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Wrong Thing

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NEWS
June 21, 2004
YOU HAVE TO hand it to Bill Clinton. Using four little words, blowing away any whiff of psycho-pop B.S., he articulated what often motivates people to do the wrong thing: "Just because I could. " Stupid, but honest. And sadly reminiscent of the arrogance that comes with power. Clinton has said he regrets his Monica mistake, which almost shattered his family. When will George Bush admit his mistakes, which have shattered so many more families?
NEWS
January 24, 2000
Ed Rendell was a hell of a deal maker, but no demon for details. As an example we offer the troubled - and troubling - DisneyQuest development. This multi-million-dollar project promised to bring suburbanites and their kids back to Center City with an entertainment center that screamed Disney. It seemed like an enticing project in 1998 and worth the city's financial support. But so far all that developers, headed by Ken Goldenberg, have delivered is a giant hole at 8th and Market.
NEWS
October 12, 1989
DOES THAT MEAN PHILADELPHIA IS NO. 11? The present here is not so rich as the past, but William Penn's city is perking up. It is too often remembered for a wandering shipful of garbage a few years back rather than for the inviting urban landscape and expanding skyline. Quality of life is excellent, with fine museums and restaurants and one of the greenest downtowns in America. Housing is affordable (a home costs $115,399). Impressive projects are polishing the city's image.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1998 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are advantages, bassist William Parker said, to being an outfit that has played together for almost two decades. Parker's group, Other Dimensions in Music, works in a free-jazz mode, but doesn't necessarily stay there all the time. It does, more often than not, play without charts. "In a quartet, everyone in the band has to be able to navigate second by second to make it work," Parker said. "You start with silence, and you are doing OK until you hit the first note. After that one, the second one is the most important, and everything you do after that has to be perfect.
NEWS
May 24, 1999 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
It's the first thing you notice about Philadelphia Police Officer Bernard Turner. He has a good face. Kind. Gentle. Sincere. Serene. Friendly. Open. Soft brown eyes that inspire trust. A kind face is not a requirement of the job - being a Philadelphia police officer - but it's a good start. It's also comforting to know that Turner has a heart to match the gentleness of his face. His goodness makes him especially well-suited for his job as a cop working mostly with juvenile offenders.
NEWS
January 1, 1987 | By Howard Gensler, Special to The Inquirer
After suffering seven straight blowouts, including Monday night's 63-44 pasting at the hands of the Overbrook Panthers in the consolation game of the Cardinal O'Hara holiday tournament, Academy Park coach Rick Pergolini is searching for answers. Plagued by a multitude of mental errors that his small squad has been unable to overcome, Pergolini is hoping that the Knights will be able to turn things around by the time of their next league contest, Tuesday at Glen Mills. "We've developed a mental attitude that it's OK to lose," said Pergolini, whose team missed its first 16 shots from the floor against Overbrook.
NEWS
July 26, 2000
Needless to say, President Clinton fell short of his 1992 vow to run "the most ethical administration in history. " Still, he deserves credit for blocking the revolving door between policy-making in office and lobbying on K Street. Unfortunately, as the lame duck begins to waddle to the exit, this ethics policy may get weakened. Job-hunting Clintonites are pressing for that. Such a change would be one more mark on a tarnished record. When Mr. Clinton took office, federal ethics law required only a one-year "cooling off" period before an ex-official could lobby his or her former agency.
SPORTS
August 15, 1997 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
Ray Rhodes longs for the days when tacklers could tackle the way they were taught without fear of retribution. The day after Denver linebacker Bill Romanowski was fined $20,000 for a hit that broke the jaw of Carolina quarterback Kerry Collins, Rhodes couldn't help but sympathize with "Romo. " It left the Eagles coach misty for the days before the recent crackdown on helmet-to-helmet hits - the days when he played in the 1970s and in 1980. "Romanowski [might become] a passive football player," Rhodes said of the former Eagle at training camp yesterday.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
GET THE LEAD OUT. There's a fast, easy and inexpensive test that promises to help consumers detect excessive lead levels in ceramic dishes, teapots and coffee cups. Food and Drug Administration scientists who developed the test say serious cases of chronic lead poisoning have been reported in people who repeatedly ate or drank out of improperly glazed ceramic kitchenware. In the new test, a strip of filter paper wetted with citric acid is placed on a ceramic dish. If the paper turns dark pink or red after 30 minutes, it indicates the dish is releasing lead.
NEWS
October 17, 1997 | By Molly Ivins
This year's Forbes 400 list of the wealthiest people in America includes 170 billionaires, and you had to be worth $475 million to get on the list at all. About 36 million people in this country are living below the poverty level, and that does not count millions more of the working poor. The combined wealth of the Forbes 400 increased by 31 percent last year. Bill Gates, richest man in America, more than doubled his net worth from $18.5 billion to $39.8 billion. It would take the median U.S. household earning $35,000 a year 600,000 years to make as much as Gates did last year.
