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Yeltsin

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NEWS
July 20, 1995 | By Inga Saffron, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since President Boris N. Yeltsin was hospitalized last week with a heart condition, many have been wondering just how sick the Russian leader is. The answer depends as much on the translation as on the diagnosis. In a brief interview Tuesday on Russian television, Yeltsin revealed for the first time that he had suffered a serdetchnii pristup - literally an "assault of the heart" - resulting from ischemia, insufficient oxygen supply to the heart muscle. Many news organizations, including The Inquirer, Reuters and the BBC, rendered the phrase as heart attack.
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Does Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin drink? Da. Has his imbibing gotten out of control? Absolutely nyet, one of his closest aides said yesterday. "I can confidently reject any accusations of excessive drinking," Sergei B. Stankevich, Yeltsin's senior public policy adviser, said yesterday. "I see him in many very different situations. He's actually been quite moderate. " Other sources in the Western diplomatic community in the Russian capital supported this view, although, they said, Yeltsin has looked tired and unwell at times.
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | By Larry Eichel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin yesterday warned Western nations of dire consequences should they allow his economic reforms to fail. After a meeting with British Prime Minister John Major in London yesterday, Yeltsin told reporters that it was still possible that domestic unrest in Russia could reverse the progress that has been made. Should that happen, "Russia will fall into the abyss which has been dug for 74 years," Yeltsin said as he stood outside No. 10 Downing Street.
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin yesterday rejected Mikhail S. Gorbachev's plan to create a confederation of former Soviet republics, effectively killing any hopes of replacing the old Soviet Union with some kind of centralized state. Until yesterday, Yeltsin had supported efforts to preserve some type of union. But while meeting with the heads of Ukraine and Belarus in a so-called Slavic Summit, Yeltsin said that the overwhelming vote in favor of independence in Ukraine had killed chances of a confederation.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | By Owen Ullmann and Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin yesterday announced broad reductions in his country's nuclear forces and challenged the United States to even more dramatic cuts than those proposed by President Bush on Tuesday night. Yeltsin suggested that the two nuclear superpowers maintain only 2,000 to 2,500 warheads each. That is far below the cuts called for in a strategic arms treaty President Bush and former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev signed last year and almost 50 percent greater than the reductions Bush proposed in his State of the Union address.
NEWS
December 20, 1991 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin yesterday took control of the Soviet Foreign Ministry, the Kremlin and most of the KGB, while Mikhail S. Gorbachev said he doubted that the new commonwealth would last. "No, I do not believe in it," the Soviet president told the German newspaper, Bild. "It is not fit for survival. " Gorbachev, nevertheless, launched an intensive lobbying campaign yesterday to lend more structure to the commonwealth of former Soviet republics, whose members meet tomorrow in Alma-Ata, the capital of Kazakhstan.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | By GEORGE F. WILL
In London's Putney Vale Cemetery, eight miles south of Marx's grave in Highgate Cemetery, rest the remains of Alexander Kerensky, who might have spared Russia a 70-year secession from civilization. Boris Yelstin seems to understand the moral of Kerensky's failure. In July 1917, at a moment of extreme fluidity in the dissolution of the old regime, Kerensky became Russia's premier. Perhaps he would have been brushed aside anyway, but his cautious centrism, his insufficient radicalism, doomed him. He would not remove Russia from the war or boldly multiply property owners by redistributing land.
NEWS
October 2, 1991 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
During the 72 hours of the failed August putsch, Sergei B. Stankevich, a senior adviser to Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, helped plot the resistance, manning phone and fax lines at Moscow city hall and in the Russian parliament and setting up an apartment "bunker" stocked with provisions. "We moved like in a movie," recalled Stankevich, 37, who wore a bulletproof vest throughout the drama. "We had no experience with such a situation, so we acted according to images from a film.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Bush promised Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin yesterday that the United States would continue to oppose this week's coup by Soviet hard- liners, but administration officials admitted that there was little Bush could do beyond protesting to help Mikhail S. Gorbachev regain power. Bush said he telephoned Yeltsin and assured him "of continued U.S. support for his goal of the restoration of Mr. Gorbachev as the constitutionally chosen leader. " Bush ordered that all U.S. economic assistance programs for the Soviet Union be put on hold, and he said he was withholding diplomatic recognition of the new regime, citing its "unconstitutional seizure of power.
NEWS
October 11, 1993 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.), in Moscow on a fact-finding trip following the tumultuous events of the last week, said yesterday that he is increasingly concerned about the authoritarian methods Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin is using to subdue his hard-line opponents. Specter, joined by Sen. Robert F. Bennett (R., Utah), described himself as a "tentative" Yeltsin supporter who wanted to get a firsthand look at the situation here after the reactionary uprising against Yeltsin and the storming of the Russian parliament that left 142 people dead.
