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Yannick N Zet S Guin

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NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Of the Philadelphia Orchestra's eight music directors in 112 years, none has arrived with the vessel-of-hope urgency that accompanies Yannick Nézet-Séguin. Bankruptcy and several years of organizational chaos have cast doubt on the orchestra as a going concern, and its public image has taken a beating. "Beautiful but beleaguered," wrote the New Yorker in advance of the orchestra's Carnegie Hall concert this week. "Can These Philadelphians Be Fabulous Again?" asked the Wall Street Journal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2011 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
If you're an orchestra in bankruptcy, programming a series of requiems for the dead might not telegraph the most reassuring message. Yet Yannick Nézet-Séguin has hit on something in this repertoire thread leading up to his official start in 10 months as the Philadelphia Orchestra's music director. Requiems are event pieces, drawing big crowds and rivers of emotion. Last season the young conductor led the Mozart/Süssmayr Requiem . He's in town now for Brahms' Ein deutsches Requiem , a canny choice given current circumstances.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. - "It's a small world, and it all comes together in Saratoga. " So said a faintly bemused Yannick Nézet-Séguin last week. Only while discussing his Saratoga concert lineup did the Philadelphia Orchestra's music director-designate realize he'd brought together talent from the current coordinate points of his career - London, Montreal, Salzburg, and Philadelphia - for an intensive trio of concerts during the orchestra's three-week residency here, which ends Saturday.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
When the Philadelphia Orchestra filed for Chapter 11 last spring, its leaders said the reorganization would cost $2.9 million in legal and administrative fees, and they predicted the orchestra would be out of bankruptcy in the latter part of 2011. The legal tab now looks likely to be triple that initial estimate, and the case is entering its second year. On April 16, 2011, the ensemble's 75-member board voted - with a few abstentions, and all five musicians on the board voting "no" - to become the first major U.S. orchestra to file for bankruptcy.
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Music of the Americas, with its refreshing lack of foreignness, is easy to take for granted. No mental reaching across oceans, centuries, or time zones is needed to make contact with this music. It's our stuff. So it must be easy. That's why Leonard Bernstein's Serenade for Solo Violin, Strings, Harp and Percussion , one of the most distinctive concertos of the 20th century, is so often performed badly, and why the Peruvian fusion represented by Gabriela Lena Frank's new Concertino Cusqueño - both were played Thursday by the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Kimmel Center - was barely thinkable a few decades ago. The two pieces stood together beautifully, partly because they both bring certain European composers over here.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns and Inquirer Music Critic
Journalists are supposed to be the ultimate Zeligs: We pop up at the right places with faces hidden by the shoulders and hairdos of the famous and powerful. We observe and report, always in the thick of things but never part of them. Journalists aren't usually role models or public figures, aren't elected officials, and don't receive taxpayer money. Who cares which ones are gay? But Anderson Cooper, 45, the CNN star journalist who yesterday came out as a gay man (to nobody's surprise)
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin and INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Toting Mickey Mouse dolls and donning Lilly Pulitzer shifts, the city's youngest classical-music fans made for a gorgeous spectacle Saturday morning filing into the Academy of Music. Yes, the Philadelphia Orchestra's family concert was returning just this once to the Academy, which the ensemble largely left behind in 2001 for more acoustically advanced environs down the block. The Academy is "still a little bit our home," the orchestra's next music director, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, told the audience.
NEWS
March 24, 2013
Sunday at 2 p.m., WRTI-FM (90.1) broadcasts a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from November 2011. Yannick Nézet-Séguin leads an Italian-themed program: Tchaikovsky's Francesca da Rimini , Mendelssohn's Symphony No. 4 , the overture to Verdi's La Forza del Destino , and Respighi's The Pines of Rome .
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The publisher doesn't toss the morning paper onto your lawn, nor does the airline pilot walk down the aisle asking for your choice of beverage. So when the music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra popped up unannounced at the Kimmel Center box office Monday as season single tickets went on sale, the patron on the other side of the window was startled. And charmed. "He's a nice, young, exuberant and lovely person to represent the orchestra," Carolyn Platt of Abington said of Yannick Nézet-Séguin, who this season becomes the orchestra's eighth music director.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns and Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra's Stokowski Celebration could easily have been another opportunity to play standard repertoire at its previous home, the Academy of Music. With high-quality performances, there's nothing wrong with that. But at Thursday's opening of the four-concert festival, add-ons were everywhere: Video monitors in the lobby displayed the statuesque Leopold Stokowski in photos from his 1912-1941 Philadelphia tenure along with designs for a new concert hall he proposed — strangely resembling the Mann Center for the Performing Arts.
