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Wrong Number

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NEWS
July 29, 2003
BY ANY MEASURE, the national "do-not-call" registry has been a success. The list of people who do not want to be bothered by telemarketers has grown to more than 28 million people. Come October telemarketers will have to consult the list before they can call someone around dinner time. The list has been so successful, telemarketers are now suing to have it stopped. The American Teleservices Association, which sued the Federal Trade Commission to stop enforcement of the anti-telemarketing law, is now also going after the Federal Communications Commission.
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | By Michael Lear-Olimpi, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
If you try to call Hi-Nella Borough Hall but get Anna Kendall in Magnolia instead, do not hang up. She likes to talk to people, and she will give you the number you want. Kendall, 69, said that she and her husband, Lloyd, 78, got "a call or two every couple of days" for Hi-Nella Borough Hall and that the number of calls increased at tax and voting time. She said the calls came because the Kendalls' telephone number was different from one at Hi-Nella Borough Hall by just one digit.
NEWS
February 19, 2010
YOUR FEB. 11 EDITORIAL on student loan reform ("College Proposal No-Brainer") cited an inaccurate and overstated New York Times/Center for Responsive Politics calculation of Sallie Mae's lobbying expenses. The Times has since corrected this figure. Here's what they said: Correction: An article on Feb. 5 about the student lending industry's lobbying against changes to the loan system, using information from the Center for Responsive Politics, a private campaign-finance research group, misstated the amount of money the student lender Sallie Mae spent on federal lobbying in recent years.
NEWS
July 30, 1997 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two Maryland men accidentally dialed 911, quickly summoning police, early yesterday while trying to break open two pay telephones, authorities said. Although neither man could be heard talking by emergency dispatchers, the call recorded the number of one of the phones, and it was determined to be a "911 hangup" call, authorities said. Officers Joseph Bryant and Christopher Crabtree went to the pay phones in a parking lot outside Campie's Ice Cream store on Route 168 in the Hilltop section.
NEWS
February 11, 1997
Cold and lost in an unfamiliar part of New Jersey, an 18-year-old Camden man did what his entire generation has been trained to do: call 911 for help. The police response? He was handcuffed, questioned and arrested - for improper use of 911. Rashon Jackson, who is black, thinks the cause of this incident in New Hanover was racism. So do a lot of other folks. A lost white youth, they say, would not have been treated in the same manner. New Hanover officials deny that - unconvincingly.
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | BY MIKE ROYKO
In an aggressively cheerful voice, the caller said: "Mr. Royko? And how are you feeling this morning?" I said: "Who are you and what do you want?" That's the way I usually respond to bubbly people who phone and ask how I am feeling. How I'm feeling was none of his business, unless he was my physician, which he wasn't. And I knew his question wasn't sincere. Strangers who call and ask how you are feeling really don't care. They almost always try to sell you something or put the arm on you for a favor.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By Jerry W. Byrd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ted Manning has lived in Cheltenham Township for four months and has never dialed 887-6200. So far, no emergency has arisen to cause the 27-year-old auto mechanic, originally of West Philadelphia, to summon fire, police or rescue personnel. The problem is, even if Manning were to need help fast, he would not dial 887-6200. "If something happens," Manning said matter-of-factly, "I'll call 911. I don't know that other number. " That "other" number is the only one that will put him directly in touch with the emergency dispatcher for Cheltenham Township.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 31, 2014
A story Thursday on Barrymore Award nominations gave the wrong number for the Wilma Theater's nominations. It was 10.
NEWS
January 16, 2013
Gov. Corbett's zeal to privatize management of the Pennsylvania Lottery raises more doubts about the deal, even as it increases the likelihood that the state will needlessly hand over the hugely profitable games - and a share of the winnings - to a British firm. Corbett's decision, announced Friday, to let sole-bidder Camelot Global Services PA take over the 41-year-old lottery was a snub to Harrisburg lawmakers, inasmuch as the Republican-controlled legislature was poised to bring the first real public oversight to the deal.
