have). Jane's Walk events are held across the world on the first weekend in May in honor of her birthday (May 4)
NEWS
April 12, 2016
THREE longtime Daily News editors have won national awards for headline writing from the American Copy Editors Society. The Daily News awards, for headlines written in 2015 at newspapers below 100,000 circulation, went to: * First place, staff portfolio: Joe Berkery, Doug Darroch, Drew McQuade (Seed Money, Acting Our Rage, The New Furor, Shot of Heroine, Chaka Con, Frock Star, To D.I.Y. For, I'm Calling Momcast!, Where the Gun Don't Shine, Prints of Thieves) * First place, individual portfolio: Doug Darroch (We're Shattered, Seed Money, Punching Up the Plot, Where the Gun Don't Shine, To D.I.Y.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | Reviewed by Kathye Fetsko Petrie
Literary Philadelphia A History of Poetry & Prose in the City of Brotherly Love By Thom Nickels Arcadia. 160 pp. $21.99 Reviewed by Kathye Fetsko Petrie Agnes Repplier (1855-1950) was known as the "American Jane Austen," her work praised by no less than Henry James, Walt Whitman, and Edith Wharton. Who knew? "She was world-famous," journalist/author Thom Nickels said recently at a reading of his new book, Literary Philadelphia , at Barnes & Noble on Rittenhouse Square.
NEWS
March 4, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Kevin M. Touhey would speak to football players at Shawnee High School in Medford, he wouldn't talk about winning. "He was trying to get them to trust each other," said Tim Gushue, head football coach there. "He was focusing on the intrinsic value of playing sports. " As the team approached the 2002 season, "we were struggling, a dysfunctional group," Gushue said, until a friend recommended Mr. Touhey. Since 2002, when Mr. Touhey began his weekly motivational sessions during each football season, Gushue said, "we've won six state championships.
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | Reviewed by Paul Davis
The Letters of Ernest Hemingway Volume 3, 1926-1929 Edited by Rena Sanderson, Sandra Spanier, and Robert W. Trogdon Cambridge University Press. 731 pp. $45. Perhaps no 20th-century writer has had a greater influence than Ernest Hemingway. His novels, short stories, and journalism are penetrating and iconic; his personal life, thinly veiled in his fiction, was the stuff of drama and romance. Hemingway was rich, famous, and beloved by millions of readers worldwide.
SPORTS
January 30, 2016 | By Sam Carchidi, STAFF WRITER
Carli Lloyd, recently named the top women's soccer player in the world by FIFA, former heavyweight boxing champion Larry Holmes, and Flyers winger Jake Voracek will be among the headliners at the 112th annual Philadelphia Sports Writers Association's banquet Monday at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Cherry Hill. A limited number of tickets are available at PSWAdinner.com, and some may be available at the door. Fans should check the website for updates. Lloyd, the pride of Delran High and Rutgers, had a hat trick to lead the United States past Japan in the World Cup final.
NEWS
January 24, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Colson Whitehead unnerves me. Every time I think I've found the thread that connects his seven books, from his stunning 1999 debut, The Intuitionist , about elevator examiners, to his best-selling zombie adventure story/existentialist dialectic, Zone One (2011), to 2014's The Noble Hustle: Poker, Beef Jerky & Death , a reportorial account of the World Series of Poker, it slips through my fingers. Whitehead, 46, will speak about his diverse writings at Bryn Mawr College on Feb. 3. "Who is Colson Whitehead?"
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