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Yellow Fever

NEWS
September 27, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Laid up? Feeling weak, nauseous? Got a splitting headache? Vomiting dark matter? Gums bleeding? Eyes and skin taking on a yellow tinge? If this were 200 years ago in Philadelphia, the diagnosis would be easy. You had yellow fever like everyone else. What to do? Well, if this was 1793 you might call in Dr. William Currie with his cautious, conservative treatment: Take tartar emetic in tea or barley water every half hour until you vomit. Take salt of tartar in lime juice and barley water or laudanum and ammonia to encourage sweating.
NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the summer of 1798, and fear ruled in Philadelphia. For the second time in five years, a devastating epidemic of yellow fever was sweeping through the nation's capital. Wealthy and influential residents, including President John Adams, fled to the countryside in droves, as they had learned to do during prior outbreaks. Those who could not leave were at the mercy of the virus, which attacked the liver, caused bleeding and vomiting, and sent people running into the streets screaming in delirium.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2012 | Ellen Gray
Editor's note: Due to a production error, this story did not appear in Tuesday's Daily News. It is being repeated in full today. PHILADELPHIA: THE GREAT EXPERIMENT. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, 6ABC. By ellen gray Daily News Television Critic IF FILMMAKER Ken Burns had had Sam Katz's budget, we might still be in the early innings of "Baseball. " But Katz, the former mayoral candidate, who, along with his son, Philip, has been at work for a few years on a documentary series on the history of Philadelphia, is making progress.
NEWS
May 17, 2008 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She has held the same tortured pose for more than 130 years, her face contorted, her mouth open wide in a scream. Bony hands press against her sides, and strands of strawberry-blond hair fall behind her. Who is this mysterious woman at the M?tter Museum in Center City? How and when did she die? And what can modern science tell us about her? One night last week, after the museum closed, radiographers, forensics experts and technicians attempted to pry the secrets from the so-called "soap lady" using high-tech portable X-ray equipment.
NEWS
March 26, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Author Tom Clancy has given his ex-wife half of his interest in the Baltimore Orioles as part of their divorce agreement. Clancy, who penned such military thrillers as The Hunt for Red October and Patriot Games, and ex-wife Wanda each now own about 12 percent of the team. Clancy was part of an investment group that paid $173 million for the Orioles in 1993. He and his ex-wife are the second-biggest shareholders in the team, behind lawyer Peter Angelos. Wanda Clancy's attorney, Sheila K. Sachs, said her client was always the baseball fan in the Clancy household.
NEWS
July 3, 2003 | By Jillian McKoy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amid the city's July Fourth celebration, about 200 people last night celebrated something much more personal to them - their African American heritage. They assembled about 6 p.m. in front of London Coffeehouse at 2 S. Front St. to begin what organizers called the "Trail of Blood and Tears" - a walking tour around the city's historic district. Some dressed in traditional African garb, and others bore chains, ropes and duct tape on their hands, feet and backs to represent the brutal enslavement that their ancestors endured in this city.
NEWS
November 1, 2001 | By Jane R. Eisner
For a lesson on how to draw civic good from the ongoing anthrax threat, we turn now to the yellow fever epidemic of 1793. There is a connection here. Trust me. This lesson comes to us courtesy of Sally F. Griffith, a historian at Franklin & Marshall College, who has written about the epidemic through the pen of one Mathew Carey. Carey, a Philadelphia printer and bookseller, published A Short Account of the Malignant Fever, Lately Prevalent in Philadelphia, which became what could only be described as a bestseller, going to four editions.
NEWS
August 24, 2005
The sprawling, brick Lazaretto Quarantine Station, built between 1799 and 1801 to treat arriving immigrants suffering from yellow fever, cholera and small pox, fortunately is no longer on Pennsylvania's list of endangered historic properties now that Tinicum Township has purchased the property. Randy Cotton of the Preservation Alliance of Greater Philadelphia says the sprawling 10-acre site that includes a main pavilion and two former hospital wings is the oldest facility of its kind in the nation.
NEWS
May 1, 2011
In the 1790s, Benjamin H. Latrobe was one of the most accomplished architects and engineers in England. When he immigrated to the United States in 1796, Latrobe brought new European standards and training in his field from Germany, France, and Italy. His innovative designs started the Greek Revival movement in American architecture, the first truly national style, resonating with classical ideals of tradition and democracy. After a brief period in Virginia, Latrobe moved to Philadelphia to design the city's public water system, a plan that took water from the Schuylkill at Philadelphia, piped it to Center Square (now City Hall)
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Who would have thought Sam Katz would become an accomplished documentary filmmaker? That talent was never on display when he ran for mayor again and again and again. But Katz has turned his efforts in a new direction, and it has been to Philadelphia's benefit. The second in his Philadelphia: The Great Experiment series of documentaries will air at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday on WPVI, Channel 6. The documentary, Fever: 1793, looks at the yellow fever epidemic that hit Philadelphia that year.
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