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NEWS
March 24, 2013
Sunday at 2 p.m., WRTI-FM (90.1) broadcasts a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from November 2011. Yannick Nézet-Séguin leads an Italian-themed program: Tchaikovsky's Francesca da Rimini , Mendelssohn's Symphony No. 4 , the overture to Verdi's La Forza del Destino , and Respighi's The Pines of Rome .
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - Tracking conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin requires maps of North America and Europe, though he's close to the city that's loving him back in this month's guest appearances: a Metropolitan Opera La Traviata revival that's likely to be hotter than most new productions. The three principal singers all made debuts of sorts Thursday: Soprano Diana Damrau sang her first Violetta, Plácido Domingo added another baritone role to his repertoire with Germont, and Albanian tenor Saimir Pirgu, as Alfredo, sang his first major role here.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Yannick Nézet-Séguin announced his second Philadelphia Orchestra season Wednesday in a climate of acclaim so intense that a less sturdy musician might be braced for the cyclical backlash that the likes of Lang Lang and Gustavo Dudamel have experienced before him. But he says he's just happy word is circulating that the Philadelphia Orchestra is back. "It's so important that what's happening in our city gets quickly spread around," the new music director said. As for backlash?
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Yannick Nézet-Séguin announced his second Philadelphia Orchestra season Thursday in a climate of acclaim so intense that a less sturdy musician might be braced for the cyclical backlash that the likes of Lang Lang and Gustavo Dudamel have experienced before him. But he says he's just happy word is circulating that the Philadelphia Orchestra is back. "It's so important that what's happening in our city gets quickly spread around," the new music director said. As for backlash?
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Just as conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin suggested a year ago, the Philadelphia Orchestra will follow him onto the prestigious Deutsche Grammophon recording label this spring, though so far only one disc is assured. After a string of performances of Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring this month, the orchestra will record the groundbreaking 1913 ballet along with Leopold Stokowski Bach transcriptions in a disc that will be a tribute to the orchestra's first great music director. The pairing is unusual, even unprecedented.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Amid the plethora of recent triumphs by the Philadelphia Orchestra and music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin, it's almost a relief to report that their latest program, however wonderful, wasn't all the way there. So they're still human. And there's room to grow. Thursday's Verizon Hall stop in their journey showed occasional instances of less-than-sturdy transitions and tempos that didn't track with each other. A problem? Not if you heard the concert as an orchestra and conductor reaching beyond their usual standard.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Yannick Nézet-Séguin began Wednesday's Philadelphia Orchestra concert at a point where his predecessor Charles Dutoit would have ended: Ravel's La Valse . Was something Oedipal going on here? Whatever the case, the program evolved into a provocative package, allowing familiar music to be heard with refreshed ears. Ravel's 1920 piece is about the dissolution of the 19th century, embodied by a waltz that refuses to adapt no matter how much the harmonic floor crumbles beneath it. The piece eventually waltzes itself to death, going down with a final whack of militaristic percussion.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
If notes on staves were New Year's greetings, the Philadelphia Orchestra would have sailed a sheaf of good wishes out into Verizon Hall Monday night. At what he told a sold-out crowd was "the biggest party in town," Yannick Nézet-Séguin led a program that, Janus-like, glanced back at a year of "great moments and maybe not-so-great moments," but looked forward, too. Everyone knew what he meant. Never uttered was the word bankruptcy , but by forming a first half of the program with Haydn's "Farewell" Symphony and music from Strauss' Der Rosenkavalier , the orchestra's music director put sound to his aspirations, and, it's hoped, the city's as well.
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Music of the Americas, with its refreshing lack of foreignness, is easy to take for granted. No mental reaching across oceans, centuries, or time zones is needed to make contact with this music. It's our stuff. So it must be easy. That's why Leonard Bernstein's Serenade for Solo Violin, Strings, Harp and Percussion , one of the most distinctive concertos of the 20th century, is so often performed badly, and why the Peruvian fusion represented by Gabriela Lena Frank's new Concertino Cusqueño - both were played Thursday by the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Kimmel Center - was barely thinkable a few decades ago. The two pieces stood together beautifully, partly because they both bring certain European composers over here.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Of the Philadelphia Orchestra's eight music directors in 112 years, none has arrived with the vessel-of-hope urgency that accompanies Yannick Nézet-Séguin. Bankruptcy and several years of organizational chaos have cast doubt on the orchestra as a going concern, and its public image has taken a beating. "Beautiful but beleaguered," wrote the New Yorker in advance of the orchestra's Carnegie Hall concert this week. "Can These Philadelphians Be Fabulous Again?" asked the Wall Street Journal.
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