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NEWS
October 31, 1997 | By Adrienne Lu, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Moving in to fill the gap left by the ending of classical programming on WFLN-FM this fall, a New Jersey community college's radio station wants to establish a satellite station in Coatesville. Within the next few years, the Trenton-based non-commercial "Classical Network" could fill the airwaves from Coatesville to Philadelphia with the likes of Schubert and Chopin by establishing two or more translators between the two cities, WWFM-FM general manager Walt Gradzki said yesterday.
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
WWFM, the 11-station classical network based in Trenton whose signal has a limited reach in Philadelphia, will begin to broadcast classical music around the clock tomorrow at midnight. For the past six years, the public station owned and operated by Mercer County Community College has carried a classical format from 5 a.m. till midnight, when it goes off the air. It is accessible at 107.9 FM in Center City and 89.1 FM in Trenton. "We've always been licensed as a 24-hour station, but we couldn't afford the people," said WWFM general manager Walt Gradzki, who explained that in January, an FCC regulation that required a station, for emergency reasons, to be staffed whenever it was broadcasting was altered.
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON JUNCTION - The brass band couldn't make it. The banners outside the studio were for an athletic event at Mercer County Community College. Thus, in its own unglamorous way, did WWFM-FM debut its significant new show on Aug. 4 that takes the Curtis Institute of Music out of its Field Concert Hall headquarters and onto the airwaves every Saturday at noon. You'd think this radio milestone would have been promoted with the best-known piece ever written at Curtis, Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings . "Nah!
NEWS
September 9, 1997 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Classical-music lovers who live in Philadelphia's western suburbs have been phoning Walter Gradzki in New Jersey in hopes he'll send some music their way. But Gradzki, general manager of Mercer County Community College radio station WWFM-FM, which plays only classical music, has to disappoint them. "It's making me crazy," said Gradzki. "I'd love to be able to send our signal to Montgomery County. But we can't. " WWFM, he explains, is a 3,000-watt public radio station, launched at MCCC 16 years ago. Since then, it has increased its range and listening audience by putting up translators - devices that transmit its satellite signal - in 13 locations, including Center City, Atlantic City and Allentown, Pa. But WWFM can't put up a translator in an area just because some people living there would like to hear it - not if its signal would interfere with an existing one. WWFM can't interfere with any of the larger radio stations here - or any little broadcaster either.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1997 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an unusual deal crafted by its musicians, the Philadelphia Orchestra will resume national radio broadcasts Friday after an absence of almost eight years. Nearly 300 commercial and public radio stations have signed to carry the new 13-week series of two-hour shows offered by Chicago's WFMT Fine Arts Network. No sponsor has agreed to underwrite the cost of the broadcasts; the Philadelphia Orchestra Association itself will cover the expense of paying the musicians, estimated at $150,000.
NEWS
June 18, 1998
In the WWFM-WRTI slugfest, the listeners lose I was disheartened to read about the competition between WRTI-FM (90.1) and WWFM-FM (89.1) to serve the Philadelphia area with quality classical programming (Inquirer, June 12). My parents did not listen to classical music, and I owe my love for it to my exposure to quality classical radio while I was growing up in New York. I can't emphasize how important such radio is for the Philadelphia area's current and future music lovers. With WFLN's demise, I and others were forced to search for alternatives.
