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Yellow Fever

ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007
Top Regional Attractions Academy of Natural Sciences 1900 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-299-1000. www.ansp.org . Amazon Voyage: Vicious Fishes & Other Riches - Exhibit on biodiversity, field research, resource management & Amazon culture. Closes 12/31. $10; $8 seniors, students, military, children 3-12; free for children under 3. Mon.-Fri. 10 am-4:30 pm, Sat.-Sun. 10 am-5 pm. American Swedish Historical Museum 1900 Pattison Ave.; 215-389-1776. www.americanswedish.
NEWS
December 15, 2009 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
The discovery of seven graves in the basement of a home undergoing renovation in the city's Fairmount section is a reminder that Philadelphia is dotted with forgotten burial grounds. The origins of the bones - found in the graves on the 800 block of North 20th Street - has not been determined. But records show that one of the city's many potter's fields was located nearby, at North 19th Street and Fairmount Avenue. The burial ground served as a last resting place for many of those who died at Bush Hill, a former estate that was first used as a hospital during the 1793 yellow-fever outbreak and then became the site of the city's Municipal Hospital for Contagious Diseases until 1855.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | By Robert Cooke, NEWSDAY
Like an anxious bomb squad watching while a fuse burns short, the world's mosquito experts are bracing for a bang that seems inevitable. Throughout the tropics, populations of dangerous, disease-carrying mosquitoes are rebounding, and the prospects are grim indeed. "They're back, and it's like we made them mad," said virologist Barry Beaty. The mosquito Aedes aegypti, which transmits yellow fever and dengue, has recently spread disease in Cuba, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and other parts of the Caribbean.
NEWS
October 16, 2003 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
A history of Philadelphia's 1793 yellow fever epidemic, a biography of West Chester native and civil-rights leader Bayard Rustin, a critique of the Soviet Gulag, and novels by veterans Scott Spencer, Shirley Hazzard and Edward P. Jones are among this year's nominees for the National Book Awards. The National Book Foundation announced the nominations yesterday in New York. An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793 (Clarion Books/Houghton Mifflin)
NEWS
November 7, 2001
The headline read, "In times of uncertainty, how much more can we take?" (Inquirer, Nov. 4). We don't know, but we have a choice. We can curl up in a corner, wringing our hands, paralyzed by anticipation and fear. Or we can pick ourselves up and conduct our lives as well as we can in light of our new circumstances. The survival of the human species has always been due to our ability to adjust to our changing environment. Why would we stop now? We don't have to begin each day by listening to an hour-by-hour drip of bad news on CNN; we can begin each day by listening to our favorite music station on the radio and listen to only headline news.
NEWS
September 4, 2008
The column in Sunday's Currents, "Stem cell research at a crossroads," written by Brooke Ellison of the Empire State Stem Cell Board, was a surprising viewpoint from someone on an ethics committee. Ethics is about choosing to do the harder right, instead of the easier wrong; it's about making the tough choice when the easier choice is more expedient. Regardless of how history sees President Bush in total, he was correct in his tough choice on embryonic stem cell research. Yes, countless people will die because science has yet to catch up with some diseases as rapidly as perhaps possible, but this is as it has always been.
NEWS
May 30, 2010
Philadelphia is home to several monuments dedicated to the men and women who died while in military service, including the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, located in Washington Square. In 1682, William Penn's surveyor, Thomas Holme, laid out the city grid to include five planned squares, one of which was Southeast Square at Locust and Sixth Streets. For much of the 18th century, this square was a grazing land and a potter's field. During the Revolutionary War, it was used as a burial ground for fallen colonial soldiers.
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even the best scientists and doctors get things wrong. The great physician Benjamin Rush tortured yellow-fever victims with a "treatment" that involved purging and flatulence. Charles Darwin made sexist statements that would get him drummed out of most universities. As Philadelphia launches a two-week celebration of science on Friday, a group of historians are planning their presentation of the bloopers and blunders, the dated and the discredited. Their program, called Seemed Right at the Time?
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