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Yellow Cab

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NEWS
August 13, 1986
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, which held a hearing Monday in Philadelphia on Yellow Cab's insurance problems, needs to be more vigorous in monitoring the taxi business and assuring reliable service. The PUC has been too nonchalant while Yellow has been drifting into bankruptcy. Metro Transportation Co., which operates Yellow Cab, won a reprieve last week in U.S. District Court where it filed a petition for protection under federal bankruptcy laws. Balboa Insurance Co. of California had threatened to cancel insurance for Yellow Cab but was blocked by a temporary restraining order.
NEWS
October 2, 1986
U.S. Bankruptcy Judge David A. Scholl had no good choices in the case of Yellow Cab Co. of Philadelphia. If he had rejected its self-insurance plan, as the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission had done earlier, Philadelphia's largest taxi company (600 cabs, 1,500 employees) would have ceased operation yesterday - leaving about 600 other cabs owned by smaller firms and independent drivers to provide service. If he accepted the plan, as he did Monday in a 22-page opinion and order, he would appear to be going out of his way to prop up a company that filed for bankruptcy protection in July and has a long record of financial troubles.
NEWS
September 26, 1986 | By ANN GERHART and BOB GROTEVANT, Daily News Staff Writers
The fat lady hasn't sung for Yellow Cab yet, but she was heard warming up yesterday in Harrisburg. The Public Utility Commission voted 3-0 yesterday that Metro Transportation Co., Yellow's parent firm, may not use self-insurance in a bid to keep its 600 cabs on the streets. Metro attorneys have asked a U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge to overrule the PUC decision. Some 150 owner-operators associated with Yellow will be allowed to keep operating, however, if they get insurance under the state's assigned-risk plan, the PUC ruled.
NEWS
August 7, 1986 | By MICHAEL SOKOLOVE, Daily News Staff Writer
Another day in the life of Yellow Cab: Readers will remember that this perpetually sagging firm was saved from near certain death last week, when a judge ordered its insurer to continue providing coverage, even though Yellow Cab had not paid monthly premiums to the insurer. The story picked back up again in Bankruptcy Court yesterday, when Judge Emil Goldhaber was to rule on whether to continue the order or revoke it - which would effectively put Yellow out of business, since it had no prospect of getting insurance elsewhere and state law does not allow uninsured cabs on the streets.
NEWS
May 5, 1987 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
When Bernie Seitlin came out of Bookbinders at 2nd and Walnut streets after dinner on a spring evening three years ago, he hailed a cab to drive him home. A Philadelphia Yellow Cab driver, however, pulled away from Seitlin as he opened the door, yelling, "I don't want any mutts in here. " Seitlin, of Kater Street near 7th, is blind. The "mutt" in question was his guide dog, a golden retriever named Lucan. Yesterday, Commonwealth Court in Harrisburg ruled the cab company broke the state's utility regulation law and must pay a $500 fine.
NEWS
July 29, 1986 | By MICHAEL SOKOLOVE, Daily News Staff Writer
Yellow Cab Co. will be forced off the streets by the state Public Utility Commission as of Friday unless it can find insurance for its cabs by then, the Daily News has learned. "There will be an order issued Friday and they will be shut down unless there is a new insurance filing," said Barry Ernst, director of the non-rail division of the PUC, which regulates taxicabs statewide. A shutdown would idle about half the city's taxicab fleet - Yellow has been operating an estimated 600 cabs per day - and would put 1,000 or more full- and part-time drivers out of work.
NEWS
September 30, 1986 | By RAMONA SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
The city's rush-hour traffic still will be dotted with hundreds of yellow taxis tomorrow morning, thanks to a bankruptcy judge who blocked an attempt to put the cabs off the street at midnight tonight. But the continued operation of Yellow Cab Co., which operates the city's largest taxi fleet and employs 1,400 people, will be a mixed blessing, officials for the Public Utility Commission said yesterday. First, Yellow will be operating under a self-insurance plan that the PUC says might prove unable to pay its claims.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fate of Philadelphia's troubled Yellow Cab Co., which faces a shutdown just six days from now, will go down to the wire following a decision yesterday by a U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge. Judge David A. Scholl, who was asked last week to allow Yellow Cab to operate its own self-insurance program, decided to postpone a ruling on the request until the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission issues a formal decision on the matter today. Scholl's decision not to act leaves the future of Philadelphia's largest taxi fleet and its 1,400 employees up in the air. Attorneys for Yellow Cab, which operates about half of the 1,200 taxicabs in the city, have testified that the company would be forced to shut down Wednesday if it is not permitted to operate a self-insurance plan.
