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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
The goings-on at WXPN (89.1/FM) have the makings of one of the many folk songs by such artists as Priscilla Herdman, Joan Baez, Pierre Bensusan and others the station is known for playing. There's drama, sorrow, protest, and misunderstanding, all over several proposed changes to the station's normal format. WXPN's loyal listeners consider the station a form of art that should be treasured as is - or changed only to enhance what's already there. However, WXPN's new station manager, Mark Fuerst, says he believes that if the station is considered art then it "does need to evolve.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Can a prime-time alternative rock show pull listeners away from mainstream stations to non-commercial radio? WXPN (88.9/FM) hopes to up its audience ratings with just such an offering, shifting two hours of its late-night "Beat Planet" show (perhaps with a new name) into a 9-11 p.m. slot Tuesdays through Fridays starting July 31. "It will be an attempt to do a contemporary rock show in a way that doesn't sound like college radio," WXPN music director Mike Morrison said from the University of Pennsylvania campus.
NEWS
November 16, 1992 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Major talent changes at WXPN (FM/88.5) go into effect today, clarifying the station's weekday focus as a "progressive rocker" just as new "modern rock" rival WIBF (FM/103.9) is warming up for its first live day. Longtime local radio personality Michael Tearson, recently sliced by WMMR in a cost-cutting, shift-eliminating measure, takes over the 10 p.m.-1 a.m. slot weeknights at WXPN - virtually the same hours he was working at the commercial rock station. Elise Brown, a vivacious fill-in at WXPN since summer, is being rewarded with the noon-4 p.m. slot.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Karin Begin, popular afternoon disc jockey on WXPN-FM (88.5), was suspended indefinitely with pay yesterday after she admitted exaggerating her teenage acting career, then falsifying documents to support her claim when suspicions arose. Begin, 24, a Canadian who joined the University of Pennsylvania's noncommercial, alternative music station in September, was to begin the suspension after her 4-to-7 p.m. shift yesterday. "WXPN has to maintain a standard of integrity, which Karin violated," station manager Mark Fuerst said yesterday.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Karin Begin, the WXPN-FM (88.5) afternoon disc jockey who has been on suspension for two weeks, was fired Monday by the alternative-music station. Begin, 24, was taken off the air April 28 after admitting that she falsified her resume. Yesterday, she described her dismissal meeting with station manager Mark Fuerst as "very brief, very impersonal. He talked a lot about the integrity of the station and said it was the only decision he could come to. " Fuerst, citing the privacy of personnel matters, declined to discuss the situation in detail.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1994 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bert Wylen, host of Gaydreams, the gay-issues program aired Sundays on WXPN-FM (88.5), has filed a discrimination complaint against the station with the Philadelphia Human Relations Commission. In the complaint, filed last Monday, the freelance producer, who is gay, contends the station is discriminating against him because of his sexual orientation by allowing a Maryland station that has broadcast the 'XPN signal since September to exclude Gaydreams from its programming. Rather than air the one-hour Gaydreams and the lesbian-themed Amazon Country that precedes it, WKHS-FM (90.5)
BUSINESS
October 2, 2002 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peering around the dark two-story first floor of the future home of radio station WXPN-FM (88.5), it's hard to envision funky loft-style offices and a three-tiered music stage with a restaurant and bistro tables. The place is a mess. The floor is part dirt. The steel beams are peeling concrete. The 25-foot-high ceiling has a massive hole that exposes the dilapidated second story. But a planned $15 million renovation of this former home of plumbing manufacturer Hajoca Corp. could turn 3025 Walnut St. into the next hip destination in University City.
NEWS
June 10, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
After four years, WXPN has scaled back Y-Rock on XPN , canning the alternative-music show heard Wednesday through Friday nights on 88.5 FM. Y-Rock will continue at www.yrockonxpn.org and at XPN's HD-2 side channel. Operations manager Josh T. Landow was one of six people laid off this week from the University of Pennsylvania-owned station. Station manager Roger LaMay blamed the economy. "We delayed it as long as we could, but we have an obligation to balance our budget," he said.
NEWS
March 8, 1994 | BY MUBARAK S. DAHIR
The University of Pennsylvania's radio station, WXPN, is doing a song and dance routine these days. But they're out of tune and out of step. They're tap dancing around a complaint filed with the city's Human Relations Commission against them by gay producer Bert Wylan. Wylan is contending that the station discriminates against him every Sunday when a technician at WXPN switches off a transmitter for two hours from 8 to 10 p.m. so that WKHS - a station run by the Kent County school board on the eastern shore of Maryland - does not receive WXPN's gay and lesbian programming.