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NEWS
August 22, 2014
TO THE EDITOR: My name is Christine Flowers and I am an immigration lawyer. I am also an avid reader of the People Paper, and love your Letters to the Editor section. They're usually a lot more articulate than the rants you read at Philly.com in the comments section. I'm sure the columnists have stopped reading those online firebombs long ago. If they haven't, they should. Every now and then, though, it seems as if some of that Philly.com vibe spills over onto the printed page.
NEWS
June 19, 2007
It's true, says Christopher Pearo. When you think you're about to die, your life really does flash before your eyes. Pearo, 36, a newspaper-delivery driver for the Daily News and Inquirer , had just been robbed of $15 by two assailants and shot in the neck as he deposited papers yesterday in a locked drop-box at a deli at 64th Street and Buist Avenue, Southwest Philadelphia. It was 3:40 a.m., the streets were empty, and the movie of his life played in his mind. What Pearo saw, as he ran down Buist Avenue screaming for help, were those he loved and what his death would do to them.
NEWS
June 21, 2004
YOU HAVE TO hand it to Bill Clinton. Using four little words, blowing away any whiff of psycho-pop B.S., he articulated what often motivates people to do the wrong thing: "Just because I could. " Stupid, but honest. And sadly reminiscent of the arrogance that comes with power. Clinton has said he regrets his Monica mistake, which almost shattered his family. When will George Bush admit his mistakes, which have shattered so many more families?
NEWS
July 26, 2000
Needless to say, President Clinton fell short of his 1992 vow to run "the most ethical administration in history. " Still, he deserves credit for blocking the revolving door between policy-making in office and lobbying on K Street. Unfortunately, as the lame duck begins to waddle to the exit, this ethics policy may get weakened. Job-hunting Clintonites are pressing for that. Such a change would be one more mark on a tarnished record. When Mr. Clinton took office, federal ethics law required only a one-year "cooling off" period before an ex-official could lobby his or her former agency.
NEWS
July 3, 2000
"It's so heartaching when people come up on your property to take a piece of your house. " That's what Lillie Mae Williams, 74, of Olney, told the Daily News about waking up one morning and discovering that a piece of her house - and her life - had been stolen during the night. In this case, the brazen and heartless thief had taken a valuable architectural column from her home by using an auto jack to prop up her front porch. Every day, in every neighborhood, residents are hit by the same manner of callous and destructive thievery: irreplaceable wrought-iron gates, rain gutters and downspouts, finely-crafted antique windows and, in one celebrated and especially outrageous case recently, an entire brick sidewalk at a historic cemetery in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 24, 2000
Ed Rendell was a hell of a deal maker, but no demon for details. As an example we offer the troubled - and troubling - DisneyQuest development. This multi-million-dollar project promised to bring suburbanites and their kids back to Center City with an entertainment center that screamed Disney. It seemed like an enticing project in 1998 and worth the city's financial support. But so far all that developers, headed by Ken Goldenberg, have delivered is a giant hole at 8th and Market.
NEWS
May 24, 1999 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
It's the first thing you notice about Philadelphia Police Officer Bernard Turner. He has a good face. Kind. Gentle. Sincere. Serene. Friendly. Open. Soft brown eyes that inspire trust. A kind face is not a requirement of the job - being a Philadelphia police officer - but it's a good start. It's also comforting to know that Turner has a heart to match the gentleness of his face. His goodness makes him especially well-suited for his job as a cop working mostly with juvenile offenders.
SPORTS
October 4, 1998 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They are the Boston Red Sox. They do the wrong thing, it turns into the right thing. They do the right thing, it turns into the wrong thing. They are the Boston Red Sox. They are one of baseball's great franchises. They're just allergic to the month of October. They lost another tragic October baseball game yesterday, 2-1, to the Cleveland Indians. They lost another tragic October postseason series along with it, three games to one. For Cleveland, that means a trip to play the Yankees in the American League Championship Series.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1998 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are advantages, bassist William Parker said, to being an outfit that has played together for almost two decades. Parker's group, Other Dimensions in Music, works in a free-jazz mode, but doesn't necessarily stay there all the time. It does, more often than not, play without charts. "In a quartet, everyone in the band has to be able to navigate second by second to make it work," Parker said. "You start with silence, and you are doing OK until you hit the first note. After that one, the second one is the most important, and everything you do after that has to be perfect.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
When the folks who hand out Grammy awards were looking for a design for the statuette, they should have chosen an empty cup. However the awards were originally imagined in the beginning, they have become a symbol of ephemera, a prize for the passing fancy. This culture hardly needs to be reminded of the value it places on material to be thrown away, but the awards reinforce the idea that recordings, the only means we have to give music some longevity, should be valued for their triviality.
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