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NEWS
October 3, 1993 | By Lita and Sally Solis-Cohen, FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: What's the value of my standing yarn winder, which I think is around 200 years old? - T.M., Wildwood Answer: In olden days, after yarn was spun on spinning wheels, it had to be wound for easy use. As a result, yarn-winding devices, both those that clamped onto furniture and standing models such as yours, were common household items. Although they're still relatively easy to find, there's little use for them today, except as decorations in country-style rooms. Your oak yarn winder with cherry or maple turned spindles resembling the spokes of a wagon wheel dates from around 1820 to 1830 and probably was made in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
May 5, 2001
Purists repeatedly debunk the Betsy Ross legend. They insist that Betsy was not the creator of the first United States flag, that the Betsy Ross House probably isn't the one she really lived in (although they concede she lived somewhere on the 200 block of Arch Street) and that those bones in the courtyard could be someone else's. To the debunkers: Stifle it. Not only is the Betsy Ross House a tourist attraction, it's long been a field-trip destination for school kids.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2004 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Yarn isn't a painting medium, but "yarn paintings" seems the most accurate way to describe the vivid, eye-dazzling images being shown at the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The 31 "paintings" come from the Huichol Indian culture of west-central Mexico, specifically from artist-shaman Jos? Ben?tez S?nchez. S?nchez "paints" by pressing lengths of colored yarn into boards coated with beeswax. It sounds naively hobbyist, but the intricate detail and finish that S?nchez achieves with this technique are amazing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Toward the end of Meshugah, the new play that Emily Mann has adapted from a novel by Isaac Bashevis Singer, a man and a woman stand facing the audience in the McCarter Theatre. She is all in white; they are about to be married. Neither says a word, yet everything we have gradually learned about them and their relationship is reflected in their stances and expressions. They are at once at a beginning and an end. They have never been more close, nor more apart. The moment is just a pose, as if for an unseen photographer.
NEWS
September 25, 2010
Helen Levitsky, 82, of West Deptford, former owner and operator of the Hook & Needle Yarn Shop in Woodbury, died of cancer on Thursday, Sept. 23, while on a trip to Atlantic City. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Paulsboro, Helen Josephs graduated from Paulsboro High School in 1946. About a year later, she married Aaron Levitsky, whom she met at a USO dance. Though Mrs. Levitsky was an athlete in high school, playing on the tennis and field hockey teams, she had an artistic side, her family said.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1989 | By Howard Goodman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Think of knitting, and chances are you think of a woman of tender temperament - your mother, maybe - sitting close by a fireplace, patiently fingering elongated needles while a ball of yarn sits comfortably on her lap. You probably don't think of a 10-foot-long purple-and-blue computerized machine with a body like an interior compartment of the starship Enterprise, 42 spools of yarn on its roof, photoelectric sensors and hundreds of metallic needles,...
NEWS
August 23, 1993 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They called themselves "Thelma and Louise," two grandmothers on a road trip, armed only with knitting needles and oversized carryall bags. With that image in mind, Marion Litson of Washington and Marcia Luke of Bethesda, Md., chuckled as they wandered through the Stitches Needlework Fair and Consumer Market yesterday at the Valley Forge Convention Center, where they added to their list of knitting projects. "You didn't see that movie, did you?" Litson asked her friend. "Hopefully this will have a different ending.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | Sandy Bauers
At long last, people who care about the environment have something nice to say about those ubiquitous, fossil fuel-based, all-too-disposable plastic bags. Apparently, they make great eco-art. And great purses, placemats, floor mats, chair covers, you name it. Some years back, an ingenious soul -- no one is quite sure who -- figured out how to cut the bags into strips that could be fused into longer lengths or loops, which in turn could be linked the same way as a string of rubber bands.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Uncle Sam wanted Michael A. Yarn. Monday, he got him back. In February 1990, Yarn, a staff sergeant with nearly 18 years of service in the Army, escaped from military police in Frankfurt, Germany, while awaiting court-martial on charges of assault and attempted kidnapping of a German woman. Nine months later - after he was convicted in absentia by a military tribunal and sentenced to 15 years in Leavenworth - the Chicago native was charged with rape in the City of Chester.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1989 | By Laurie T. Conrad, Special to The Inquirer
Did it sprout from the luxurious undercoat of the cashmere goat or from the back of the lowly yak? Jacques De Loux Inc., a Sellersville sweater manufacturer, has filed suit against one of its yarn suppliers in an effort to unravel the answer to this crucial question about a $129,000 yarn shipment the company received last month. The suit, filed Wednesday in Bucks County Court, alleges that P. Mailhe Filature, a French spinning mill, shipped 2,315 pounds of chestnut-brown yak hair instead of the more expensive, 100 percent cashmere De Loux had ordered.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The camera pushes forward, taking us with it, across a deserted, wooded hilltop toward an inviting country house. We're transported through the door, along the hallway, and stop in front of a display case on the far wall. It's a framed collection of butterflies. Marked by delicate wings yellow and blue, red and green, they are firmly affixed to the back board with pins. Almost imperceptibly, one of the creatures stirs. It flaps its wings more deliberately now, and flies out. Crash!
