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NEWS
January 10, 1988 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
DX Imaging, a joint venture of Du Pont Co. and Xerox Corp., will be opening for business in Uwchlan soon. Just how soon isn't clear. DX, which was formed last April to develop color printing and copying machines, was to begin operations Jan. 1 at the Lionville Corporate Center on Gordon Drive. So far, the company's doors remain closed and it isn't listed by telephone directory assistance, but workers are busy renovating its 162,000- square-foot headquarters. It may open officially in February.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1991 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
After investing more than three years and tens of millions of dollars, two corporate giants yesterday said they would scrap their fruitless joint venture, laying off about 130 employees at DX Imaging Inc. in Lionville. Du Pont Co. and Xerox Corp. launched DX Imaging in October 1987 to develop and market technology enabling printing companies to more effectively reproduce color materials. The partners said the decision to dissolve the venture was mutual. A Du Pont spokesman cited cost overruns, technical barriers and higher-than- expected costs that would make commercialization of products "impossible.
NEWS
February 16, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Blackshear, 77, of Wynnefield, a pioneering career woman in computer technology who rose to be a vice president of Xerox Corp., died of cancer Saturday, Feb. 9, at her home. Mrs. Blackshear began working with computers in the late 1950s at the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co. She later spent more than 20 years with Xerox, where she became vice president for strategic planning. She retired in 2002. She got her start in the emerging computer field in the late 1950s, when, while working in the actuarial department of Penn Mutual, she learned data processing on the job, said her husband, David Goodchild.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1987 | By Neill Borowski and Gary Cohn, Inquirer Staff Writers
Two manufacturing giants, Du Pont Co. and Xerox Corp., are thinking small by forming a joint venture to develop new products in the Philadelphia area. More than 200 people will be employed by the end of this year at DX Imaging, which Du Pont and Xerox expect to develop color-printing and copying machines at a site to be selected in Philadelphia's western suburbs. Both companies had been working on the printing technology for different purposes and decided to share the development costs rather than work separately, L. Lyndon Haddon, a Xerox vice president and head of its Business Products and Systems Group's strategic business office, said last week.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2010 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
    Ursula M. Burns could be considered the unexpected face of technology in America.    She is the chairman and chief executive of a company that once was a verb meaning "to copy," like Google today means "to search. "    When was the last time you heard anyone say they'd Xeroxed something?    Oh, Xerox is still around, selling and leasing copy machines. But with the rise of the developing world and the Internet revolution, Xerox is now a very different company, with nearly half of its $22 billion annual revenue coming from technology services, such as data-center outsourcing and electronic benefits-transfer programs.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1987 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
Breakthrough Marketing Inc., a King of Prussia firm that was once hailed as one of nation's biggest and most successful photocopying firms, was ordered yesterday to pay more than $1.4 million in unpaid debts and other costs to the Xerox Corp. The $1.446 million judgment was handed down by U.S. District Court Judge Joseph S. Lord 3d. The suit by Xerox represents the largest legal action yet against Breakthrough Marketing, which, since abandoning its former headquarters in Wayne in May has become the target of numerous suits and was the object of a Postal Service investigation.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Xerox is hiring 500 customer-care specialists in Cherry Hill for temporary positions that may become permanent, the company announced Wednesday. The hires - which will add to the 850 Xerox employees currently stationed in the township - will be made over the summer. While the jobs are six-month project-based positions, they may become permanent, "most likely" in Cherry Hill, said Alexander Charles, a Xerox spokesman. The company, which has headquarters in Norwalk, Conn., and has a Cherry Hill facility on Woodcrest Road, is hiring "due to a client's changing business needs," Charles said.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a man who built his career as a top-notch salesman and dealmaker, Bill McDermott, 53, chief executive of SAP, one of the world's largest business software companies, has mastered the techniques: Use the person's name, repeat their phrases, say "and," not "but. " And obviously, be a pro at the kind of small talk that connects customer and company. But in October, he topped it all with the release of an autobiography, Winners Dream: A Journey from Corner Store to Corner Office . The book, written in first-person, describes his blue-collar upbringing in Amityville, N.Y.; his business start as a deli owner at age 17; and his ability to inspire disheartened divisions of major companies, from Xerox to SAP, even as he coped with his mother's death and his wife's struggle with breast cancer.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
WHEN BILL Johnson moved into a Dallas apartment complex in October 2012, a neighbor named James rolled out the welcome wagon. Sort of. "Oh, great, another old queen moving in," James said as Johnson and his friends unloaded his belongings at Crescent View Apartments in the Texas city's Oak Lawn section. Johnson, 54, an unemployed financial adviser, figured that James was just being nice, one gay man to another in the "gayborhood. " "I think he was trying to be friendly and joking," Johnson said.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Transit agencies around the country will be watching SEPTA June 13. That's the debut, announced Friday, of the long-promised smart-fare card, SEPTA Key. It is among the most complicated systems of its kind, designed to manage fares for trains, buses, and trolleys with an open payment system, which will eventually accept not just the branded SEPTA card but certain bank cards. "Everyone is watching Philadelphia," said Walter Allen, who runs Acumen Building Enterprise, an Oakland, Calif., company that installs similar systems.
