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Wynton Marsalis

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1994 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He surfaced as an upstart in the early '80s, scarcely out of his teens. His rapid rise to fame in jazz circles and elsewhere had much to do with sparking the "young lions" movement that saw so many youthful musicians grasping the traditional elements of jazz and gaining wide acceptance in a field long dominated by the older guys. Since that flashy debut, Wynton Marsalis has won high praise for his recordings in both jazz and classical categories. And there is no evidence that the gifted New Orleans-rooted trumpeter/composer is about to slow down.
NEWS
March 17, 1987 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
For decades, the cornet was the voice of America. Not as self-important and brilliant as the trumpet, the cornet sounded home-town America's sentimental melodies for listeners who lay on the grass around the bandstand. It was an instrument that could play the hero, too, in a way, but it expressed something fundamental about a nation that had not yet lost innocence. That innocent age has to be remembered now, and the Eastman Wind Ensemble's concert last night at the Academy of Music was a reminder full of nostalgia as well as some contemporary astonishments.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter announced Monday that Wynton Marsalis, the jazz and classical musician, composer, and arts advocate, is the recipient of the 2015 Marian Anderson Award. Marsalis, winner of a Grammy Award and a Pulitzer Prize, and honored with the National Medal of Arts, joins other recipients of the medal, including Sidney Poitier, Maya Angelou, Mia Farrow, James Earl Jones, Berry Gordy Jr., and 2014 winner Jon Bon Jovi. He will accept the award at a gala concert Nov. 10 at the Kimmel Center.
NEWS
April 27, 2004 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
As severe, serious and dogmatic as Wynton Marsalis sometimes seems, as a musician and performing personality he is really quite droll. His stream-of-consciousness tribute to Thelonious Monk following Monk's "Oscar T" was loopy and hysterical, and a relaxed Marsalis came off as a man who plays music because he draws an immense amount of joy from the experience. Marsalis has been assailed for staying within a certain stylistic framework as a composer and player, but he can't be faulted on his musicianship.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1994 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Trumpeter-bandleader Wynton Marsalis may be disbanding his septet, but hold the obituaries, please. This finale is more like his rebirth. Concertgoers at Rowan College witnessed the septet's second-to-last concert on Wednesday night, and it was a rocking time that moved effortlessly from stride piano to New Orleans funeral dirge, from boogie-woogie to blues. After Marsalis, 33, ends the group at a Lincoln Center concert next Saturday, he plans to write and perform big-band and orchestral works.
NEWS
June 22, 1991 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
In pop music, youth is a market. In jazz, it's becoming the product. It began about 10 years ago with the success of trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, then in his teens. Since that time, record companies - blissfully forgetting that musicians as talented as Marsalis are rare at any age - have been signing impeccably tailored but musically untested young hard-boppers in the hope that lightning will strike again. On Thursday at the Academy of Music, the Mellon PSFS Jazz Festival paired Marsalis' septet with a constellation of these new stars - trumpeters Roy Hargrove and Marlon Jordan, saxophonists Tim Warfield and Antonio Hart, pianist Benny Green, guitarist Mark Whitfield, bassist Christian McBride and drummer Carl Allen - who performed together as Jazz Futures.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1989 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last night Wynton Marsalis played the blues. It wasn't your down-home, garden variety. Marsalis, a jazzman who went to the Juilliard School of Music, brought to bear his massive classical chops on an eclectic set of material that ranged from Strayhorn to Schoenberg. It was at times a little maddening. Marsalis would bend and splatter notes, softening his playing by dipping back from the microphone. His sextet occasionally put out sheets of sound that seemed to wash over several hundred fans at the Theater of Living Arts, where Marsalis is to end his two-day stand tonight.
NEWS
May 28, 1995 | By Sonya Senkowsky, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Justin Pierce, eighth-grade drummer, had prepared himself for last week's visit by trumpeter Wynton Marsalis. Like the rest of the Paulsboro High School band, Justin knew he would be sharing center stage with his idol, backing the legendary jazz and classical musician during a special concert performed on school time. But there was no way Justin could count on what would happen afterward. "Come here, I want to show you something," said Marsalis, taking Justin's seat at the school drum set before an emptying auditorium.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Kimmel Center's fifth nonclassical season serves up a mixed bag of tried-and-true world music, pop, and jazz, along with a handful of intriguing programming selections. The season starts with Tony Bennett (Sept. 15), then gets its two pop-music highlights out of the way early, with Philadelphia-born soul man Solomon Burke (Sept. 17), and the great East L.A. Chicano rock band Los Lobos, with sterling Texas singer-songwriter Alejandro Escovedo opening (Oct. 2). Other than a Mavis Staples-Taj Mahal soul-and-blues bill (March 11)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Near the end of his first set Wednesday at the Zellerbach Theatre, after his sextet had restated the melody of Thelonious Monk's "Four in One" and was ready to send it home, Wynton Marsalis stepped up to the microphone looking like he had some unfinished business. The acclaimed trumpeter, who had charmed the capacity crowd with self-deprecating wit and nuggets of jazz wisdom, sounded suddenly aggressive. Where he had previously tried to capture the capricious spirit of Monk, he was now in a technician's overdrive, cleanly fingering a chorus of perfectly manicured double-time bebop, barely even stopping to breathe.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR DoTHIS
Philadelphia pianist Orrin Evans isn't just a brilliant player and composer, but a savvy curator as well. That's why, for the finale of Evans' live jazz series at South, he's welcoming one of post-bop's most poignant, pliable, even poetic drummers and composers, Jeff "Tain" Watts. Watts was given that nickname by late master pianist Kenny Kirkland ("Kenny taught me to trust my ears and instincts, and I miss him dearly") when the pair played with trumpeter Wynton Marsalis and his saxophonist brother, Branford, for the better part of the 1980s.
