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NEWS
August 11, 2011
Harry H. Wellington, 84, whose half-century of studying and teaching law included a decade as dean of Yale Law School and eight years as dean of New York Law School, died Monday of a brain tumor at his home in New York. Mr. Wellington made an early mark in labor law, enlivening what could be a drab and technical field with vivid ideas that drew on other disciplines and tested first principles. In his 1972 book, The Unions and the Cities, he argued that it could be dangerous to allow public labor unions to become too powerful.
NEWS
June 5, 1993 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The stark hopelessness in the Oval Office seemed light-years from the sunny April day when a jovial Bill Clinton summoned reporters to the Justice Department courtyard and introduced his old schoolmate from Yale Law School. "She once sued me," Clinton crowed that morning, joking about a voting rights lawsuit Lani Guinier filed when he was governor of Arkansas and she was working for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. "Shows how broad-minded I am. " But Clinton was not in a broad-minded mood on Thursday night.
NEWS
July 6, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University early Tuesday morning elevated law school dean JoAnne A. Epps to provost, its number-two position, replacing Hai-Lung Dai, who was removed from the post last week. The appointment, subject to approval by the board of trustees, would be permanent - not interim, as universities often do so they can launch a national search. Epps, 65, who has spent 31 years at the law school, the last eight as its dean, was appointed by president Neil D. Theobald. Her title will include senior vice president and chief academic officer also, and she will oversee academics across the university's 17 schools and colleges and 12 administrative offices.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2016 | Mike Zebe, Staff
The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia has appointed Phoebe A. Haddon, chancellor of Rutgers University-Camden, as a Class C director of its board. for a three-year term. Haddon became chancellor of Rutgers University–Camden in 2014. Previously, she had been dean of the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. Before that, she had been a faculty member at Temple University's Beasley School of Law for nearly 30-years. She is a member of the American Bar Association's Commission on the Future of Legal Services, the CEO Council for Growth, the board of the Chamber of Commerce Southern New Jersey, and the board of trustees for the Cooper University Health System.
NEWS
March 4, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania State Treasurer Rob McCord yesterday recalled sitting at his Bryn Mawr pool and being amazed at Jonathan Schmidt. It was the summer of 2006, and McCord, then a businessman, was the mentor for Mr. Schmidt, who held a Pennsylvania Political Leaders Fellowship from the Center for Progressive Leadership. "He had a formidable mind," McCord said of the Yale Law School graduate. "I asked him to tell me the history of Social Security, the ways [to] future solvency.
NEWS
May 28, 1987 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Circuit Judge A. Leon Higgenbotham Jr. had some simple advice last week for 422 graduates of Beaver College. Keep your eyes open, he said. "For many Americans, as they dwell in suburbia or in comfortable homes in the city, as they pursue their careers in air-conditioned offices, they seem to become blind to the misery so many others exist" in, the judge said. "My request to you is that you never allow yourself to become blind to the injustices around you, that you never become callous" to the suffering of others, Higgenbotham said.
NEWS
July 21, 1996 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Garrett S. Hoag, 95, a founding partner of a law firm with offices in Boston and Washington, died Thursday of heart failure at Crosslands retirement community in Kennett Square. Mr. Hoag, a Haverford native who spent much of his professional life in the Boston area, helped start the law firm Foley, Hoag & Eliot in 1943. He first worked with Henry Foley and later with Thomas Eliot, a former Massachusetts congressman. Mr. Hoag was an active member of the Society of Friends, and his firm was a pioneer in assembling a staff of lawyers without regard to race or sex. During the Truman administration, Mr. Hoag was asked to serve on the Federal Loyalty Review Board when congressional committees were aggressively pursuing people in government and elsewhere suspected of having been sympathetic to left-wing causes.
NEWS
January 17, 1992
The most recent occupational specialty of former City Solicitor Handsel Minyard is almost too perfect as preparation for his recent appointment to the board of the Philadelphia Intergovernmental Cooperation Authority. His real estate advisory firm has been seeking to turn the non-performing assets of insolvent S&Ls into performing assets. How different can that be from figuring ways to turn a non-performing insolvent city government into one that's performing and solvent? That is, after all, one way of describing PICA's mission.