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NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Transit agencies around the country will be watching SEPTA June 13. That's the debut, announced Friday, of the long-promised smart-fare card, SEPTA Key. It is among the most complicated systems of its kind, designed to manage fares for trains, buses, and trolleys with an open payment system, which will eventually accept not just the branded SEPTA card but certain bank cards. "Everyone is watching Philadelphia," said Walter Allen, who runs Acumen Building Enterprise, an Oakland, Calif., company that installs similar systems.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey lawmakers on Monday scrutinized the state's handling of thousands of low-income residents' Medicaid applications, as the Christie administration asserted it had made progress in reducing the backlog. Gov. Christie expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, and 400,000 residents have gained health insurance through the government program since 2014. However, thousands of applications have languished at understaffed county welfare agencies, in part because of the state's antiquated computer systems.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a man who built his career as a top-notch salesman and dealmaker, Bill McDermott, 53, chief executive of SAP, one of the world's largest business software companies, has mastered the techniques: Use the person's name, repeat their phrases, say "and," not "but. " And obviously, be a pro at the kind of small talk that connects customer and company. But in October, he topped it all with the release of an autobiography, Winners Dream: A Journey from Corner Store to Corner Office . The book, written in first-person, describes his blue-collar upbringing in Amityville, N.Y.; his business start as a deli owner at age 17; and his ability to inspire disheartened divisions of major companies, from Xerox to SAP, even as he coped with his mother's death and his wife's struggle with breast cancer.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
WHEN BILL Johnson moved into a Dallas apartment complex in October 2012, a neighbor named James rolled out the welcome wagon. Sort of. "Oh, great, another old queen moving in," James said as Johnson and his friends unloaded his belongings at Crescent View Apartments in the Texas city's Oak Lawn section. Johnson, 54, an unemployed financial adviser, figured that James was just being nice, one gay man to another in the "gayborhood. " "I think he was trying to be friendly and joking," Johnson said.
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The electronic system retailers use to process food stamps shut down Saturday, affecting shoppers in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and 15 other states. Officials at Xerox, which runs the Electronic Benefits Transfer system, said it crashed during a routine test Saturday morning. The system lets retailers process Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and Women, Infants and Children benefits from customers. The shutdown potentially affected hundreds of thousands of families across the region who buy food with EBT cards.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Xerox is hiring 500 customer-care specialists in Cherry Hill for temporary positions that may become permanent, the company announced Wednesday. The hires - which will add to the 850 Xerox employees currently stationed in the township - will be made over the summer. While the jobs are six-month project-based positions, they may become permanent, "most likely" in Cherry Hill, said Alexander Charles, a Xerox spokesman. The company, which has headquarters in Norwalk, Conn., and has a Cherry Hill facility on Woodcrest Road, is hiring "due to a client's changing business needs," Charles said.
NEWS
February 16, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Blackshear, 77, of Wynnefield, a pioneering career woman in computer technology who rose to be a vice president of Xerox Corp., died of cancer Saturday, Feb. 9, at her home. Mrs. Blackshear began working with computers in the late 1950s at the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co. She later spent more than 20 years with Xerox, where she became vice president for strategic planning. She retired in 2002. She got her start in the emerging computer field in the late 1950s, when, while working in the actuarial department of Penn Mutual, she learned data processing on the job, said her husband, David Goodchild.
NEWS
December 24, 2011
Jacob E. Goldman, 90, a physicist who as Xerox's chief scientist founded its vaunted Palo Alto Research Center, which invented the modern personal computer, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday in Westport, Conn. Emblematic of a time when American corporations invested heavily in basic scientific research, Mr. Goldman played an important role both at Ford Motor Co., during the 1950s and at Xerox, in the 1960s and 1970s, in financing basic scientific research to try to spark corporate innovation.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2010 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
    Ursula M. Burns could be considered the unexpected face of technology in America.    She is the chairman and chief executive of a company that once was a verb meaning "to copy," like Google today means "to search. "    When was the last time you heard anyone say they'd Xeroxed something?    Oh, Xerox is still around, selling and leasing copy machines. But with the rise of the developing world and the Internet revolution, Xerox is now a very different company, with nearly half of its $22 billion annual revenue coming from technology services, such as data-center outsourcing and electronic benefits-transfer programs.
NEWS
September 29, 2009 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leo B. Kelly, 66, of Roslyn, as accomplished an athlete as he was a salesman, died Thursday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). The longtime sales executive for Xerox Corp. first came to public attention in his native Ireland, where his gifts as a soccer goalie - playing varsity at age 13 - earned him the nickname "Wexford Wonder Boy. " His hurling team also won an all-Ireland championship in 1962. After immigrating to San Francisco in 1965 and then relocating to New York in 1967, he played semiprofessional soccer, and was center for the Monaghan Football Club that won the 1968 and 1969 Gaelic-American championships.
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