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NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Camden man was charged with killing a taxi driver in Burlington City last month, authorities said Tuesday. Carey L. Coleman Jr., 22, shot Larry Hamilton, 49, of Trenton, once in the head early June 16, according to the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office and Burlington City police. Hamilton was found dead inside his taxi. Authorities did not reveal a motive. Hamilton is one of a number of taxi drivers who have been assaulted, robbed, or killed in the Philadelphia region in recent months.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Authorities were investigating Monday the killing of a taxi driver early Sunday in Burlington City. Officers dispatched to investigate an incident in which a cab was discovered by the side of the road found Larry Hamilton, 49, of Trenton, in the vehicle at Route 130 and York Street, the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office and Burlington City police said. No arrests had been made, and authorities offered no details about the killing, including how Hamilton was killed or a possible motive.
NEWS
May 9, 2013
IT WAS a dangerous night for Philly cab drivers. The 40-year-old man who was injured in a carjacking by a woman in Crescentville Tuesday night was a taxi driver working for Yellow Cab, police said yesterday. That incident occurred several hours before the slaying of taxi driver Hafiz Salman Sarfaraz at 12:30 a.m. yesterday in West Philadelphia. The driver in the Crescentville incident, who was not identified, went to pick up a fare at McDonald's on Adams Avenue near Howell Street about 7 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
October 14, 2009 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
As a Philadelphia police officer showed a judge photographs of the taxi cab that plowed into a young mother and son last year, killing the boy, he spoke yesterday of the flesh, blood and skin recovered from the cab's shattered windshield. Officer Charles Phillips' testimony during the opening day of Yellow Cab driver Yves Aristilde's nonjury trial proved to be too much detail for Common Pleas Judge Benjamin Lerner. "I think we are going way beyond what is necessary . . . From an evidence point of view, I don't know why we have to put everyone in the courtroom through this," Lerner told the prosecutor before ordering a short break.
NEWS
August 26, 2008 | By Sam Wood and Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A Haitian-born cabdriver has been charged with murder in a hit-and-run that killed a 5-year-old boy and critically injured the child's mother, police said yesterday. Yves Aristilde, 62, surrendered to police Sunday afternoon and identified himself as the driver of a Yellow Cab that struck the boy and his mother, police said. Bail was set at $6 million. Police had been seeking the driver who struck Dana Reynolds, 23, and her son Tyrell Elliot as they crossed Windrim Avenue shortly before 2 a.m. Sunday in the city's Logan section.
NEWS
August 25, 2008 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police last night charged a Yellow Cab Co. driver with vehicular homicide in an early-morning hit-and-run in Logan that left a young mother clinging to life and her 5-year-old son dead. The man, who was not identified, surrendered to authorities last night, telling police at the 35th District that he had heard that they wanted to talk to him, according to police spokeswoman Christine O'Brien. He was later charged and was awaiting arraignment early this morning. Police had been seeking the driver who struck Dana Reynolds, 23, and her son Tyrell Elliott while the two were crossing Windrim Avenue near Lindley Avenue about 2:30 a.m. - and then sped off, later ditching the vehicle.
NEWS
May 4, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Milton A. Eisenberg, 87, of Cheltenham, retired president of the Yellow Cab Co., management consultant, and civic activist, died of pancreatic cancer Wednesday at home. Mr. Eisenberg graduated from Olney High School, joined Yellow Cab as a garage clerk in 1941, then was drafted into the Army before the attack on Pearl Harbor. During World War II, he was a sergeant with the 14th Evacuation Hospital in India. He returned to Yellow Cab after his discharge. By the late 1950s, he was a director of personnel and public relations and later became a vice president.
NEWS
June 28, 2005 | By Anthony S. Twyman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Taxicab fares in Philadelphia are about to rise come July 5. The board of the Philadelphia Parking Authority, which oversees taxis in the city, yesterday approved the first base-fare increase for cabdrivers in 14 years. The initial fare when the meter is first activated, known as the "flag drop," will remain $2.30. The fare for the average cab ride of about 2 1/2 miles will climb from $7.40 to $8.75, according to James Ney, director of the authority's taxi and limousine division.
SPORTS
July 18, 2004 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was a prankster. And he loved to laugh. Unless the joke was on him. Then Manute Bol could become downright irritated. But for the most part, "he was just fun to be around," former teammate Charles Barkley said. The humanitarian spirit and shot-blocking ability of the center from Sudan were evident, but his time with the 76ers was also characterized by lots of laughs. What happened to Bol at about 9 p.m. on June 30 in Colchester, Conn., was no laughing matter. He was riding in a Yellow cab driven by Neville H. Robinson, 48, of Hartford, Conn.
NEWS
May 13, 2004 | By L. Stuart Ditzen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Parking Authority's plan to take over regulation of city taxicabs is in limbo for want of a law. That means the proposed regulations aimed at improving cab service are on hold and an existing state enforcement program to investigate rider complaints and weed out illegal operators has been slowed down. The state legislature had been expected to adopt a law months ago transferring regulatory powers for Philadelphia taxis from the state Public Utility Commission to the Parking Authority.
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