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
The fiber arts never stuck with Melissa Maddonni Haims. Although her mother was a master knitter who even stitched suits, Haims never mastered a straight line. Until 2008. Haims' mother, dying of cancer, asked her daughter to finish a scarf she'd started making for her best friend. "She had about 10 days to live," remembers Haims, 41, a trained artist who was working in found-object mixed media at the time. "I finished the scarf in record time, about two days, and she said, 'OK, go into the living room, behind the yellow curtain, in the blue bag, I have another one for you.' " As Haims mourned, she worked her way through her mother's unfinished projects, completing scarf after scarf, casting off on a navy blue sweater that clearly had been intended for Haims - it was in her high school colors.
NEWS
February 15, 2013
M ARTIN HEILMAN, 61, of Abington, has been president of Wayne Mills, a Germantown fabric manufacturer, since 2006. The family-owned company, which has been around since 1910 , makes narrow woven fabric strips in a former textile mill. Heilman began working at the company in 1969 running a boxing machine for $1.50 an hour. Q: What exactly does the business do? A: We're currently weaving about 40 different yarns, with about 50 percent of the business cotton, 45 percent polyester and 5 percent nylon.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Dorothy Golley's first yarncraft class at Audubon Towers drew a crowd. "I put up a poster in the lobby saying 'hookers needed,' " says Golley, 88. "When we met, some of the men in the building stood around and watched. They wanted to know where the hookers were. " Sorry, fellas. The dozen ladies gathered in the community room of the seniors complex were there to make hats, not whoopee. That was in 2010. Since then, Golley's lively group of grandmotherly gals has donated more than 500 woolly, hand-hooked winterwear items to programs for South Jersey's sick or needy kids and to churches.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | Sandy Bauers
At long last, people who care about the environment have something nice to say about those ubiquitous, fossil fuel-based, all-too-disposable plastic bags. Apparently, they make great eco-art. And great purses, placemats, floor mats, chair covers, you name it. Some years back, an ingenious soul -- no one is quite sure who -- figured out how to cut the bags into strips that could be fused into longer lengths or loops, which in turn could be linked the same way as a string of rubber bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012
IN CASE YOU haven't heard, yarn bombing is the new graffiti, and not just because it's cleaner and more environmentally-friendly. Yarn bombing is the act of knitting a cozy or warmer to spontaneously and secretly wrap around something in a public space.One famous examples of this guerrilla knitting is last April's bombing of the Rocky statue at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. To prove how mainstream the movement has become, it's moved into...
NEWS
December 30, 2011 | By Kathy Van Mullekom, NEWPORT NEWS VA. DAILY PRESS
[]If feathered friends are frequent visitors to your yard, here are easy and healthful winter treats, important when natural sources are gone. The recipes come from Cole's wild bird feed, www.coleswildbird.com .   PINECONE FEEDERS Materials: Large pinecones Ribbon, yarn, or twine 1 cup lard 1 cup peanut butter 1 cup shelled seed, such as sunflower meats 1/4 cup raisins or...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2011
DEAR READERS: It's April 1, the day I get to share some of the occasional letters I receive from folks who are pulling my leg. Read on: DEAR ABBY: My wife of 23 years is threatening to divorce me on the grounds that I'm "unreasonable. " Is it unreasonable for me to attempt to keep my socks oriented to the proper feet? When I put my socks on the wrong feet, I run around in circles and become disoriented. I know that women don't have this problem because they wear pantyhose - so it's impossible to put them on the wrong feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2010 | This review originally was published Wednesday. By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Rachel McAdams streaks across Morning Glory , a diverting comedy about the three-ring circus of morning TV, like dimples shot from a cannon. She's sharp, sexy, and funny. Too bad the script does not permit her to be all three at the same time. After Becky Fuller (McAdams) is fired as assistant producer of Good Morning, New Jersey , she gets hired as producer/ringmaster of Daybreak , a morning show with ratings in the cellar and staff morale in the subbasement. Can Becky revive the moribund show?
NEWS
November 10, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Rachel McAdams streaks across Morning Glory , a diverting comedy about the three-ring circus of morning TV, like dimples shot from a cannon. She's sharp, sexy, and funny. Too bad the script does not permit her to be all three at the same time. After Becky Fuller (McAdams) is fired as assistant producer of Good Morning, New Jersey , she gets hired as producer/ringmaster of Daybreak , a morning show with ratings in the cellar and staff morale in the subbasement. Can Becky revive the moribund show?
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