NEWS
September 4, 1997 | By Kevin Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it comes to radio and television, you've just landed in the nation's fourth-largest media market. And that means big-time choices for your listening and viewing pleasure. Here's a summary of what's on the dials. AM radio: 560 Religious talk WFIL 610 Sports talk WIP 800 Religious talk, gospel WTMR 860 Tropical Latin WTEL 900 Hispanic urban WURD 950 Nostalgia, big band WPEN 990 Contemporary gospel WZZD 1060 All-news KYW 1210 Talk WPHT 1340 Black-oriented talk WHAT 1480 Inspirational-information WDAS 1490 Middle of the road WBCB 1540 Ethnic WNWR FM radio: 88.1 Diversified WNJT 88.5 Adult album alternative WXPN 89.1 Classical, jazz WWFM 89.7 Varied WGLS 90.1 Jazz, special WRTI 90.9 National Public Radio WHYY 91.7 Jazz, rock, special WKDU 92.5 Country music WXTU 93.3 Album-oriented rock WMMR 94.1 Rock WYSP 95.7 Classical music WFLN 96.5 Talk WWDB 98.1 Oldies WOGL 98.9 Urban contemporary WUSL 100.3 Modern rock WPLY 101.1 Adult contemporary WBEB 101.5 Contemporary and classic hits WKXW 102.1 Contemporary and dance hits WIOQ 102.9 Classic hits WMGK 103.9 Urban Contemporary WPHI 104.5 Adult contemporary hits WYXR 105.3 Urban adult contemporary WDAS 106.1 Smooth jazz WJJZ 106.9 Religious, music WKDN 107.7 Big band, talk WSNJ Local television: KYW, Channel 3 (CBS)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1996 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Metropolitan Opera will be on the radio here starting Dec. 7, but listeners will have to retrain themselves to find it. The often-sold WFLN-FM (95.7), long the source of live Met broadcasts, announced last summer that it would abandon the Saturday afternoon broadcasts because its rating were only half of that owner's goals. The station also changed its format to favor shorter classical music pieces and semiclassical fare. Although it was sold again after that announcement, the new owner, Evergreen Media, has followed the format established by former owner Secret Communications, of Cincinnati.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More guerrilla warfare between those hated rivals Eagle 106 and Q-102 - and this time it's turning into blood sport. The latest skirmish broke out Tuesday when WIOQ-FM (102.1), currently down in the ratings against WEGX-FM (106.1), went on the air with a promotional spot featuring none other than 'EGX morning man John Lander. "Hi, this is John Lander on Q-102, the No. 1 station for music and fun," says the upbeat spot that aired all Tuesday and Wednesday. Turns out that Lander, who knocks down about $400,000 a year at Eagle 106, used to host a syndicated national show.
NEWS
February 19, 2004
In the wild, big eats little - or tramples it without noticing. In the world of broadcast radio, the existence of community and student-run school radio stations can be just as brutish and short. That's why the plight of WHHS-FM (107.9) - billed as "the nation's longest running high school radio station" - cries out for a rescue. Run by student volunteers at Haverford High School, the station could be silenced in a matter of months, after 55 years. Federal regulators have ceded its spot on the FM dial to a commercial broadcaster, Radio One Inc., which plans to add its third Philadelphia-area station.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON JUNCTION - The brass band couldn't make it. The banners outside the studio were for an athletic event at Mercer County Community College. Thus, in its own unglamorous way, did WWFM-FM debut its significant new show on Aug. 4 that takes the Curtis Institute of Music out of its Field Concert Hall headquarters and onto the airwaves every Saturday at noon. You'd think this radio milestone would have been promoted with the best-known piece ever written at Curtis, Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings . "Nah!
NEWS
February 19, 2004
In the wild, big eats little - or tramples it without noticing. In the world of broadcast radio, the existence of community and student-run school radio stations can be just as brutish and short. That's why the plight of WHHS-FM (107.9) - billed as "the nation's longest running high school radio station" - cries out for a rescue. Run by student volunteers at Haverford High School, the station could be silenced in a matter of months, after 55 years. Federal regulators have ceded its spot on the FM dial to a commercial broadcaster, Radio One Inc., which plans to add its third Philadelphia-area station.
NEWS
June 18, 1998
In the WWFM-WRTI slugfest, the listeners lose I was disheartened to read about the competition between WRTI-FM (90.1) and WWFM-FM (89.1) to serve the Philadelphia area with quality classical programming (Inquirer, June 12). My parents did not listen to classical music, and I owe my love for it to my exposure to quality classical radio while I was growing up in New York. I can't emphasize how important such radio is for the Philadelphia area's current and future music lovers. With WFLN's demise, I and others were forced to search for alternatives.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1997 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an unusual deal crafted by its musicians, the Philadelphia Orchestra will resume national radio broadcasts Friday after an absence of almost eight years. Nearly 300 commercial and public radio stations have signed to carry the new 13-week series of two-hour shows offered by Chicago's WFMT Fine Arts Network. No sponsor has agreed to underwrite the cost of the broadcasts; the Philadelphia Orchestra Association itself will cover the expense of paying the musicians, estimated at $150,000.