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fans of WXPN-FM (88.9), the University of Pennsylvania's eclectically programmed radio station, are in for big changes come Sept. 7. Not that the 24-hour, noncommercial station, perhaps best known for its devotion to traditional folk and electronic/rock music, won't continue to be eclectic. WXPN will still offer a bountiful mix of folk, Cajun, blues, Latin, African, jazz, rock and avant-garde music. But the station will considerably reduce its classical programming; discontinue Moonshine, the early-evening folk show now broadcast Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and donate two of its popular jazz programs, Salt Peanuts and Library of Jazz, to Temple University's WRTI-FM (90.1)
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BUSINESS
April 2, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Professional rockers and rappers, folkies and bluesniks will convene this weekend in University City to trade children's tunes, entertain "the base," and debate burning issues at the KindieComm music conference, the annual blowout for kids music-making. Among them: "What's the ideal set length for today's short-attention-span listener? Maybe just 15 minutes?" What are today's most relevant issues in song? Having two mommies or daddies? The dangers of polluted water and air? How to pick your friends and your nose (best not at the same time)
NEWS
November 15, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A VOLUNTEER photographer for WXPN-FM was busted yesterday for allegedly taking sexually explicit photos of children and downloading child pornography, federal authorities said. Federal prosecutors claim Mark Wilkens, 57, a 26-year volunteer at WXPN, took the photos of kids - ages 2 to 10 - at public events hosted by the station's Kids Corner program between August 2010 and July 4. He allegedly photographed children as they were being changed out of bathing suits or otherwise exposed, unbeknownst to their parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff, Daily News Staff Writer
Local Twitter mayhem "Orange Is the New Black" and "Hemlock Grove" star  Madeline Brewer , who hails from nearby Pitman, N.J., stopped by WXPN's XPoNential outdoor music fest Sunday evening. From the audience, she took to social media to express her enthusiasm for headliner  Grace Potter . But she experienced a bit of confusion when she put a call on Twitter for "bubbles," and instead got fans thinking she wanted drugs. To clarify, she was looking for champagne.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
After years at the mike for WXPN, Michaela Majoun, the voice of morning for thousands of music-hungry people locally and worldwide, is stepping over to her other love: writing. She came to what was then a pretty good college station in 1989, the first professional on-air host the station had ever hired. Since then, and largely thanks to her efforts, XPN has become a cultural hub, connecting fans to artists they might not have known about, organizing concerts, conventions, and events such as the XPoNential Music Festival, with an especially splendid lineup Wednesday through Friday.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Between affixing wristbands to WXPN members at the July 2007 XPoNential Music Festival, Wendy and Geoff kept noticing each other. Once the day's volunteer duties were done, Wendy joined her girlfriends. But two hours later came a tap on her shoulder. "Would you like to join me on my blanket?" Geoff asked. Her friends understood her decision to leave them. A few hours of listening and dancing later, Geoff put his arm around Wendy. It made her extremely curious.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
You may know Philadelphia public radio station WXPN-FM as the sponsor of the annual star-studded XPoNential Music Festival. This year's XPoNential had a bit of a Southern kick, thanks to an appearance by CJ Chenier and the Red Hot Louisiana Band. Chenier is one of the founding saints of contemporary zydeco, and his performance - complete with accordion riffs - was for more than concertgoers' entertainment. Another reason Chenier was at the festival was to generate buzz about WXPN's latest endeavor, the ambitious, 15-month-long Zydeco Crossroads project.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2014 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
The XPoNential Festival, now in its 21st year, revels in breadth and diversity. Ranging from Triple-A mainstays to zydeco torch-bearers, from child fiddlers to septuagenarian blues icons, from sensitive singer-songwriters to rowdy rock-and-rollers, it's a place for discoveries. The festival, sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania's WXPN, features more than 30 acts from Friday through Sunday on Camden's waterfront at Wiggins Park and the adjacent Susquehanna Bank Center. "Every year I think the common experience at the festival is people go and they're really excited about seeing this band or that band, and they always come away talking about some band that they hadn't ever seen before," says Roger LaMay, WXPN's general manager.
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writer
AUSTIN, Texas - Two people were killed and 23 hospitalized early Thursday after a car crashed through temporary barricades into a crowd of pedestrians at the South by Southwest Music festival. The mood was dark at the Austin Convention Center, headquarters of the festival, later Thursday. SXSW managing director Roland Swenson issued a statement saying "the SXSW staff is stunned and deeply moved by the events of last night. " He said the festival planned "to carry on with our scheduled daytime events" and added, "We are contacting all of the venues to find out if they have made any decisions about our operations that impact our visitors.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Fittingly, WXPN's yearlong Mississippi Blues Project - an online interactive program with accompanying live shows - ends with a dance party Friday night at Theatre of Living Arts. In the hands of Jonny Meister, host of XPN's The Blues Show , and his longtime associate David Dye ( World Cafe creator and DJ for WXPN's "Funky Friday Dance Party"), that finale will celebrate all shades of blues. James Cotton is on board for Friday's live Funky Blues Finale and Dance Party at TLA. Throughout his career, the harmonica player, now 78, has played key roles in some of the blues' greatest recordings.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Three years ago, WXPN faced a crossroads for its annual summer music festival. The University of Pennsylvania's noncommercial radio station confronted an increasingly competitive market: The summer concert circuit was getting more crowded, and, given changes in the music industry, bands were relying more and more on tours for revenues so their fees were going up. The festival had grown since 1994, when it began with nine artists at the Singer Songwriter...
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