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NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
PRINCETON - U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia on Monday found himself defending legal writings that some say they find offensive and antigay. Speaking at Princeton University, Scalia was asked by a gay student if it was necessary for him to equate laws banning sodomy with those barring bestiality and murder. "I don't think it's necessary, but I think it's effective," Scalia said, adding that legislative bodies can ban what they believe to be immoral. Scalia has been speaking around the country to promote his new book, Reading Law. His lecture at Princeton came just days after the court agreed to take on two cases that challenge the federal Defense of Marriage Act, which defines marriage as between a man and a woman.
NEWS
April 18, 2011 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The U.S. ambassador to Malta, an important Roman Catholic supporter of President Obama, said Sunday that he would resign after a State Department report criticized him for spending too much time writing and speaking about his religious beliefs. In letters to Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, Douglas Kmiec said he would step down Aug. 15. He said in an interview that no one pressured him to leave. Kmiec was a well-known conservative law professor and commentator before taking the job in 2009.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | By DAVID R. BOLDT
"But have you actually read her writings?" That was trump question that supporters of Lani Guinier would ask. And, tactically, it was a safe one, because just about the only people who read articles in law review journals are law students doing research, and lawyers working in the field who have a lot of spare time (or frequent bouts of insomnia.) A friend of mine who was intimately involved in the organization of the Clinton administration Justice Department said he had never read her writings.
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Rozalind Davis' sister, Yvette, died of a drug overdose three years ago, Davis felt she had few ways to deal with the grief. But Davis, of Kennett Square, has discovered a way to ease the pain: writing. Phyllis McFarlin had spent most of her 59 years rarely speaking unless spoken to. McFarlin, who was born and raised in Malvern, said she had little confidence. That changed after she learned to read and write. Both Davis and McFarlin said the adult literacy program offered through the agencies and libraries that make up the Chester County Adult Literacy Consortium have done much for them, including turning them into published authors.
NEWS
August 12, 1995 | By Nicholas Wishart, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Gloucester County prosecutors said yesterday that Robert "Mudman" Simon, the Warlocks motorcycle gang member charged with the murder of a South Jersey police sergeant, has made admissions of guilt in at least one letter bearing his name and sent from the prison where he's being held. Now, prosecutors and investigators want Simon to complete a writing sample so they can match his style and prose against those found in the letter. "These writings contain certain statements which I believe are incriminatory of defendant Simon in the murder case," county investigator Alex Illas said in a motion filed yesterday in Gloucester County Superior Court.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a lifespan of just 39 years, Lutheran theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer lived the kind of grand drama that becomes legendary. A scion of German affluence, he became a pastor, an outspoken critic of Nazism, and a co-conspirator in a plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler. He was hanged in a Nazi concentration camp less than a month before the end of World War II. But Bonhoeffer's legacy is more than the fascinating story of a martyr's death in a time and place where Christian heroes were few. It is his writings, which insist that authentic faith entails courageous service to the needy and oppressed, that have placed him among the most important religious thinkers of the 20th century.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Montgomery County Court judge refused Friday to dismiss charges against accused child-killer James Lee Troutman despite defense claims that writings seized by police from the defendant's jail cell last year prejudiced the case. After the body of 9-year-old Skyler Kauffman was found at a Souderton apartment complex in May 2011, Troutman was arrested and charged with first- and second-degree murder, kidnapping, and rape. He is held in the Montgomery County prison. Part of his time has been spent writing down his thoughts for his lawyers, psychiatrist, and another inmate.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Anyone familiar with the mildly macabre writings and line drawings of Edward Gorey won't be startled to hear that the principals in "Amphigorey: The Musical" include three vaudevillian bats, a flasher, a naughty sofa, a spectral hippopotamus, a homicidal operagoer and a No. 37 nib for a fountain pen. Nor is the comedy conventional. Instead of Boy-Meets-Girl, we get Bats- Rescue-Girl. We get Insects-Kidnap-Girl. Instead of happily ever after, we get "U is for Una who slipped down a drain/V is for Victor crushed under a train.
NEWS
September 3, 2005 | By Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Rep. Daylin Leach decided yesterday to permanently pull the plug on his Web site that had catalogued years' worth of his humor columns that some readers found funny and others criticized as insensitive and racy. The move - announced in a brief letter on his site, www.leachvent.com - comes a day after the Montgomery County Democrat said he would have his blog back up and running as soon as he found a way to secure it from possible hackers. "After much thought, I have decided to take this site permanently offline," Leach wrote on his site.
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NEWS
May 20, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
PATRICIA LAFFERTY has some rules for pupils learning cursive writing in her class. "Proper posture for proper penmanship," Lafferty told her third-graders yesterday at St. Anthony of Padua Regional Catholic School in South Philadelphia. "Put your feet under your desk, not under your chairs. " They were learning to write a proper cursive "n" in their handbooks. Each page had a sample cursive letter and an area to practice it, with three lines to help guide their writing. The boys and girls watched Lafferty write a lowercase "n" on the chalkboard, which also had the three lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Darlene Sistrunk says writing saved her. After her 20-year-old son, Justin, was murdered in 2009, she took up her pen. She dabbled in poetry intermittently. But it was after attending a book signing, featuring award-winning author Ntozake Shange and hosted by the nonprofit Arts Sanctuary, that she was inspired to share her story. "I was angry that I was still alive," Sistrunk says. "I had to find a way to work through it. It all started with poetry. " Valerie Gay, executive director of Art Sanctuary, says such empowering moments are at the core of the Sanctuary's mission.