NEWS
October 31, 1997 | By Adrienne Lu, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Moving in to fill the gap left by the ending of classical programming on WFLN-FM this fall, a New Jersey community college's radio station wants to establish a satellite station in Coatesville. Within the next few years, the Trenton-based non-commercial "Classical Network" could fill the airwaves from Coatesville to Philadelphia with the likes of Schubert and Chopin by establishing two or more translators between the two cities, WWFM-FM general manager Walt Gradzki said yesterday.
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
WWFM, the 11-station classical network based in Trenton whose signal has a limited reach in Philadelphia, will begin to broadcast classical music around the clock tomorrow at midnight. For the past six years, the public station owned and operated by Mercer County Community College has carried a classical format from 5 a.m. till midnight, when it goes off the air. It is accessible at 107.9 FM in Center City and 89.1 FM in Trenton. "We've always been licensed as a 24-hour station, but we couldn't afford the people," said WWFM general manager Walt Gradzki, who explained that in January, an FCC regulation that required a station, for emergency reasons, to be staffed whenever it was broadcasting was altered.
NEWS
September 9, 1997 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Classical-music lovers who live in Philadelphia's western suburbs have been phoning Walter Gradzki in New Jersey in hopes he'll send some music their way. But Gradzki, general manager of Mercer County Community College radio station WWFM-FM, which plays only classical music, has to disappoint them. "It's making me crazy," said Gradzki. "I'd love to be able to send our signal to Montgomery County. But we can't. " WWFM, he explains, is a 3,000-watt public radio station, launched at MCCC 16 years ago. Since then, it has increased its range and listening audience by putting up translators - devices that transmit its satellite signal - in 13 locations, including Center City, Atlantic City and Allentown, Pa. But WWFM can't put up a translator in an area just because some people living there would like to hear it - not if its signal would interfere with an existing one. WWFM can't interfere with any of the larger radio stations here - or any little broadcaster either.
NEWS
September 4, 1997 | By Kevin Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it comes to radio and television, you've just landed in the nation's fourth-largest media market. And that means big-time choices for your listening and viewing pleasure. Here's a summary of what's on the dials. AM radio: 560 Religious talk WFIL 610 Sports talk WIP 800 Religious talk, gospel WTMR 860 Tropical Latin WTEL 900 Hispanic urban WURD 950 Nostalgia, big band WPEN 990 Contemporary gospel WZZD 1060 All-news KYW 1210 Talk WPHT 1340 Black-oriented talk WHAT 1480 Inspirational-information WDAS 1490 Middle of the road WBCB 1540 Ethnic WNWR FM radio: 88.1 Diversified WNJT 88.5 Adult album alternative WXPN 89.1 Classical, jazz WWFM 89.7 Varied WGLS 90.1 Jazz, special WRTI 90.9 National Public Radio WHYY 91.7 Jazz, rock, special WKDU 92.5 Country music WXTU 93.3 Album-oriented rock WMMR 94.1 Rock WYSP 95.7 Classical music WFLN 96.5 Talk WWDB 98.1 Oldies WOGL 98.9 Urban contemporary WUSL 100.3 Modern rock WPLY 101.1 Adult contemporary WBEB 101.5 Contemporary and classic hits WKXW 102.1 Contemporary and dance hits WIOQ 102.9 Classic hits WMGK 103.9 Urban Contemporary WPHI 104.5 Adult contemporary hits WYXR 105.3 Urban adult contemporary WDAS 106.1 Smooth jazz WJJZ 106.9 Religious, music WKDN 107.7 Big band, talk WSNJ Local television: KYW, Channel 3 (CBS)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1996 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Metropolitan Opera will be on the radio here starting Dec. 7, but listeners will have to retrain themselves to find it. The often-sold WFLN-FM (95.7), long the source of live Met broadcasts, announced last summer that it would abandon the Saturday afternoon broadcasts because its rating were only half of that owner's goals. The station also changed its format to favor shorter classical music pieces and semiclassical fare. Although it was sold again after that announcement, the new owner, Evergreen Media, has followed the format established by former owner Secret Communications, of Cincinnati.
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