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SPORTS
February 18, 2010 | By MARCUS HAYES, hayesm@phillynews.com
VANCOUVER - Conflicted? Gennadi Karponosov knows conflicted. In 1994, he was conflicted. Then, he left his homeland, where he and his wife are Olympic heroes. Even as tracer bullets flew outside his apartment in Moscow, he was conflicted. In September of 2007, he was conflicted. Then, he left his American sponsor, the University of Delaware, which smoothed the path for Karponosov and his family to settle and work and thrive in their new home. He and his wife, Natalia Linichuk, decided to move their coaching base to IceWorks, in Aston, Pa. It is a four-rink facility better suited for the space and cost of hosting world-class skaters and their coaches.
NEWS
June 29, 2009 | By Charles Krauthammer
Iran today is a revolution in search of its Yeltsin. Without leadership, demonstrators will take to the street only so many times to face tear gas, batons, and bullets. They need a leader like Boris Yeltsin: a former establishment figure with newly revolutionary credentials and legitimacy, who stands on a tank and gives the opposition direction by calling for the unthinkable: the abolition of the old political order. Right now, the Iranian revolution has no leader. As this is written, opposition candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi has not appeared in public since June 18. And the Khamenei-Ahmadinejad regime has shown efficiency and ruthlessness in suppressing widespread unrest.
NEWS
April 26, 2007 | By Trudy Rubin
As I watched the burial service for Boris Yeltsin in Moscow, I thought back to his visit to Philadelphia in 1989. This was not a bit of parochial musing. His 1989 trip to America - misreported at the time as a drunken junket - perfectly captured the contradictions of the man and the crucial legacy he left Russia. Yeltsin was a flawed human being but also a revolutionary figure. He presided over the collapse of the Soviet Union with almost no bloodshed, an amazing feat given the brutal history of the regime.
NEWS
April 24, 2007 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former President Boris N. Yeltsin, 76, the Soviet apparatchik who made history by clambering atop a tank to stop a hard-line coup in 1991, then led the new Russia through its first tumultuous decade of democracy, has died of heart failure, government officials announced yesterday. While most Westerners will remember the tall, snowy-haired Yeltsin for that bold, telegenic act, which helped to slay the oppressive Soviet Union, he remains a flawed, sometimes reviled, figure in modern Russia.
NEWS
January 3, 2000
The resignation of Russian President Boris Yeltsin, and the ascendancy of acting President Vladimir Putin, could be good news for Russia - and the United States. Mr. Yeltsin will forever be remembered as the man who climbed atop a tank in 1991 and prevented Russia from reverting to communist dictatorship. A transitional figure, he deserves full credit for overseeing the peaceful breakup of the Soviet Union, and for his initial encouragement of democratic reforms. But he long ago lost his ability to govern.
NEWS
January 2, 2000 | By Inga Saffron, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Russia's first popularly elected leader, Boris N. Yeltsin guided his country's dramatic transformation from dictatorship to democracy, overseeing the dismantling of the Soviet empire and the halting construction of a new free-market system. Yeltsin, who resigned Friday, six months before his term was up, always will be remembered as the man who climbed atop a tank to stop a hard-line Communist coup attempt in 1991, and brought the whole totalitarian Soviet system crashing down.
NEWS
January 2, 2000 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The immediate response of Russians to the unexpected resignation of Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday and the ascendancy of Vladimir V. Putin was a broad display of confidence in the new leader. The Russian stock market soared 18 percent to reach its highest point in 15 months. What Russians seemed to be saying by gambling on the stock market was that they believed democracy and market reforms - as fragile as both are - are likely to continue stumbling forward. But Russians also may be gambling that Putin, who was named prime minister only in August, will restore some of Russia's global stature.
NEWS
November 25, 1999 | By Charles T. Call
A few days ago, I returned from a week of interviewing traumatized refugees fleeing Russia's war in Chechnya. At the same time, Russian President Yeltsin and his Prime Minister, Vladimir Putin, were dismissing international concerns about the war at the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe summit in Istanbul, Turkey. My experience at the Chechen border convinced me that the West should continue to press Russia to stop the mass bombing and shelling of cities and towns heavily populated by civilians.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Clinton failed yesterday to persuade Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin to scale back a military campaign that is killing civilians along with rebels in Chechnya, but Western diplomats did win a concession that the international community might play some role in eventually settling the dispute. Clinton won nothing but a rebuke from Yeltsin, first in a meeting of 54 leaders here and then in a private hour-long meeting. Yeltsin told Clinton and the rest of the world that the fighting was not their business.
NEWS
June 21, 1999 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Clinton and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin began yesterday to set aside their differences over Kosovo, with Yeltsin agreeing for the first time to consider revising a landmark treaty banning American and Russian missile-defense systems. The two presidents agreed during a meeting at the Group of Eight summit here to hold discussions this fall on potential changes to the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty and on the third phase of a Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, START III. White House national security adviser Samuel R. Berger deemed the decision "very significant," and noted that Russia previously balked at American attempts to reopen the missile treaty, which curtails the development of missile defenses.
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