NEWS
January 12, 2013 | By Daniel Deagler
By Daniel Deagler Except for the rare centenarian among us, 2013 marks the first time we will face the number 13 on a daily basis. There is no 13th month, and the 13th day of each month comes and goes largely unnoticed unless it falls on a Friday. But this year, 13 is there every day - every time we write the date or look at the calendar or glance at the bottom righthand corner of a computer screen. This year is not 13, of course; it only contains 13. There was a year 13 - though quite unbeknownst to anyone living in it, as the Anno Domini system would not become standard until after A.D. 800, and even then it was off by about four years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Joanna's August 2010 job interview at a South Philadelphia doctor's office included a question she didn't expect: "Are you married or are you single?" "Single," the nurse-practitioner told the man she would work with for the next couple of years. "We'll get you married," he told her. Four months later, Joanna was sweeping through the three exam rooms, hunting for the one office thermometer. She walked in on a fully clothed, and, she couldn't help but notice, very good-looking patient.
NEWS
October 29, 2010 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
The world of porn wasn't the only industry rocked by Wednesday's FBI raid on the Center City adult-entertainment conglomerate National A-1 Advertising Inc. The people who track, sell, buy and trade toll-free numbers were atwitter yesterday as news spread of the sweep, which affected not only businesses such as a phone-sex line and porn websites, but subsidiaries that buy up toll-free numbers. And National A-1 does it aggressively, said Bill Quimby, founder of Tollfreenumbers.com.
NEWS
July 12, 2010
Traditional landlines may be going the way of the rotary phone, but Trenton has been doing its part to keep the phone companies in business. An audit released last week found the state government was paying for more than 18,000 unused and unnecessary landlines, at a cost of $2.8 million a year. The audit also found almost 1,400 unneeded wireless devices, one of which was assigned to an employee who had quit six years earlier. Along with several disconnected data lines and $250,000 worth of unnecessary calls to directory assistance, the waste on phone services amounted to nearly $3.5 million a year.
NEWS
June 26, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Edwards ' estranged wife, Elizabeth , and their daughter Cate , 28, are doing the media rounds to chat about the former vice presidential candidate's infidelity. Elizabeth, 60, who discusses the end of her 32-year marriage in her book Resilience , will hawk the paperback issue Wednesday on Today . In an essay for People, Cate, who clerks for a federal judge in Washington, addresses her mom's courage and her fight with cancer. "There are the things she taught without words," she writes, "how to continue to live your life on your own terms when it somehow becomes savaged by people you never invited into it. " Mel vs. Oksana . . . Oksana Grigorieva , 40, who allegedly shattered Mel Gibson 's 30-year marriage to Robyn Denise Moore , has taken out a restraining order against Mel, claiming he's been violent with her, TMZ says.
NEWS
February 19, 2010
YOUR FEB. 11 EDITORIAL on student loan reform ("College Proposal No-Brainer") cited an inaccurate and overstated New York Times/Center for Responsive Politics calculation of Sallie Mae's lobbying expenses. The Times has since corrected this figure. Here's what they said: Correction: An article on Feb. 5 about the student lending industry's lobbying against changes to the loan system, using information from the Center for Responsive Politics, a private campaign-finance research group, misstated the amount of money the student lender Sallie Mae spent on federal lobbying in recent years.
NEWS
June 8, 2009 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Because of a mixup at the Pennsylvania Lottery, people may have been checking the wrong numbers while looking for a $200,000 winning Powerball ticket that expires next week. Yes, there is an expiring $200,000 prize, and, yes, the ticket was purchased at Choi Food & Beer at 3987 Ford Rd. in Philadelphia. But the numbers quoted were wrong. The correct numbers are 9, 12, 31, 39 and 52 . In a recent news release, the lottery apparently repeated a set of numbers from an earlier announcement, about an expiring $400,000 ticket purchased in Cumberland County, Pa. That prize, from the May 28, 2008, drawing, was claimed with just one week left by Brenda Stover, after her husband saw a news report and suggested she check her shoebox full of tickets.
SPORTS
May 15, 2009 | By JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO For the Daily News
The chink, chink, chink sounds bounce off the empty gymnasium walls, waft through the halls and down the stairwells and out into the cool spring evening breeze. If you follow the noise, it will lead you to Vasek Hasik, hitting baseballs off a black batting tee into a lacrosse net. He seems to carry that tee with him almost everywhere on the Westtown School campus. He wears no batting gloves, which might explain the calluses that cover his hands. Chink, chink, chink . . . he just keeps hitting.
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