SPORTS
April 28, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
RAY DIDINGER and Tommy McDonald go way back. In the late 1950s and early '60s, Didinger - then just a boy - would carry the flanker's helmet after practices at Eagles training camp in Hershey. Who knew that years later, Didinger would spearhead a successful campaign to get McDonald into the Pro Football Hall of Fame and then introduce his boyhood hero at the induction ceremony in Canton, Ohio in 1998? It's the stuff of Hollywood movies. Or in Didinger's case, a play. The former Daily News columnist has penned "Tommy and Me" and Theatre Exile will stage a reading at the Plays and Players Theatre in Center City on May 4 at 7 p.m. "My mom and dad took me on vacation to Hershey for two weeks every year during Eagles training camp," Didinger said yesterday.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* HAPPYISH. 9:30 p.m. Sunday, Showtime. IF "MAD MEN'S" twice-divorced, hard-drinking Don Draper had cared more for his family and less for his job, he might be happier. Or, like angst-ridden adman Thom Payne (Steve Coogan, "Alan Partridge," "Philomena"), the central figure in Showtime's latest series, he might be only "Happyish. " Created several years ago by essayist/novelist (and former ad exec) Shalom Auslander, "Happyish" originally starred Philip Seymour Hoffman, who died of an overdose not long after the pilot.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The story struck a chord with Killeen McCans: Had the 2-year-old's mother not known CPR, the boy who nearly drowned wouldn't have survived. The 15-year-old sophomore at Cardinal O'Hara High School heard the tale from her father, a paramedic, who mentioned that the mother had learned CPR at O'Hara. "It hit me on how much of an impact [CPR training] could have on people's lives," said McCans, who is certified in CPR. At her instigation, 800 O'Hara students filed into the gymnasium of the school in Springfield and Marple Townships on Monday, one period at a time, to learn CPR. "We should have done this a long time ago," said Deputy Chief Eugene Smith of Riddle Hospital EMS, one of the instructors.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE DAILY NEWS continues to reap journalism awards. The latest is the eight first-place and nine second-place honors in the annual Pennsylvania Associated Press Managing Editors writing and photo contest. The winners were announced yesterday - a day after the Daily News celebrated its 90th birthday. The new honors came just a couple of weeks after the newspaper captured the coveted Sweepstakes honor in the 2015 Keystone Press Awards of the Pennsylvania NewsMedia Association by taking nine first-place honors, nine second-place awards and five honorable mentions.
SPORTS
March 27, 2015
SELDOM HAS a man with so much to say been so reluctant to say it. For years, the overriding narrative concerning Kareem Abdul-Jabbar focused less on his Ruthian career and more on his Sphinxian existence. It went like this: Abdul-Jabbar's aloof nature as a player alienated him to peers, teammates, coaches and the press. That alienation grew into resentment and distrust, a dynamic that disqualified Abdul-Jabbar from candidacy when coaching opportunities arose. All of which makes perfect sense . . . except, as it turns out, he has plenty to say. Most recently, he has been saying it with original fiction.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Katlyn Grasso got to Penn knowing she could be a leader, her confidence fed by supportive parents and her all-girls high school. But she saw that many other young women were hesitant about raising their hands in class and volunteering for leadership roles. The 21-year-old Buffalo native has a plan to begin to change that - and Penn is going to fund it. Grasso is among five students announced Wednesday as the winners of the university's first "President's Engagement Prize. " Penn president Amy Gutmann created the awards in August with funding from the university's board of trustees.
NEWS
March 20, 2015
THINK OF "Dirty Dancing," and it's likely the first thought conjured is of "(I've Had) The Time of My Life," the hearts-take-flight duet sung by Bill Medley (of The Righteous Brothers) and Jennifer Warnes that is the signature tune from the small-budget 1987 flick that today stands as a pop-culture totem of the Reagan administration era. But the Oscar-and-Grammy-winning song's lyricist is far too modest to claim sole responsibility for the success of the film whose stage version hits the Academy of Music Tuesday for a 13-night, 16-performance run. "For me, it's more than just the movie and just the song," offered Franke Previte (pronounced PREV-it)
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol Harrison walks into her mother's nursing-home room, raises the blinds, lets in the morning light. "Hey, Mom, hey, good morning. " The daughter's voice is tender, as if waking a child. She kisses her mother's cheek. Strokes her hair. "Mom, hey, it's Carol Ann. It's Carol Ann. I'm here to see you. " No response. Grace Ward, 90, is under a blanket, in a recliner, eyes closed. She has had Alzheimer's disease for 15 years. For the last five, she hasn't uttered a coherent sentence, or recognized her daughter.
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