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NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
PRINCETON - U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia on Monday found himself defending legal writings that some say they find offensive and antigay. Speaking at Princeton University, Scalia was asked by a gay student if it was necessary for him to equate laws banning sodomy with those barring bestiality and murder. "I don't think it's necessary, but I think it's effective," Scalia said, adding that legislative bodies can ban what they believe to be immoral. Scalia has been speaking around the country to promote his new book, Reading Law. His lecture at Princeton came just days after the court agreed to take on two cases that challenge the federal Defense of Marriage Act, which defines marriage as between a man and a woman.
NEWS
April 18, 2011 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The U.S. ambassador to Malta, an important Roman Catholic supporter of President Obama, said Sunday that he would resign after a State Department report criticized him for spending too much time writing and speaking about his religious beliefs. In letters to Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, Douglas Kmiec said he would step down Aug. 15. He said in an interview that no one pressured him to leave. Kmiec was a well-known conservative law professor and commentator before taking the job in 2009.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | By DAVID R. BOLDT
"But have you actually read her writings?" That was trump question that supporters of Lani Guinier would ask. And, tactically, it was a safe one, because just about the only people who read articles in law review journals are law students doing research, and lawyers working in the field who have a lot of spare time (or frequent bouts of insomnia.) A friend of mine who was intimately involved in the organization of the Clinton administration Justice Department said he had never read her writings.
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Rozalind Davis' sister, Yvette, died of a drug overdose three years ago, Davis felt she had few ways to deal with the grief. But Davis, of Kennett Square, has discovered a way to ease the pain: writing. Phyllis McFarlin had spent most of her 59 years rarely speaking unless spoken to. McFarlin, who was born and raised in Malvern, said she had little confidence. That changed after she learned to read and write. Both Davis and McFarlin said the adult literacy program offered through the agencies and libraries that make up the Chester County Adult Literacy Consortium have done much for them, including turning them into published authors.
NEWS
August 12, 1995 | By Nicholas Wishart, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Gloucester County prosecutors said yesterday that Robert "Mudman" Simon, the Warlocks motorcycle gang member charged with the murder of a South Jersey police sergeant, has made admissions of guilt in at least one letter bearing his name and sent from the prison where he's being held. Now, prosecutors and investigators want Simon to complete a writing sample so they can match his style and prose against those found in the letter. "These writings contain certain statements which I believe are incriminatory of defendant Simon in the murder case," county investigator Alex Illas said in a motion filed yesterday in Gloucester County Superior Court.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a lifespan of just 39 years, Lutheran theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer lived the kind of grand drama that becomes legendary. A scion of German affluence, he became a pastor, an outspoken critic of Nazism, and a co-conspirator in a plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler. He was hanged in a Nazi concentration camp less than a month before the end of World War II. But Bonhoeffer's legacy is more than the fascinating story of a martyr's death in a time and place where Christian heroes were few. It is his writings, which insist that authentic faith entails courageous service to the needy and oppressed, that have placed him among the most important religious thinkers of the 20th century.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Montgomery County Court judge refused Friday to dismiss charges against accused child-killer James Lee Troutman despite defense claims that writings seized by police from the defendant's jail cell last year prejudiced the case. After the body of 9-year-old Skyler Kauffman was found at a Souderton apartment complex in May 2011, Troutman was arrested and charged with first- and second-degree murder, kidnapping, and rape. He is held in the Montgomery County prison. Part of his time has been spent writing down his thoughts for his lawyers, psychiatrist, and another inmate.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Anyone familiar with the mildly macabre writings and line drawings of Edward Gorey won't be startled to hear that the principals in "Amphigorey: The Musical" include three vaudevillian bats, a flasher, a naughty sofa, a spectral hippopotamus, a homicidal operagoer and a No. 37 nib for a fountain pen. Nor is the comedy conventional. Instead of Boy-Meets-Girl, we get Bats- Rescue-Girl. We get Insects-Kidnap-Girl. Instead of happily ever after, we get "U is for Una who slipped down a drain/V is for Victor crushed under a train.
NEWS
September 3, 2005 | By Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Rep. Daylin Leach decided yesterday to permanently pull the plug on his Web site that had catalogued years' worth of his humor columns that some readers found funny and others criticized as insensitive and racy. The move - announced in a brief letter on his site, www.leachvent.com - comes a day after the Montgomery County Democrat said he would have his blog back up and running as soon as he found a way to secure it from possible hackers. "After much thought, I have decided to take this site permanently offline," Leach wrote on his site.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
'Tonight, we commune with the dead," declared the intermission lecturer, Philip Jones, a Babylonian specialist. Is that so different from many classical music concerts? This occasion was different. It was called "Ancient Echoes," a special concert at the Penn Museum's Chinese Rotunda on Tuesday, surrounded by Tang Dynasty sculptures. Egyptian sarcophagi lay in the next room. The event was special, indeed. The rotunda is a 90-foot-high dome: Acoustic spaces this diffuse and reverberant are so tough on preexisting repertoire that two new pieces were written for the space.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 12, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Melissa Shang's transformation from a quiet Chester County fifth grader into a national disability advocate began with a battle over a doll. Born with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a neurological disorder that causes muscular atrophy in her legs and arms, Melissa wanted to see herself in her favorite toy. Almost three years ago, when she was 10 and her sister, Eva, was 17, they started a widely shared online petition asking the maker of American Girl...
NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Lynn Rosen, For The Inquirer
Ian McEwan was ranked by the Times of London among the 50 greatest British writers since 1945. His novels, including Amsterdam , which won the 1998 Man Booker Prize, and Atonement , a 2001 novel made into a 2007 Oscar-winning movie, have attracted a large worldwide audience. McEwan visits the Free Library on Wednesday for a conversation about his new novel, Nutshell . The book is based on the story of Hamlet , told from the point of view of a fetus. McEwan talked about his new book and his writing life.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Ed Barkowitz and Janaki Chadha, STAFF WRITERS
The question to the kids Tuesday morning was simple, yet profound: What would they do if they were president? The answers — given in essay form by Philadelphia students ages 7 to 17 — were compelling. Many answered that they would end racism or solve the issue of contentious police relations in their communities. Maybe they were light on specifics, but they were full of emotion. Or humor: One boy, sweltering in the sun with uncounted others, wrote that if he were president, he'd be writing in the air-conditioning.
NEWS
June 20, 2016
This fan thought that if Diana Gabaldon, author of the "Outlander" book series, was writing the episode, there might be some sweet Jamie and Claire together time in "Vengeance is Mine," episode 11 in the Starz TV series based on her books. Ha! Should have known better. Not that there isn't some of that - and let's face it, actors Caitriona Balfe and Sam Heughan can pack a lot of emotion into a glance or a quick before-battle kiss between their characters - but, as DG explains here , "Outlander" was never meant to be a romance, in the modern sense anyway.
NEWS
June 19, 2016
Reading and Writing Cancer How Words Heal By Susan Gubar W.W. Norton. 240 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Janet Falon Words heal. Reading them. Writing them. Both. In Reading and Writing Cancer by Susan Gubar, you're taught how to use words to write about your cancer experience in a healing way, and how to read and be enriched by the words of writers (and some visual artists) whose work springs from their own encounter with this ubiquitous disease.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
A YOUNG mother gives up her newborn baby boy for adoption only months before her own high school graduation. The mother is 17. Nearly 50 years later, the mother, Victoria Huggins Peurifoy, tells the story in a letter to a son she saw only once. In a poem based off a family photograph, which includes a little girl, Carol Richardson McCullough writes of the sister she never met. The toddler died before McCullough was born. These are samples of the stories and poems collected in two new books, Anthology 2 and Portraits Through Time.
NEWS
May 29, 2016 | Paul Jablow, FOR THE INQUIRER
The dentist and the ex-cop first met about five years ago at a pain management seminar at Tufts University. "He asked me what I was doing there," recalls Carlos Aquino, who spent 23 years on the Philadelphia police force before retiring in 1995 as a sergeant specializing in narcotics investigations. "When I told him, he understood. " Elliot Hersh, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania dental school who specializes in pharmacology, understood so well that he soon had Aquino lecturing his students on the dangers of overprescribing painkillers, including opioids such as Percocet and Vicodin.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Regarding the 51/2-week strike against Verizon by nearly 40,000 union members: After talking to company and union leaders, "we continue to expect the strike to end relatively soon," but it will still reduce this year's earnings for Verizon by around $200 million, or a nickel a share, writes New York-based telecom analyst Barry Sine in a report to clients of Philadelphia-based Drexel, Hamilton & Co. Both labor and management say "a solution is possible,"...
NEWS
May 9, 2016
Beth Kephart is the author 21 books, including "This Is the Story of You" (Chronicle Books) I may have been an angsty adolescent, but my darkest secret involved nothing more than this: a box of watercolors, a drugstore paintbrush, a Bic pen, and a series of blank books with Naugahyde covers. I painted the pages of those books to buckling saturation. I waited, impatiently, for them to dry. Afterward, alone on my roof or in the shade of a tree, I Bic-scratched into those multitonal hues such awe-invoking grandeur as this: A daffodil dons her yellow skirt, Smoothes out the ruffled pleats of the hem, Places her fringed bonnet on her tiny head . . . and goes out for tea. Clearly I was just inches away from a career as the next Jack Kerouac, the future Allen Ginsberg, the once-and-always Emily Dickinson.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
'Tonight, we commune with the dead," declared the intermission lecturer, Philip Jones, a Babylonian specialist. Is that so different from many classical music concerts? This occasion was different. It was called "Ancient Echoes," a special concert at the Penn Museum's Chinese Rotunda on Tuesday, surrounded by Tang Dynasty sculptures. Egyptian sarcophagi lay in the next room. The event was special, indeed. The rotunda is a 90-foot-high dome: Acoustic spaces this diffuse and reverberant are so tough on preexisting repertoire that two new pieces were written for the space.
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