CollectionsWynnewood
IN THE NEWS

Wynnewood

NEWS
August 17, 1994 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Marshall A. Portnoy has been named cantor for Main Line Reform Temple Beth Elohim in Wynnewood. Portnoy, of Bala Cynwyd, is a native of New Haven, Conn. He is a graduate of Yale University and was ordained at the Jewish Theological Seminary. He earned a master's degree in musicology at the University of Louisville. Portnoy was cantor for Congregation Adath Jeshurun in Louisville, Ky., for 23 years. He is a member of the American Conference of Cantors and the Cantors' Assembly.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg and Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
Wynnewood resident Rosemary Luardo has been named a Gallatin Scholar by the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at New York University, where she is completing her freshman year. She is a 1994 graduate of the Woodlyne School in Strafford. Gallatin Scholars are selected based on academics and a faculty interview. Those selected participate in educational, social and cultural activities, including an international study trip and the freshman honors seminar. This year, Luardo and the other 16 scholars traveled to Greece to enhance their studies in Greek tragedy, myths, and works of art. The scholars also attend the theater and visit museums in New York and other American cities.
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James F. Burke Sr., 88, a retired family physician, died of heart failure Tuesday at his home in Wynnewood. Dr. Burke practiced family medicine for more than 50 years in Havertown, Kirklyn and Wynnewood. He retired in 1986. He was born and raised in Philadelphia and graduated from West Catholic High School in 1928, from Villanova University in 1932, and from Thomas Jefferson University Hospital School of Medicine in 1936. After completing his internship at Misericordia Hospital in Philadelphia, he entered private practice at his home in Havertown.
NEWS
April 15, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Arthur Odabashian, 73, of Wynnewood, a pediatrician who treated patients from many ethnic backgrounds in his office in Yeadon, Delaware County, for more than 30 years, died of heart failure on Wednesday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Fluent in five languages, Dr. Odabashian had patients whose nationalities included Armenian, Russian, Iranian and African American. His son, Stephen, said that whatever their heritage, children and parents loved "Dr. O. " "The house was constantly flooded with cards, flowers, cookies, and drawings from his patients and their parents," his son said.
NEWS
October 24, 1986 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
A Wynnewood-based crime-watch association, which developed the National Night Out project, has been selected by a blue-ribbon panel to receive one of this year's National Crime Prevention Awards. The National Association of Town Watch Inc., an umbrella organization of about 1,200 crime-watch groups in 36 states, was singled out by the Crime Prevention Coalition in Washington, according to Jean O'Neil of the coalition. "They just have a very long history of encouraging and supporting town watch and neighborhood watch-type groups, which is an extraordinarily successful way of getting citizens to work together on crime programs," said O'Neil, a spokeswoman for the organization that annually recognizes outstanding crime-prevention efforts across the country.
NEWS
October 7, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Author Chaim Potok and Pulitzer Prize-winning illustrator Tony Auth will appear at the Zany Brainy store in Wynnewood for a book signing of their new collaboration, The Tree of Here, from 2:30 to 4 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free. The Tree of Here is Potok's first children's book. It tells a story of leaving a comfortable place and starting over in a new one, stressing the importance of a strong family. Potok has written many novels, including The Chosen and My Name is Asher Lev. Auth, a political cartoonist for The Inquirer, has written and illustrated many children's books.
NEWS
May 30, 1998 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The spacious house on a secluded side street in Wynnewood has already been sold and the remaining contents that Wilson's Auctioneers and Appraisers will liquidate beginning at 10 a.m. today are for the most part undistinguished. But together they stand as quiet witnesses to a family life that must have been enviable for its stability. The house at 645 Sussex Rd. belonged to Marie L. Penrose, who died in January at age 97. "We lived here since 1941," her son, Robert L. Penrose, said.
NEWS
January 7, 1988 | By Ruth Tallmadge, Special to The Inquirer
The New Money Workbook for Women is a revised, 1988 edition of an advice book by a local author, Carole Phillips. Intended as a step-by-step guide, The New Money Workbook includes the basics of what the author calls "the seven categories of personal financial decisions - saving, borrowing, insurance, investing, retirement planning, estate planning and tax planning. " The 146-page paperback costs $9.95 and is published by Brick House Publishing Co., Andover, Mass. Phillips is a financial planner from Wynnewood who is associated with the nonprofit Women's Financial Center in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Susan Cramer and Susan Lodish, both of Wynnewood, and Max Cohen of Philadelphia are recipients of the annual Ruth N. Maltzman Memorial award for their contributions to Temple Beth Hillel-Beth El in Wynnewood. Each will receive a plaque in recognition of years of service to the congregation and to Jewish education. The ceremony will take place during intermission at the Sunday evening performance of the musical Rags at St. Joseph University's Bluett Theater, 5600 City Ave., Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1993 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Stacey Lassally recently took time out from the drudgery of her day job - a job that consists of wheeling and dealing with Julia Roberts, Tom Hanks, Jonathan Demme, Kenneth Branagh and other ho-hum entities - to drop in on her Wynnewood alma mater, Friends' Central School. The occasion was the Class of 1978's 15-year reunion, and since Lassally happened to be in the neighborhood (she was in Baltimore the night before, for a test screening of Philadelphia), the president of production at TriStar Pictures jumped at the chance to visit her old stamping ground.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|