NEWS
August 21, 1989 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gilbert Edward Hardy, 38, a Washington lawyer who loved athletics, including scuba diving, died Aug. 2 in a diving accident off the coast of Morocco. Mr. Hardy was born in West Philadelphia and graduated from Our Mother of Sorrows Catholic School and St. Joseph's Preparatory School. He then attended the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Mass. Mr. Hardy was always athletic, according to his brother, Melvin. He ran track in high school, held a black belt in karate, enjoyed diving and was an avid snow skier, becoming a member of the National Black Skiers Association.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
David T. Horn Jr., 77, of Laverock, a teacher and debate coach at Bishop McDevitt High School who pointed the way to higher education for many working-class families, died Saturday, Oct. 3, of congestive heart failure at Mercy Philadelphia Hospital. Mr. Horn taught English, history, and the humanities to three generations of pupils at the Wyncote-based school. He retired last year after 53 years in the classroom. For 27 years, beginning in the 1960s, he coached McDevitt's nationally ranked debate team.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 6, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University early Tuesday morning elevated law school dean JoAnne A. Epps to provost, its number-two position, replacing Hai-Lung Dai, who was removed from the post last week. The appointment, subject to approval by the board of trustees, would be permanent - not interim, as universities often do so they can launch a national search. Epps, 65, who has spent 31 years at the law school, the last eight as its dean, was appointed by president Neil D. Theobald. Her title will include senior vice president and chief academic officer also, and she will oversee academics across the university's 17 schools and colleges and 12 administrative offices.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2016 | Mike Zebe, Staff
The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia has appointed Phoebe A. Haddon, chancellor of Rutgers University-Camden, as a Class C director of its board. for a three-year term. Haddon became chancellor of Rutgers University–Camden in 2014. Previously, she had been dean of the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. Before that, she had been a faculty member at Temple University's Beasley School of Law for nearly 30-years. She is a member of the American Bar Association's Commission on the Future of Legal Services, the CEO Council for Growth, the board of the Chamber of Commerce Southern New Jersey, and the board of trustees for the Cooper University Health System.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
David T. Horn Jr., 77, of Laverock, a teacher and debate coach at Bishop McDevitt High School who pointed the way to higher education for many working-class families, died Saturday, Oct. 3, of congestive heart failure at Mercy Philadelphia Hospital. Mr. Horn taught English, history, and the humanities to three generations of pupils at the Wyncote-based school. He retired last year after 53 years in the classroom. For 27 years, beginning in the 1960s, he coached McDevitt's nationally ranked debate team.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN & MENSAH M. DEAN, rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
OK, SO THE PRIMARY election is looming and you don't know who is running for City Council. Don't worry. The Daily News has you covered. Here's a handy thumbnail of the army of Democratic and Republican candidates who are vying to fill just seven at-large Council seats. Voters from across the city can vote for at-large candidates. But, since this is a primary election, registered Democrats may only vote for Democrats. Republican voters, likewise. Each may vote for five candidates.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
In just eight months, he's become one of Drexel University's most popular staffers. If he's not meeting with students in his West Philadelphia office, he's making the rounds of university events: Study Palooza in Center City, a meet-and-greet at the law school, boot camp in the Recreation Center, where he also has his office. "He loves his job," said Kathryn Formica, the university's coordinator of student fitness and wellness, of her office mate. "I think he's going for tenure. " This new employee is a dog, a Carolina blend with some shiba inu and corgi mixed in. His name is Jersey, and as his office nameplate attests, he is a certified therapy dog. Jersey is one of the first on-site, year-round canine therapists at a U.S. college or university, Drexel says.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University announced a new chancellor Wednesday for its Camden campus: a former professor at Temple University's law school who is now the law school dean at the University of Maryland. Phoebe A. Haddon, 63, will join Rutgers-Camden on July 1, returning to a region where she worked for decades and the state where she grew up. "It seems like a great place for me to come to after five years of being a dean here. It has a real nice-size campus for the kind of work that I'd like to do," Haddon said Wednesday afternoon.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carter R. Buller, 80, of Center City, a lawyer, civic leader, and chair of the Philadelphia law firm Montgomery, McCracken, Walker & Rhoads L.L.P., died Wednesday, Jan. 8, of kidney failure at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Starting in 1962, Mr. Buller practiced at Montgomery McCracken for his entire career. "He was going until the end," said his son, Pierce. "His last title was 'of senior counsel.' " As a partner in the firm, Mr. Buller served in many management capacities.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Lincoln Strong of Bryn Mawr, a commercial real estate lawyer who was active in urban renewal in Philadelphia, died of pneumonia at Bryn Mawr Hospital on Sunday, Oct. 14, five days before his 82d birthday. Mr. Strong was born in London to a British father and American mother who divorced when he was very young. In 1941, after their house had been bombed in the Blitzkrieg, he and his mother sailed for America on the last passenger ship to leave Ireland before the United States entered World War II. Mr. Strong became a U.S. citizen in 1946.
NEWS
October 1, 2012
By Seymour I. "Spence" Toll On Friday at the U.S. Courthouse at Sixth and Market there was a memorial service for U.S. District Judge Louis H. Pollak, who died in Philadelphia on May 8 at the age of 89. A 1978 judicial appointee of President Jimmy Carter, he became one of the nation's genuinely distinguished jurists. Like his judicial service, Judge Pollak's qualification for the judiciary was exceptional. After graduating at the top of his 1948 Yale Law School class, in 1948-49 he clerked for Supreme Court Justice Wiley B. Rutledge, then joined a major New York law firm.
NEWS
August 11, 2011
Harry H. Wellington, 84, whose half-century of studying and teaching law included a decade as dean of Yale Law School and eight years as dean of New York Law School, died Monday of a brain tumor at his home in New York. Mr. Wellington made an early mark in labor law, enlivening what could be a drab and technical field with vivid ideas that drew on other disciplines and tested first principles. In his 1972 book, The Unions and the Cities, he argued that it could be dangerous to allow public labor unions to become too powerful.
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