NEWS
November 12, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Kimmel Center was aglow for the Marian Anderson awards on Tuesday evening with stars including honoree Wynton Marsalis, TV journalist Soledad O'Brien as master of ceremonies, gospel singer Kim Burrell, and Grammy-winning vocalist Lalah Hathaway. Attendees donned regal dresses and dapper suits to honor historic contralto Anderson and jazz legend Marsalis. Philadelphia-born Marian Anderson established an award in her name in 1943, originally intended to help promising young singers.
NEWS
November 12, 2015
The Marian Anderson Awards program is a glitzy affair that each year honors A-list celebrities while raising money for young artists. Each year as the prize money is handed over - this year to jazz trumpeter Wynton Marsalis - the question inevitably pops up: Why do the Marian Anderson Awards not fund the struggling house museum in South Philadelphia where the famed contralto once lived ? I mean, why not? Both the awards and the Marian Anderson Historical Residence Museum were created to keep the legacy of the famed contralto alive.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
The weather will most likely be autumnal, the beaches nearly empty, and the stores on winter hours, but the Exit 0 International Jazz Festival is a good reason to make an off-season trek to Cape May this weekend. This year's fall edition of the twice-yearly festival will be headlined by one of jazz's most venerated ensembles, the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra led by Wynton Marsalis. "It's incredibly exciting to be able to present that level of artist in the fourth year of the festival," says Michael Kline, Exit 0's founder and producer.
NEWS
September 13, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trump buys Miss Universe Potential GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump has bought out NBC's half of the company that produces Miss USA and Miss Universe . The move follows NBC's July decision to drop its Miss Universe telecast because of outrage over Trump's comments about Mexican immigrants. Several companies, including Univision, severed ties with Trump after he said immigrants are "bringing crime. They're rapists. " He added, "Some, I assume, are good people.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter announced Monday that Wynton Marsalis, the jazz and classical musician, composer, and arts advocate, is the recipient of the 2015 Marian Anderson Award. Marsalis, winner of a Grammy Award and a Pulitzer Prize, and honored with the National Medal of Arts, joins other recipients of the medal, including Sidney Poitier, Maya Angelou, Mia Farrow, James Earl Jones, Berry Gordy Jr., and 2014 winner Jon Bon Jovi. He will accept the award at a gala concert Nov. 10 at the Kimmel Center.
NEWS
January 3, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
CHICAGO has a branded, hometown-oriented jazz orchestra. Cleveland and Pittsburgh, too. So why doesn't our town - far richer than most in jazz history, heroes and students - have a rootin', tootin' Philadelphia-labeled ensemble to celebrate our riches, from the hey-days of Coltrane, Gillespie and Getz to the newest kids on the blocks? Come Tuesday, at long last, we will, as the 17-member, brass-heavy Jazz Orchestra of Philadelphia (JOP) makes its debut in gala (and hopefully fundraising)
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Welcoming the audience to Verizon Hall on Saturday night, Wynton Marsalis promised, "We're going to have a good time swinging up in here tonight. " That's largely been the mission of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra for the last 25 years, and the 15-piece big band didn't deviate from that plan while celebrating its silver anniversary. When the orchestra began in 1988, Marsalis had emerged as the leader of the "young lions," a group of neoconservative young musicians determined to refocus jazz toward a time before the avant-garde experiments of the '60s and the fusion of the '70s steered the music away from its swing and blues-oriented roots.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Trombonist Angel "Papo" Vazquez has long credited music for rescuing him from the streets of North Philadelphia, where he grew up. The neighborhood around his home near Eighth Street and Indiana Avenue was divided by gang rivalries, which he strove to avoid. "Philadelphia was pretty segregated back then," Vazquez recalls. "I remember having to run from my house to my high school and back again before I got run out of the neighborhood. " But that uneasy intermingling of African American and Latino also contributed to Vazquez' love of jazz and of traditional Puerto Rican music.
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