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NEWS
December 18, 1994 | By Eils Lotozo, FOR THE INQUIRER
For shoppers seeking inexpensive, high-quality gifts as the number of shopping days to Christmas dwindles, here is Part II of our list of notable paperbacks from 1994: Nature lovers are sure to appreciate any of the following: Broadsides From the Other Order: A Book of Bugs (Random House, $12), a collection of Sue Hubbell's graceful essays on entomology; Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice, by Mark J. Plotkin (Penguin, $11.95), an ethnobotanist's chronicle of his amazing adventures in the Amazon; and The Crystal Desert: Summers in Antarctica (Houghton Mifflin, $10.95)
NEWS
January 11, 2008 | By Alexa Danner, COLUMBIA NEWS SERVICE
After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Jonelle Raffino found herself suddenly out of work. So did her husband, mother and father, who, like Raffino, had been consultants in the telecommunications industry. When the stock market plunged, their jobs simply disappeared. Desperate for a way to turn around their bad luck, Raffino and her mother, Jonette Beck, saw a possible solution. "We turned to an old family friend," Raffino says. "Knitting. " Yarn can be created from soy fiber, a byproduct of tofu manufacturing, the pair learned.
LIVING
May 20, 2009 | By Natalie Pompilio FOR THE INQUIRER
The six knitters call themselves "The Needle Nuts," but what really makes them wacky is yarn. "I have more yarn than A.C. Moore," confessed Barbara Devarenne, 52. Responding to a few incredulous looks, she added, "I'm serious. " Fellow Needle Nut Dawn McCormick nodded solemnly. "She's serious. " So having Linda Ostroff and her traveling yarn shop come to their recent weekly meeting at Mary Lou Cuneo's Franklinville home - with seemingly endless skeins of yarns in all colors and materials spreading over three tables - was a dream come true.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012
IN CASE YOU haven't heard, yarn bombing is the new graffiti, and not just because it's cleaner and more environmentally-friendly. Yarn bombing is the act of knitting a cozy or warmer to spontaneously and secretly wrap around something in a public space.One famous examples of this guerrilla knitting is last April's bombing of the Rocky statue at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. To prove how mainstream the movement has become, it's moved into...
BUSINESS
October 20, 2005 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A.C. Moore Arts & Crafts Inc. blamed a glut of yarn supplies, unusually hot weather, and high gas prices for its third-quarter loss. The Berlin, Camden County, retailer said yesterday that it lost $1.9 million, or 10 cents a share, in the quarter that ended Sept. 30, compared with a profit of $865,000, or 4 cents a share, in the same period a year earlier. "We are beginning to experience declines in our yarn sales," chief executive officer Jack Parker said in a statement. "Last year at this time we were achieving major sales increases that cannot be repeated this year given the large supply of yarn in the marketplace.
NEWS
August 30, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the long history of the Academy of Music, perhaps no memorable moment was like the one when the false teeth of Grant L. Blankin Jr. got a standing ovation. The moment came during his solo as a second tenor at a spring concert of the Orpheus Club of Philadelphia in the 1990s, his daughter Leslie Lane said. "Right in the middle of the song," she said, "his bridge dropped right onto the stage. "To the surprise of the blue-haired set - and without missing a beat - he reached over, picked them up, put them back in his mouth, and finished the song.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Bruno Dumont's L'Humanite defies the laws of physics by filling an empty space with a vacuum. An understandably controversial prize-winner at Cannes, L'Humanite dawdles along for 148 minutes. When a director allots himself such a generous canvas, it's reasonable to expect that his characters will emerge with more dimension and vividness than usual. While Dumont's movie has its striking scenes, it is doomed to a sense of lethargy and inertia by the kind of people it ponders and the context in which they are placed.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
To hear him tell it, David Morse really would rather be in Philadelphia. The actor, who fled Los Angeles with his wife and three children after the January 1994 earthquake destroyed their Sherman Oaks home, claims to have left behind envious friends and colleagues. "I think everyone feels captive by career out there," Morse said. "Everyone I tell I've left, they've all expressed the sentiment, 'I wish we could leave.' " Morse, a Boston native, and his wife, Susan, chose Philadelphia because she'd grown up here.
NEWS
August 3, 1986 | By Calvin Trillin
A newspaper headline I've had on my bulletin board since early this summer says, "Reagan is told of Norwegian whaling infractions. " I didn't actually read the story that went with it. I seem to be doing more and more of that these days (saving the headline and not bothering to read the story). I sort of slipped into the habit, I suppose, when I began to realize that the stories weren't really measuring up. It's almost certain, for instance, that what followed "Reagan is told of Norwegian whaling infractions" (what I think of as the off-the-rack story)
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
The Willingboro Board of Education wanted to save money. When administrators discovered that fumes from improperly shampooed carpeting at Twin Hills Elementary School were making people sick, the district decided to rinse the 20-year-old carpets a few more times instead of ripping them up. The task was done, but pupils and teachers said the fumes became stronger, and they felt worse. Children became nauseated. Three teachers had to go to the hospital. Now, the school will be closed until at least Monday while the carpet is being replaced.
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